Aventon Level vs. Ride1Up 700

Here are 18 minor differences between the Aventon Level and Ride1Up 700; the info comes from the companies' own websites.

Aventon Level vs. Ride1Up 700:
  1. Battery: 48V, 14Ah (672Wh) with Samsung cells vs. 48V, 14 Ah Reention Rhino 52x Samsung 35E cells smart BMS [Separate battery purchase cost: Level's battery not available separately yet (Aventon Pace's battery of like size is $459) vs. $430]
  2. Motor: 750 peak/500W 48V Brushless Shengyi vs. 1000W peak/500W Geared Hub Bafang
  3. Fork: Suntour Mobie A32 (75mm) vs. "Hydraulic Lockout Suspension" (100mm)
  4. Brakes: Bengal Ares 3 Hydraulic Disc (180 mm) rotors vs. Shimano Hydraulic MT200
  5. Tires: 27.5" x 2.2" Kenda Kwick vs. 27.5" x 2.4" Schwalbe Super Moto 2
  6. Spokes: Black stainless 13 gauge vs. stainless steel 12 gauge rear, 13 gauge front
  7. Rim: Double Wall aluminum 36h front and rear vs. 3D double wall rim 33 mm width
  8. Chain: KMC Z Series 8-speed vs. KMC Professional 8-speed
  9. Cassette: Shimano Acera 12-32T 8-speed vs. (Shimano Acera?) 11-32T 8-speed
  10. Shifters: Shimano Acera 8-speed Rapidfire vs. Shimano Acera 7-speed trigger shifter
  11. Lights: No lights vs. integrated front and rear lights
  12. Saddle: Aventon by Velo vs. Selle Royal Freeway Plush Gel
  13. Display: M5 LCD Smart Easy-read (b/w) display with backlight vs. Full color LCD-TFT display
  14. Weight capacity: 250 lb vs. 300 lb
  15. Sizing: Sm, Med and Lg frames vs. two sizes (smaller size is step-through model) - see more on frames below
  16. Frame: Aventon's top tube is 2" lower than Ride1Up's, allowing a lower stand-over height (this might explain why Ride1Up has a 300 lb rider capacity, while Aventon only 250 lb). Ride1Up, however, offers a step-through version (ST) which Aventon does not. Aventon comes in small, medium and large frame sizes; Ride1Up offers the two frame styles, with the step-through a bit smaller than the other option. Aventon has a slightly more aggressive stance (seat tube tilted back just a bit more than Ride1Up), and thus has a longer reach (esp in large size). An Aventon rider is leaning forward a little bit more; a Ride1Up rider is sitting up a little bit more.
  17. Price: $1600 vs. $1500
  18. (from Browneye below) Where to buy/service: available thru bike shops and online vs. available online only
Both bikes are 62 lb and include fenders and rear rack with pannier side mount.
Both are Class 3 bikes and can attain 28mph pedal assist/20 mph on throttle.

Aventon seems better equipped in the fork, spokes/rim, and frame sizing. Thumbs up to Ride1Up color display and a step-through version. Anyone offer pro and cons to the above??
 
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Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
Interesting that R1Up would cite a peak wattage of 1000 versus a nominal wattage of 500. What is that purpose ? Motors in industry are never rated that way. They also copied Aventon's language of 'continuous' versus 'peak', after they obviously saw Aventons spec materials. The marketing gimmicks and gamesmanship gets old real quick. (Sheesh it's like" Let's just baffle the heck out of all those buyers.”). At this point, given the borderline behaviors, I'd like to see someone open up the casing and verify the 35E batteries. is there a Consumers Reports for ebikes in the offing ?
 

Browneye

Well-Known Member
And both companies/importers are right here in so-Cal. Ride1Up is in San Diego, and Aventon is in City of Industry/LA.
Both provide excellent customer service, both have a good reputation.

Aventon has been at it a little longer than R1U. From what I've heard, Aventon owns their own production facilities in China - I can't say for R1U.

AFAIK Aventon is selling through local bike shops, Ride1Up is selling direct to consumer.

I'm pretty sure JUICED is in SD as well.
 

phoenixtoohot

Active Member
I don't think the new Aventon Level has changed their "non-zero speed" throttle. Manual says the rear wheels have to be turning for throttle to operate. Also, I wonder if they reduced the abrupt accel to 12 mph on PAS level 1. Ride1up has throttle from a standstill and many settings for number of PAS levels and speed at each level. Otherwise, I really like the new Level, especially because of Aventon's expanding dealer network and their own manufacturing in Asia.
 

phoenixtoohot

Active Member
Interesting that R1Up would cite a peak wattage of 1000 versus a nominal wattage of 500. What is that purpose ? Motors in industry are never rated that way. They also copied Aventon's language of 'continuous' versus 'peak', after they obviously saw Aventons spec materials. The marketing gimmicks and gamesmanship gets old real quick. (Sheesh it's like" Let's just baffle the heck out of all those buyers.”). At this point, given the borderline behaviors, I'd like to see someone open up the casing and verify the 35E batteries. is there a Consumers Reports for ebikes in the offing ?
Mike, I think RadPower continues to do this, claiming 750 watts. It's my understanding that that's the peak and the nominal, or continuous is 500 watts on all Rad bikes.
 

Browneye

Well-Known Member
Spot-on.
I test-rode both aventons and liked the 350 better than the 500. Better cuz it didn't take off so quick. Both were easy to ride and good quality - would have bought one 'till I tried the Giant. [shrug]
I probly would have eventually wanted to upgrade from the pace 350. I think it's a good value though.

