Avg Battery Range

kahn

Member
Region
USA
City
northWET washington
Aluminum Creo, similar body weight (unfortunately). With Range Extender, 52 very hilly with some steep pitches, miles. Had a bit less than 10% left on both batteries. The trip was 52 pedaling miles with an additional 20 or so miles on ferry boats. The profile shows the flat aspect of the boat crossings.
 

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RGVCycling

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Mission
Aluminum Creo, similar body weight (unfortunately). With Range Extender, 52 very hilly with some steep pitches, miles. Had a bit less than 10% left on both batteries. The trip was 52 pedaling miles with an additional 20 or so miles on ferry boats. The profile shows the flat aspect of the boat crossings.
That's pretty good with hills. Where I'm at it's flat but with winds to keep you company. The only ferry around here is a hand-pulled ferry that crosses the border with Mexico.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
RGV, that really depends on too many factors. The same "Class 3" Vado 5.0 (604 Wh) might give me 57 km during winter riding, up to 40 km in Turbo mode but...

I have tried riding slowly, on a group ride:
20% Eco setting -- 73% of the ride time
30% Sport setting -- 14%
50% Turbo setting -- 13%.

I rode for 5 h 22 mins net to achieve 102.5 km (63.7 mi) on the single battery (13% charge left). Something I couldn't believe before, and I have ridden my Vado for 18 months now. Note: The battery is only 92% healthy!

P.S. All on flats, mostly with gentle tailwind.
 
Last edited:

RGVCycling

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Mission
RGV, that really depends on too many factors. The same "Class 3" Vado 5.0 (604 Wh) might give me 57 km during winter riding, up to 40 km in Turbo mode but...

I have tried riding slowly, on a group ride:
20% Eco setting -- 73% of the ride time
30% Sport setting -- 14%
50% Turbo setting -- 13%.

I rode for 5 h 10 mins net to achieve 102.5 km (63.7 mi) on the single battery (13% charge left). Something I couldn't believe before, and I have ridden my Vado for 18 months now. Note: The battery is only 92% healthy!

P.S. All on flats, mostly with gentle tailwind.
63 miles is pretty good. I know the range will be negatively affected by colder temps but at least i know I can safely do 40 miles on a single charge during the summer months. This with only my weight and running mostly on Eco mode. I bump up the assist when I stop and bump it back down when I'm at cruising speed.
 

RGVCycling

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Mission
It's difficult to compare ranges of totally different bikes and drives like Como, Vado and Creo/SL drives. Or did you mean a Como SL 4.0 RGVCycling?
Y'all are overthinking this lol I'm just curious what the average distance you are getting on a full battery no matter what bike you have.
 

retiredNH

Active Member
Region
USA
Riding style has a big impact. In a different discussion, it was apparent that some folks like speed, so they're in the top power setting most of the time. Me? I like a slower pace. With my Trek Allant, I might use 15% of my power in a 14 mile ride with 1000 feet of elevation because I'm pedaling and coasting a lot of the time. I only use power going up steeper hills.

Speed is your real power drain, since wind resistance is the square of the speed - power use goes up fast. If you do loop rides like I do, wind should not be so much of a factor, since 1/2 your ride is into the wind and 1/2 is with the wind.
 

Widgets

New Member
Region
USA
City
Tampa, FL
I am 180 lbs. I have a new (3 weeks) RadPower RadCity ST. I ride casually mostly between 12 mph and 18 mph around the mostly flat mostly paved trails. I mainly stay on PAS 1, stepping up to PAS 3 on the flyovers where the trail crosses a major road. I can ride 50 miles and still show three of five bars, or 70 miles and still show two of five bars.

For my ebike, the PAS provides a somewhat fixed power level. PAS 1 provides 44 watts to 65 watts. The distance covered really depends upon how hard I peddle. The battery life is more a function of time. I have gone around 7 hours of riding on a charge.
 

RGVCycling

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Mission
I am 180 lbs. I have a new (3 weeks) RadPower RadCity ST. I ride casually mostly between 12 mph and 18 mph around the mostly flat mostly paved trails. I mainly stay on PAS 1, stepping up to PAS 3 on the flyovers where the trail crosses a major road. I can ride 50 miles and still show three of five bars, or 70 miles and still show two of five bars.

For my ebike, the PAS provides a somewhat fixed power level. PAS 1 provides 44 watts to 65 watts. The distance covered really depends upon how hard I peddle. The battery life is more a function of time. I have gone around 7 hours of riding on a charge.
Wow 70 miles. That’s pretty good. I could ride all week long on one charge.
 

RGVCycling

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Mission
Riding style has a big impact. In a different discussion, it was apparent that some folks like speed, so they're in the top power setting most of the time. Me? I like a slower pace. With my Trek Allant, I might use 15% of my power in a 14 mile ride with 1000 feet of elevation because I'm pedaling and coasting a lot of the time. I only use power going up steeper hills.

