Baby Boomer Feature Ebikes

romagjack

New Member
Ok, I've been riding bikes (all types) all my life. Now that I'm in my late 60's, still with good riding legs and a bad back, I'm looking for a "feature rich" bike to ride into my dotage. I'm surprised the manufacturers haven't tapped this geezer market. We have great numbers and most of us are retired and have the time and money to invest in a comfortable all around e-bike without the stigma of plowing around on a "cruiser" or three wheeler. We belong to bike clubs and do weekly 25+ mile rides regularly.

I've been happy with my Emotion City Wave (with throttle) but would like something that looks more aggressive with more features (something that Elon Musk might engineer). I'm intrigued by lots of features on different bikes (especially the new ones coming out soon), but none seem to put them all together in my "dream bike," at least just yet.

Features that my generation would be willing to pay for:
  1. Reasonably upright posture with fairly comfortable seat with full suspension and IGH and Gates belt drive. (Like the R & M Delite )
  2. Automatic electronic shifting like the Shimano Steps system that downshifts in city traffic. (Like the Wallerang)
  3. Throttle (I like to ride hard for fitness for as many miles as I can and then "throttle home" when tired). Why can't Bosche or the others make throttles for the US market?).
Am I asking too much?
 

emco5

Active Member
> Am I asking too much?

For a mass production run, you probably are. At our age, it's a dying market. ;-)

You can get a throttle with the Bafang mid-drive systems. Find a comfy standard bike and add as much of the fluff as you can, then fit a Bafang mid.
 

Tbone

Member
You're not asking for too much. I've found that bikes are all about compromise anyway. You're always gonna have issues with bikes, whether it's about components, geometry or, if it matters, colours. Why should e-bikes be any different? The thing that turns me off with bikes in general is that it always feels like the components that make up the bike are all their own industry. Perhaps this is what makes them so expensive.

Here in Germany boomers are eating up e-bikes. I see them mostly on step-thru e-bikes that all look incredibly comfortable. I don't like step-thrus because of the frame flex. I've yet to ride an e-bike with a throttle so can't say much about that. Since I like to pedal, it's not an issue. At 53 and a bit overweight (German Bier!!!), I have strong legs (thanks to my other ride: a Giant cross racer that I ride 60km 3xweek along the Rhine river).

I just ordered a R&M Charger GX Touring that is replacing our second car, which we sold last year. These bikes have long delivery times. I'm not getting it till, they say, end of April. I not only plan to tour with it but I will be doing all local shopping with it (it has plenty of bag space) and commuting once or twice a week 30km to a nearby city. My wife (50) is either gonna get a Charger Mixte or a Nevo from R&M which she'll use on our long weekend e-bike tours. And since we'll both have bikes with the same battery (Bosch) and I ride more, I'll be using her battery to double my distance when she's not riding. Reducing our lifestyle to owning only one car has helped justify buying premium e-bikes. After researching and doing lots of shopping, it's taken me over a year to decide 1) to buy an e-bike and 2) which one to buy. For me, this is a very serious tool that I plan on using for both business and pleasure.

Safe riding.

-t
 

romagjack

New Member
You're not asking for too much. I've found that bikes are all about compromise anyway. You're always gonna have issues with bikes, whether it's about components, geometry or, if it matters, colours. Why should e-bikes be any different? The thing that turns me off with bikes in general is that it always feels like the components that make up the bike are all their own industry. Perhaps this is what makes them so expensive.

Here in Germany boomers are eating up e-bikes. I see them mostly on step-thru e-bikes that all look incredibly comfortable. I don't like step-thrus because of the frame flex. I've yet to ride an e-bike with a throttle so can't say much about that. Since I like to pedal, it's not an issue. At 53 and a bit overweight (German Bier!!!), I have strong legs (thanks to my other ride: a Giant cross racer that I ride 60km 3xweek along the Rhine river).

I just ordered a R&M Charger GX Touring that is replacing our second car, which we sold last year. These bikes have long delivery times. I'm not getting it till, they say, end of April. I not only plan to tour with it but I will be doing all local shopping with it (it has plenty of bag space) and commuting once or twice a week 30km to a nearby city. My wife (50) is either gonna get a Charger Mixte or a Nevo from R&M which she'll use on our long weekend e-bike tours. And since we'll both have bikes with the same battery (Bosch) and I ride more, I'll be using her battery to double my distance when she's not riding. Reducing our lifestyle to owning only one car has helped justify buying premium e-bikes. After researching and doing lots of shopping, it's taken me over a year to decide 1) to buy an e-bike and 2) which one to buy. For me, this is a very serious tool that I plan on using for both business and pleasure.

Safe riding.

-t
I like your thinking. Good choice of bike. I also like to pedal also, but so many times starting form a dead stop I find that the throttle helps get me going faster and safer. I hope you'll keep the forum updated on you new purchase.
 

TrevorB

Active Member
With hub gears you should ways be able to start off in a low get. Combine Shimano Steps with their Di2 Hub and bike will do gear changes for you.
 

ranny_v

New Member
Regarding the comment about fitting a bafang mid-drive to the bike of your choice - the bafang is a very different riding experience than the Bosch/shimano/impulse/brose mid drives we see on designed from the ground up ebikes. Bafang uses a cadence sensor to determine assist levels, so it's not as natural feeling as a torque sensor found on Bosch-like systems. And the bafang system can be MUCH more powerful than Bosch and friends. I've had bothe and am currently using the bafang system. I like it, but it would not meet the needs of every rider. I will say that it's been surprisingly reliable. And from a performance perspective, it will blow away the Bosch and Bosch like systems. But that is not to say it is superior in every way. And finally, yes, it can be fitted with a throttle.
 

emco5

Active Member
....Bafang uses a cadence sensor to determine assist levels, so it's not as natural feeling as a torque sensor found on Bosch-like systems....I've had both and am currently using the bafang system...

Please, would you elaborate a bit on the two riding experiences and your reasons for choosing the Bafang mid. From what I've been reading around the net, the Bosch/Shimano 250w OEM systems might get you up the same hills but at a slower speed [and likely with more effort].