Elsewhere they call them 'crappy controllers' if they start out fast. Our hub drive conversion pops up to 8mph pretty quick - not for close quarters maneuvering. I don't know why one would use assist for that anyway. Tunable controllers are a cheap upgrade.

Now I want to try a Ride1UP. 😁
 
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krdugger

Member
Man. We release the 500 Aug 2018, a few months later they release their pace 500. We release the 700 Dec 2019, a few months later they introduce this new level bike. I'll let you guys know what Aventon's new model is; we're releasing it in 2 months. :rolleyes: Nice analysis though. Aventon's bike is using a shengyi motor also btw. Also, Schwalbe > Kenda - And the wattage rating is due to the internal controller sending a peak of 22A w/ a 48V volt system. The motor's nominal rating is 500w. The potential is to send over 1000w to it, but it is still a 500w motor. (22ax48v)
 
Man. We release the 500 Aug 2018, a few months later they release their pace 500. We release the 700 Dec 2019, a few months later they introduce this new level bike. I'll let you guys know what Aventon's new model is; we're releasing it in 2 months. :rolleyes: Nice analysis though. Aventon's bike is using a shengyi motor also btw. Also, Schwalbe > Kenda - And the wattage rating is due to the internal controller sending a peak of 22A w/ a 48V volt system. The motor's nominal rating is 500w. The potential is to send over 1000w to it, but it is still a 500w motor. (22ax48v)
Thank you for the correction on the motor - I changed it in the list above to ascertain the list's accuracy. It must be a competitive business to build ebikes - no novel idea is novel for long. For those of us untied to the business of these companies, we are grateful for such competition - it drives the quality and accessibility of ebikes forward, both in terms of function and price. Congrats to both Ride1Up and Aventon for investing in the best they can put together at a far-more-reasonable price point (at least on my budget!).
 

krdugger

Member
Thanks, I definitely agree with you Josh. It's a bit of a shame to see so many aspects of our design replicated, but I do agree with you. Though it will be hard for anyone not going direct to consumer to match our prices, so we will continue the mission to offer more bike for less. To answer robrob's question. No, they are made and welded in China.
 
And both companies/importers are right here in so-Cal. Ride1Up is in San Diego, and Aventon is in City of Industry/LA.
Both provide excellent customer service, both have a good reputation.

Aventon has been at it a little longer than R1U. From what I've heard, Aventon owns their own production facilities in China - I can't say for R1U.

AFAIK Aventon is selling through local bike shops, Ride1Up is selling direct to consumer.

I'm pretty sure JUICED is in SD as well.
Selling through bike shops is a nice advantage. Sometimes, for those of us with too many thumbs and not a lot of repair experience, a local troubleshooter with maintenance/repair knowledge is a big benefit. The local shop as well can communicate directly with Aventon for advice, support, and parts. So far I have received excellent customer service from both Aventon and my local dealer on a recent Level purchase.
 
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Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
Thank you for the correction on the motor - I changed it in the list above to ascertain the list's accuracy. It must be a competitive business to build ebikes - no novel idea is novel for long. For those of us untied to the business of these companies, we are grateful for such competition - it drives the quality and accessibility of ebikes forward, both in terms of function and price. Congrats to both Ride1Up and Aventon for investing in the best they can put together at a far-more-reasonable price point (at least on my budget!).
 

Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
Man. We release the 500 Aug 2018, a few months later they release their pace 500. We release the 700 Dec 2019, a few months later they introduce this new level bike. I'll let you guys know what Aventon's new model is; we're releasing it in 2 months. :rolleyes: Nice analysis though. Aventon's bike is using a shengyi motor also btw. Also, Schwalbe > Kenda - And the wattage rating is due to the internal controller sending a peak of 22A w/ a 48V volt system. The motor's nominal rating is 500w. The potential is to send over 1000w to it, but it is still a 500w motor. (22ax48v)
Man that's some interesting bunk you are spreading there about Aventon. Fact is, they already had the Pace products being announced at CABDA Midwest in Feb 2018. Your company didn't even exist at that time. Attached are the handouts on the Pace renderings they handed out to dealers in Feb 2018 when they were originally under the Populo brand, which Aventon developed and marketed long before you were even in the industry Kevin.
 

Attachments

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Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
Another unwarranted personal attack. Sad to see Mike attack anyone, but this time the owner of a well respected e-bike business.
Seriously, it's interesting you support totally false information spread by a competitor to Aventon, who is the one on the attack. It's shameless in fact he even came on to Aventons forum to do such a thing. I called him out bc he deserved to be called out for totally false and misleading information. Your judgement in this is highly unwarranted and highly questionable.
 
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robrob

Member
I agree with Mike, he's just giving us some good info refuting the guy from the competing bike company. Why is he posting here anyway?
 

Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
I presented clear and factual evidence that what he attacked his competitor with, and even used to throw shade at them, was totally false and misleading to buyers or consumers comparing the two companies products. If you want to support a company person doing bunk like that, it says plenty about you as well. Shameless he even came onto the Aventon brand forum to do that. It's No different than creating a false review that is negative about Aventon on their website.
 
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Beautiful 60 degree late February day - taking my new Aventon Level out for another cruise wherever. The ride is smooth and incredibly enjoyable. The electric boost helps make these 58-year-old "sittin'-too-much-at-a-desk" legs feel like a teenager again. Big thumbs up!