Average Cruising Speed on your e-bike

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
I think its just under 20 but not positive I only get a few more miles going 22 even when I work harder but I think thats because with the mid drive the harder I push the more the motor works.
As you are very aware, it depends on wind, weight, surface, and slope, as well as speed. Nothing is simple, but more speed eats more battery charge in a very nonlinear way. So 15mph to 20mph seems pretty reasonable.
 

fooferdoggie

Well-Known Member
As you are very aware, it depends on wind, weight, surface, and slope, as well as speed. Nothing is simple, but more speed eats more battery charge in a very nonlinear way. So 15mph to 20mph seems pretty reasonable.
yep. my watts I put out vary constantly. averages are tough my heart rate drops so much at each stop then takes a bit to get back up.
 

jabberwocky

Well-Known Member
Two recent rides on my class 3:

This was on a recent vacation, in a beach area that was absolutely dead flat (95ft over 14 miles). 21mph average. My recollection is it was a decent headwind going out, and you can see speed picked up coming back. I'll note that I had road tires on the bike for this (usually run gravel tires).
WgiXflll.jpg


A more typical ride. This route is ~65-70% unpaved (gravel or dirt). Much hillier, 3000ft of elevation over 45 miles. Riding knobby gravel tires at a lower pressure. Average speed is 16.6mph, which is on the high side for this sort of ride but I was riding after work and went further than planned and pushed hard to get home before the sun set.
jyc1yPnl.jpg


Both rides would be almost entirely in eco (the lowest assist setting). I occasionally bump up a level or two if I'm on a busy road.
 

Tinman

New Member
Region
USA
In large part it will depend on the bike and it's gearing. I have a Sondors MXS that with my out of shape body can sustain 27MPH with power assist level all the way up without great effort, but I have to pedal quick or else I'm just "ghost pedaling" with the motor doing all the work which will eat batteries. The MXS is a 14-28 freewheel and really needs a larger range for higher speed riding. I have an LX on order with a 12-34 tooth cassette that should be easier to maintain that same speed.
I put a 52 tooth sprocket up front. Worked great.
 

K PierreR

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
This is an old thread but I have some recent data. I was sitting on a picnic table 7.5 miles from home with 480' of climbing when the phone made the defcon 1 weather warning giving me just 20 minutes to beat it. I have a high windage fat bike with big 52 volt batteries with BBSHD drive. For the first time ever I put the setting at level 9 max and headed for home. There are 11 stop signs between the picnic table and home.
I averaged 27.2 mph while seeing 28-30 except on the steepest climbs. There was essentially no head wind. My power usage for those 7.5 miles was 38 watt hours per mile or 285 watt hours. That translates to pulling 1,034 battery watts average on my ride. I made it in 17 minutes. The report was accurate, I had about three minutes to spare. My range at those speeds if I did not overheat the motor would be only 53 miles. Me and the bike plus the dog was around 300 lb.
 

WilliamT

Active Member
My commute is 18 miles one way and with my dual motor setup (front geared hub and rear direct drive), I average 18-19 mph in eco mode.
I carry a lot of gear on my electric cargo so sometimes I'm running it at 210 watts on the flats, other times at 400 watts when I'm climbing steep hills. It takes me a little over 1 hr but its a lot fun. For commuting, I prefer my hub drive bikes over my mid-drives because it doesn't interfere when I'm changing gears. With my setup, I can run a 6ah battery in the front and a 17 ah battery in the rear. 90% of the time only the rear is running and the front kicks in on the hills when needed (i.e. speeds goes down).

One thing I don't like about mid-drives is that if your in the wrong gear and you throttle from a stop, you will bog down the motor. With my hub drives, I don't have that problem and can easily take off from a stop in any gear.

I also ride a regular road bike and on my smart trainer. On non electric bikes, I average around 16.5 mph

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