Speed is your real power drain, since wind resistance is the square of the speed - power use goes up fast. If you do loop rides like I do, wind should not be so much of a factor, since 1/2 your ride is into the wind and 1/2 is with the wind.
I use the bike for mixed use. Commuting is big but I also have weekly cycling distance goals for exercise.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove
We were just talking about range on our identical Comos ...I get about half of what he does. It depends on the rider and boost level mostly
 

RGVCycling

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Mission
Wow 70 miles. That’s pretty good. I could ride all week long on one charge.
I am 180 lbs. I have a new (3 weeks) RadPower RadCity ST. I ride casually mostly between 12 mph and 18 mph around the mostly flat mostly paved trails. I mainly stay on PAS 1, stepping up to PAS 3 on the flyovers where the trail crosses a major road. I can ride 50 miles and still show three of five bars, or 70 miles and still show two of five bars.

For my ebike, the PAS provides a somewhat fixed power level. PAS 1 provides 44 watts to 65 watts. The distance covered really depends upon how hard I peddle. The battery life is more a function of time. I have gone around 7 hours of riding on a charge.
Maybe if I get down to 180 lbs then A) I would be estatic and B) probably get the same range.
 

BarnBoy

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Pleasanton, CA
I have an old 1999 EVG that I just changed the SLA batteries to nice Laudation packs. I tested them to approx 770Wh (combined). Today I did 38.8 miles (my new record) using 453Wh (was lazy and windy!) with 55% remaining (58% after rest). At this rate I might get >60 miles. Much more if I pedal…. 🙄
Stay tuned…
-BB
Edit- heavy bike and 260lbs rider
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Y'all are overthinking this lol I'm just curious what the average distance you are getting on a full battery no matter what bike you have.
When I'm travelling at "electric" speeds of 28-32 km/h (17-20 mph) and all on flats, 57 km (35 mi) to 65 km (40 mi) is safe range for me in the warm season. However, I actually liked the idea of riding rather slowly but for longer distance, so I could be travelling light without a spare battery.
 

mschwett

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Y'all are overthinking this lol I'm just curious what the average distance you are getting on a full battery no matter what bike you have.
it’s kinda meaningless though…. It all depends how much you use the motor. I ride my creo with the motor off except for climbs over 7 or 8 percent, so I get range proportional to elevation climbed, not distance. today I rode 25.6 miles with only 1000 feet of climbing and used 6% of the battery, so it would last 400+ miles. last really big ride had more climbing, 74 miles and used 34% of the battery, so it would last about 200 miles. hardest ride ever, high altitude and mega climbs, 43.1 miles and used 65% of the battery, at that rate, only 65 miles!
 

RGVCycling

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Mission
I have an old 1999 EVG that I just changed the SLA batteries to nice Laudation packs. I tested them to approx 770Wh (combined). Today I did 38.8 miles (my new record) using 453Wh (was lazy and windy!) with 55% remaining (58% after rest). At this rate I might get >60 miles. Much more if I pedal…. 🙄
Stay tuned…
-BB
Edit- heavy bike and 260lbs rider
That's pretty good!
 

RGVCycling

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Mission
it’s kinda meaningless though…. It all depends how much you use the motor. I ride my creo with the motor off except for climbs over 7 or 8 percent, so I get range proportional to elevation climbed, not distance. today I rode 25.6 miles with only 1000 feet of climbing and used 6% of the battery, so it would last 400+ miles. last really big ride had more climbing, 74 miles and used 34% of the battery, so it would last about 200 miles. hardest ride ever, high altitude and mega climbs, 43.1 miles and used 65% of the battery, at that rate, only 65 miles!
That's what makes this interesting to me. Different topology, weather, rider weight, bike, and batteries as it is now might be completely different 10 years from now. What you are getting out of your batteries in your area are real-life examples of what someone can expect when they get their bike.

One man's junk is another's treasure :)
 

mschwett

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
That's what makes this interesting to me. Different topology, weather, rider weight, bike, and batteries as it is now might be completely different 10 years from now. What you are getting out of your batteries in your area are real-life examples of what someone can expect when they get their bike.

One man's junk is another's treasure :)
the beauty of an e-bike like the creo is that when it’s turned off …. it’s still a VERY rideable road bike. just a few pounds heavier than normal. range limited only by the rider :)
 

RGVCycling

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Mission
the beauty of an e-bike like the creo is that when it’s turned off …. it’s still a VERY rideable road bike. just a few pounds heavier than normal. range limited only by the rider :)
My Como is ridable with the power off. I just need to gear down. Sometimes it feels like I got sand-filled tires and I have to huff and puff to get things going.