Attempted my first very short single track on my Allant+7.

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Took a shot at a beginners 1.8 mile single track trail in Wisconsin this week. Very tight, very windy, lots of minor roots and rocks. Only used Tour mode and rarely shifted. Only took one real dive and was going slow enough that neither body or bike was nicked. Got my foot in between a small tree and the pedal which did jolt and smart for a few minutes. The Allant was great though I won’t be trying it again. Definitely makes me want to do more but with a different bike!
It was a lovely autumn week and took advantage to ride an 18 mile very flat crushed limestone rail trail while pulling my 2 yr old grandson in a Burley. He seemed to like it fine and the +7 pulled like a train!
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AHicks

Well-Known Member
I LOVE trail riding like that. Don't let that one trail discourage you! When exploring a new trail like that, be prepared to throw in the towel and turn around and ride out the way you came in! Don't wait for it to kick your butt. If it get's tough, turn around and go find another one.....

I have a LOT of fun taking little side trips off of larger trails I've already been on, and if I spot a single track I haven't been on, it's like spotting a potential new adventure. Many just go a few feet (duds). Others may go for quite a ways (gems!). The ONLY way you're going to know which is to turn that front wheel far enough to head down it - with caution....
 

Latitude

Well-Known Member
I LOVE trail riding like that. Don't let that one trail discourage you! When exploring a new trail like that, be prepared to throw in the towel and turn around and ride out the way you came in! Don't wait for it to kick your butt. If it get's tough, turn around and go find another one.....

I have a LOT of fun taking little side trips off of larger trails I've already been on, and if I spot a single track I haven't been on, it's like spotting a potential new adventure. Many just go a few feet (duds). Others may go for quite a ways (gems!). The ONLY way you're going to know which is to turn that front wheel far enough to head down it - with caution....
That’s pretty much my approach too. Had to turn back a few times, but other discoveries have become regulars... and uncrowded.
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
I LOVE trail riding like that. Don't let that one trail discourage you! When exploring a new trail like that, be prepared to throw in the towel and turn around and ride out the way you came in! Don't wait for it to kick your butt. If it get's tough, turn around and go find another one.....

I have a LOT of fun taking little side trips off of larger trails I've already been on, and if I spot a single track I haven't been on, it's like spotting a potential new adventure. Many just go a few feet (duds). Others may go for quite a ways (gems!). The ONLY way you're going to know which is to turn that front wheel far enough to head down it - with caution....
I was only discouraged insofar as riding the Allant+7 on such a trail. I’ve been pondering a second ebike but something more like this...😎
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
At 54 lbs (and up), I wonder how realistic it is to do anything other than easy trails on an e-bike? My e-bike is also 55 lbs, and I find it difficult to do anything but the easy trails, but I'm also 76, so maybe I've lost my nerve?
At 70 years old, 6'2" and 315, I'm not your typical picture of a trail rider or somebody that enjoys exploring single tracks - but I've been doing it for over 50 years - on everything from ATV's (big and small), to snowmobiles, to motorcycles. Why should I want to change that when converting to an e-bike?

That said, my experience has shown this fat butt requires a lot of power when a bike I'm on is pointed up a big hill - even a paved one. I have 2 bikes at the moment and both are powered by motors that are well over 1000w. Call that an old habit I've no intention to break, or assurance if you like. The hub drive is a converted Rad City powered by one of the most powerful geared hub motors available (MAC 12t), and it rides on 26x2.1 Schwalbe Marathons. The new mid drive is powered by a Bafang Ultra motor - pretty much the most power available in a mid drive. It's currently on big 26x4 knobbies, soon to be converted to a street tread of the same size. These are both 70+lb bikes.

To the question, how realistic are these bikes are for trail riding? So let me say, they work for me! Do I think you need anything like this to go exploring? Oh geez, no way. Some of the trails I've found, some of my favorites, I can/do ride on PAS 0.

Trails come in all shapes and sizes. It could be 100' long and sugar sand from one end to the other that's used as short cut, or a true gem, a mostly level moss covered single track trail forming a tunnel through thick woods, it's entrances overgrown to the point they're nearly invisible.

