bafang 750 watt hub motor,

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Hubs require heavy spokes and extra-strong rims for good reasons. It is easier to change a flat on a mid-drive. Would you rather put a chain on a mid-drive than change a flat on a hub-drive?
How to build a hub-drive at home.
Like arguing with a woman. When they start loosing the original argument, they change the topic in hopes they'll have a better chance on the new one.

Not here either (heavy spokes and extra strong rims). Maybe as compared to a regular bicycle? Even the least expensive bikes come with pretty sturdy running gear. That's a non event.....

Flat's easier to change... So what? You want to use that for your buying decision then go for it. Somebody that's done it half a dozen times can do one easily in an hour. I'm a fat old man and I can do one in less than half an hour (tube, tire, or both!) ...

I don't have to worry about getting home after breaking something in the drive train either, like a chain for instance.
 

cmugler

Member
Region
USA
I have been using hub motors for years, they only add about 7 or 8 pounds of weight,subtract the weight of hat the midrive would add to the rear wheen and it is not significant, if you are 250 pounds vs 150 pounds that has more impact so factor in your body wei
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ght if you want to jump curbs regardless of hub or mid drives
 

m@Robertson

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
So many misconceptions. I may as well show up and piss off everyone.

Hub motors are easy to fix flats on. Sure you have to deal with a torque arm, but only if you pull the wheel, which is almost never necessary. I include a short wrench in my tool kit and thats good enough for a roadside tire repair. But normally I don't want to work that hard. I leave the tire in place, try and find a shady spot on grass or against a wall out of the sun, then lay the bike down, unseat one bead only and pull the tube out the side. I won't describe the process of finding/patching the hole you all know that. After patching, I stuff the tube back into the still mounted tire, seat the bead and pump back up. Done for every kind of flat except the kind that makes me install a replacement tube, which I also carry because experienced bike commuter.
IMG_20180623_123127.jpg

This was on a bike stand but I've done it countless times roadside. Hub motor, tube being repaired and wheel is still on the bike. This was a Slime Repair Saturday where I substituted slow-dribbling Slime holes for proper permanent patches. I use FlatOut Sportsman now which seals forever, dry.

What else?
Hub motors do not intrinsically require heavy spokes or rims. EVERY wheel build requires heavy rims if you are going to ride around at Class 3 speeds on pavement. I use double-wall fat rims, or carbon fiber deep dish, or on nonfat bikes I try and pick downhill rims like a DT FR560 (29er), or a Sun Ringle MTX39 (26") or Alienation Black Sheep (20"). I do these for hubs or mid drives in equal measure. As for spokes what you need are quality spokes. A strong rim is a flexible rim and using overly stiff spokes like straight, non-butted 12-gauge is going to create a rim that breaks rather than flexes thru a problem. My almost-8000-mile hub rims use quality butted DT Champion 2.0 spokes. Thats 13 gauge. My c/f fat rims: Sapim Strongs. Not the thicker E-Strong either. Now, if you are going with a 3kw+ QSV3 direct drive hub then sure do a moped rim and spokes on that 50 mph bike. But a Class 3 ebike? Build it with quality components and have at it. You'll be fine.

Worth noting: I had a low opinion of the Sondors 80mm single-wall rims with their 14 ga spokes, but being a mod on the FB user group has let me see that over the years they have almost zero wheel failures, even though they are selling the bigfoot full size 750w motors with 48v batteries and 25a controllers, with members back in the day commonly adding in 35a controllers and 52v batteries. I thought they'd be getting wobbly wheels right and left. It never happened. There being many many cycling noobs there has resulted in some issues for sure, but only a few.

And chains? Mid drives require a proper chain. Thats on the builder. KMC 'e' chains and job done. Or the SRAM 'e' chain. And yes they cost real money. Regardless, ALWAYS carry a spare chain and a couple quick links. You are rolling again in 10 minutes if you repair with your mini Park chainbreaker, or 2 minutes if you just put on a new one with a quick link.

But first and foremost - and this is unavoidable - if the rider learns how to ride a mid drive they never break things.

 
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kmccune

Active Member
Like arguing with a woman. When they start loosing the original argument, they change the topic in hopes they'll have a better chance on the new one.

Not here either (heavy spokes and extra strong rims). Maybe as compared to a regular bicycle? Even the least expensive bikes come with pretty sturdy running gear. That's a non event.....

Flat's easier to change... So what? You want to use that for your buying decision then go for it. Somebody that's done it half a dozen times can do one easily in an hour. I'm a fat old man and I can do one in less than half an hour (tube, tire, or both!) ...

I don't have to worry about getting home after breaking something in the drive train either, like a chain for instance.
You can actually buy an innertube from Huffy that is like a sectioned torus rather than a full torus.It even has a knob on one end and a receptacle on the other.