Aventon Level vs. Ride1Up 700

krdugger

Member
I wasn't posting here to make you an enemy. I'm happy their using dealer networks and probably the reason you are in support of it/them. We're testing different business models. Buying direct online, or through local bike shops. We'll see where the future takes us, and for me it is about efficiency and increasing the options for cyclists. Re. Aventon - They can use the same designs (or not) all they want. None of these bikes designs are patented and we are using Reentions electronic integration so our frame shapes are going to be similar. It was quite apparent though that the Level design was shaped after our 700 series design. Maybe I am wrong and they had it planned from the beginning. Similarly with the pace v 500 series, we had that in the works since the start of 2018 as well. I'm not bashing them, but pointing out how much the Aventon Level seems to be a replica of our 700 series 3 mo's after our media release of that model. Could I be wrong about them copying it, maybe. I won't know the inspiration for the overall design, but it certainly seems that way. I likely wouldn't go after them legally, and again... I could be wrong, but the timing and design is suspect.
 
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krdugger

Member
You can attack me if you like, but I posted on this forum because it is also in the Ride1UP forum and I get notified. I'm sharing what I have experienced and what I know based on the evidence I have. It's a article about comparing two nearly identical models so of course it makes sense to post here. We got word a month ago that our design was copied and I do not have any evidence that they had already planned this model, but again, I do not know for sure. Anyway, it's just another option for consumers, so that's great. Competing with our price-point will be near impossible, so it's not like they are copying our bike and undercutting us.
 

Josh Warrior

New Member
Copying schmopying. If you guys - that is, the owners and designers of ebikes - aren't focused on the redesigns and new designs and components for the 2021 - 2023 editions then you will not survive the upcoming market explosion in ebikes. In business, copying is the highest form of flattery (assuming one is not stealing proprietary information); whining about copying means your focusing on what has already happened, rather than on what will be happening. Being ahead of the current fad is what distinguishes the true leaders.
 

krdugger

Member
Copying schmopying. If you guys - that is, the owners and designers of ebikes - aren't focused on the redesigns and new designs and components for the 2021 - 2023 editions then you will not survive the upcoming market explosion in ebikes. In business, copying is the highest form of flattery (assuming one is not stealing proprietary information); whining about copying means your focusing on what has already happened, rather than on what will be happening. Being ahead of the current fad is what distinguishes the true leaders.
That is how I feel feel as well. Not too worried about copying, though I do believe there is a limit to this philosophy. Generally speaking though, I completely agree and am not too worried about it. More options for the consumer, and our goal at the end of the day is more bike for less money. An efficient supply chain without all of your money going into to marketing, google ads, middle men, etc.
I hope it doesn't seem like I made this out to be some big issue. I have actually sent many customers over to Aventon when they want specifics that Aventon offers (more specific sizing, and the step-thru pace.
 

Asher

Well-Known Member
That is how I feel feel as well. Not too worried about copying, though I do believe there is a limit to this philosophy. Generally speaking though, I completely agree and am not too worried about it. More options for the consumer, and our goal at the end of the day is more bike for less money. An efficient supply chain without all of your money going into to marketing, google ads, middle men, etc.
I hope it doesn't seem like I made this out to be some big issue. I have actually sent many customers over to Aventon when they want specifics that Aventon offers (more specific sizing, and the step-thru pace.

I follow shared scooters and e-bikes, and know many people in the industry, and I can tell you that billions of dollars have been lost precisely because of hubris, because they lacked the humility that kr seems to have. Instead of trying to build a tightly run ship and accepting their low margins and generic product, they sell a big story that investors temporarily gobble up, and then go bust within a year or two. Many have no viable strategy because the only thing they got good at was selling a story, and are waiting for a corporate patron to save them

Plus, kr's e-bikes aren't as generic as the shared scooters have been, and they have a huge edge over much of the industry. Aventon is a competitive player, but the market generally hasn't done a good job of providing polished value priced Class 3 commuter e-bikes. Juiced had the crown but QC issues, slightly dated designs (big narrow wheel/tire combo) and increasing prices have weakened that.

Paying an extra $200 or $300 for an equivalently specced bike in return for a dealer network is perfectly fine, it's just you can't play both strategies as one company, and there's a place for both. There are many people who will strongly prefer one or the other (personally, I'd choose based on the specific design/spec choices, I'm willing to pay an Aventon level premium but not a Specialized one).

Plus I'm happy that Aventon and Ride are making straight up practical utilitarian ebikes, instead of chasing first the fatbike and now the super73 minibike style fads. A&R will be ready when people start using fast e-bikes for daily life en masse.
 
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