The ONLY reason I know about either of these, is because I took the time to check them out after spotting them. My biggest point is, this has little to do with what you are riding. It's way more about your curiosity....
If it looks like you're getting in over your head (or your bike's), don't push it. Get off your bike and turn it 180 degrees and scout out the next trail. You may be surprised how many you drive by now without giving them a second thought....
-Al
 
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Dallant

Well-Known Member
The trail I went on is in the Kettle-Moraine State Park and they have an extensive set of much more difficult MTB trails. I’m much more likely to ride these kind of trails in the future with a full suspension ebike.
 

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AHicks

Well-Known Member
The trail I went on is in the Kettle-Moraine State Park and they have an extensive set of much more difficult MTB trails. I’m much more likely to ride these kind of trails in the future with a full suspension ebike.
You're talking about a way different kind of trail there than I am. MTB trails are generally pretty challenging. I'm not REAL sure a bike with rear suspension is going to alter YOUR ability to navigate something like that. We have some MTB trails locally that are pretty challenging - and are pretty popular for just that reason. Guys come from miles around. I avoid them! Those guys are generally in a much bigger hurry than I am, and are in MUCH better condition than I am! The fact they're also much younger goes without saying.... -Al
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
You're talking about a way different kind of trail there than I am. MTB trails are generally pretty challenging. I'm not REAL sure a bike with rear suspension is going to alter YOUR ability to navigate something like that. We have some MTB trails locally that are pretty challenging - and are pretty popular for just that reason. Guys come from miles around. I avoid them! Those guys are generally in a much bigger hurry than I am, and are in MUCH better condition than I am! The fact they're also much younger goes without saying.... -Al
The rear suspension is for absorbing shock to me/the bike overall and also to help navigate trails like that. Geometry is better, tires are better, gearing is better, etc. I’m also concerned that riding trails like that (or even close to that) is NOT what the Allant was built for and could really damage the bike.
 

ruffruff

Well-Known Member
Get a dedicated eMTB. It will make a world of difference in handling, overall ride and your confidence.
I got back into single track this summer and it's a blast. The first couple times I did the green easy trails--and crasheed!
Now, the blue medium trails are my go to and occasionally I'll try a black.
If i can learn to ride this stuff you can to! This is my son's and mine local goto trail.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
You're talking about a way different kind of trail there than I am. MTB trails are generally pretty challenging. I'm not REAL sure a bike with rear suspension is going to alter YOUR ability to navigate something like that. We have some MTB trails locally that are pretty challenging - and are pretty popular for just that reason. Guys come from miles around. I avoid them! Those guys are generally in a much bigger hurry than I am, and are in MUCH better condition than I am! The fact they're also much younger goes without saying.... -Al
Youth is so wasted on the young ... :)
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Get a dedicated eMTB. It will make a world of difference in handling, overall ride and your confidence.
I got back into single track this summer and it's a blast. The first couple times I did the green easy trails--and crasheed!
Now, the blue medium trails are my go to and occasionally I'll try a black.
If i can learn to ride this stuff you can to! This is my son's and mine local goto trail.
That looks like a blast and the type of trails I’d really like to do more of. The trail I took the other day was way narrower and twistier but didn’t have any of the man-made wood features. It was also a fair amount scarier. I wish I’d had my GoPro working but I forgot my charge cable and the battery was dead.
 

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
Took a shot at a beginners 1.8 mile single track trail in Wisconsin this week. Very tight, very windy, lots of minor roots and rocks. Only used Tour mode and rarely shifted. Only took one real dive and was going slow enough that neither body or bike was nicked. Got my foot in between a small tree and the pedal which did jolt and smart for a few minutes. The Allant was great though I won’t be trying it again. Definitely makes me want to do more but with a different bike!
It was a lovely autumn week and took advantage to ride an 18 mile very flat crushed limestone rail trail while pulling my 2 yr old grandson in a Burley. He seemed to like it fine and the +7 pulled like a train!
View attachment 68894
I have one of those Burley trailers also and they work well. The only thing I would caution is they can be tipped on their side surprisingly easily, especially if you are going fast.
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Yes you need the right tool for the job. If you go on any trails that are rated green or above you could benefit greatly from a proper mountain ebike. The difference is a world of confidence!
It’s too bad we are in such an ebike drought or there might be some good used EMTBs around that aren’t too beat up.