Battery Cost: $1,299

jangles

Active Member
Affordable priced electric bikes direct from Manufacturer – EUNORAU ELECTRIC BIKES (eunorau-ebike.com)
There have always been bikes that are cheaper than Juiced that lack a torque sensor. However, with my road bike background, I’ve never had the desire to buy a cadence sensing-only bike. I’m on my original 2016 Cross Current and should close out 2021 with 25k miles on it. I’ve had some issues but have always been able to sort them out myself and there are still ample parts out there for the bike which can’t be said for a lot of proprietary big bike brands 4+ years old.
My wifes BTN has a torque sensor , $1095 .
 

jangles

Active Member
Which model competes with the Cross Current S2 and offers more features for less money? The only BTN‘s I see at that price point are you’re run-of-the-mill hub motor e-bike with cadence sensing only.
I never said they compete with the cc . Dont put words in my posts . The E-torqe has torqe sensing as do some of the mid drives .
Edit : Seem they went up 100 .
 

Dunbar

Well-Known Member
I never said they compete with the cc . Dont put words in my posts . The E-torqe has torqe sensing as do some of the mid drives .
Edit : Seem they went up 100 .

Ok, so it costs less but offers less in terms of features (smaller battery, mechanical discs, 20mph, no brake cutoff switches, lower end shifter/derailleur etc). That’s fine but doesn’t really prove that there are better value e-bikes out there. Just that there are less expensive ones. AFAIK, Juiced used a bottom-bracket torque sensor early on but switched to the TMM4 clones about five years ago because they offer better performance and allow higher resolution cadence & torque sensing.
 
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mjorg

Member
How does Rize look for the bike you might want? Batteries are much more modestly priced.
Actually, that's the brand I was referring to in my "last" message. In fact I just looked and it you who wrote about it. Thank you very much! It looks very good to me. I would still like a 52 volt battery. Seems like it would cause there to be more low end.
 

Asher

Well-Known Member
Ok, so it costs less but offers less in terms of features (smaller battery, mechanical discs, 20mph, no brake cutoff switches, lower end shifter/derailleur etc). That’s fine but doesn’t really prove that there are better value e-bikes out there. Just that there are less expensive ones. AFAIK, Juiced used a bottom-bracket torque sensor early on but switched to the TMM4 clones about five years ago because they offer better performance and allow higher resolution cadence & torque sensing.

In the under $2k market, I only find that the Ride1Up LMTD rivals Juiced for a torque sensing, non-fat tire model. Everything else costs more or has some major compromises. The Rize Rize has 7 speeds, one size, and a dated frame design like Juiced.

People go on as if there's lots of choice now, but there really isn't for a $2k class 3 torque sensing commuter model.
 

Dunbar

Well-Known Member
Looks interesting. I would love to fit 2.4” Moto X’s on my Cross Current. I’m not sure how well those bottom bracket torque sensors work though. Seems like an older technology to be using at at this point. They use a non-proprietary battery which is good for future serviceability. I would definitely give that bike some consideration if I were buying now. I was kind of hoping that there would be better mid-drive options in the 750-1000W power range at under $2k at this point almost five years since getting my Cross Current for <$2k.
 

Handlebars

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
Actually, that's the brand I was referring to in my "last" message. In fact I just looked and it you who wrote about it. Thank you very much! It looks very good to me. I would still like a 52 volt battery. Seems like it would cause there to be more low end.
From what I hear, once you have enough power to go up hills where you ride, the price usually attached to getting that higher voltage isn't as valuable for ordinary cruising around as much as getting higher Ah (for longer range) is.
Someone will correct this if it's wrong, I'm sure.
Anyway, that's why I only look for a bigger 48V battery in addition to my 17Ah. I'd like 30 Ah but will settle for 20Ah.
I'd prefer to have the low end on my bike REDUCED to save energy. It takes off from stopped with a little jolt forward whereas I would coordinate my pedalling with the throttle if it were a smoother take-off on throttle.
I like big range without pedalling hard all the way, I don't care how fast the take off is that much. Not as much as going way further at a decent speed. Say 15 mph 100 miles.
 
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tomjasz

Well-Known Member
Kevin Fang is one of them . If you look on Boltons site he rebadges 50 percent of his bike from them . I'm going to bed , rest well .
Not a fan of either. We went out of our way to assist Kevin only to be disappointed. Rebranded BTN. ARGH! But we all do what floats our own boat. Ride it like you stole it! Sleep well!
 

jangles

Active Member
Not a fan of either. We went out of our way to assist Kevin only to be disappointed. Rebranded BTN. ARGH! But we all do what floats our own boat. Ride it like you stole it! Sleep well!
Good morning , who is we ? Yes the language barrier is crappy . Just to get it straight I am not pushing them or anyone else I just happen to have two of their bikes I am happy with .
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
I was absolutely going to buy a juiced bike. Then I dropped one of the batteries for my present bike and had to replace it (cost $399). I would be buying Juiced to get the big battery so I wouldn't have to carry a second. So, after this event I wanted to see how much a Juiced battery would cost. They cost $1,299 dollars (1/2021). A while back I priced them at $899, which I though was just a little high. But $1,299? I think that price is really, really high. I paid around $1,100 for my present 1,000 watt bike. It works really well for me. I want to give it to my wife to get her into e-bikes, and then get a new one for myself. After accidently destroying a bike battery I realize that it can happen. But in any case you may need to replace batteries over time if you are an avid rider. So, Juiced bikes are off my list. I did talk to Juiced bikes about this, explaining that cost of ownership is always a consideration on consumables such as batteries. They said they had no control over the pricing. Which makes me wonder if this is another company that is "actually" controlled by mainland China. Which l want to avoid, because I want representation here in the US. I want real, timely support (without having to send photographs). I didn't actually "talk" to Juiced bikes. We only communicated by email. It took a few days for them to respond to my initial email...to their sales department. I wonder how quickly responses would come for warranty issues...?
Your post brings up another point. Buying a battery to replace one that gets damaged is one thing but keeping it safe in the first place is another factor to consider. These batteries are expensive, heavy, awkward to handle and can be dangerous when damaged. I know several riders who have damaged their batteries by carrying them loose on the back seat. A sudden stop sends them flying, cracking the case or worse in the process.

IMO, it's worth spending a few $$ on a sturdy carrying case. I use this one from Nanuk to carry two of my Pedego batteries:

P1070664a.jpg P1070665a.jpg P1070667a.jpg

There's even enough room for the charger

P1070670a.jpg
 

mjorg

Member
From what I hear, once you have enough power to go up hills where you ride, the price usually attached to getting that higher voltage isn't as valuable for ordinary cruising around as much as getting higher Ah (for longer range) is.
Someone will correct this if it's wrong, I'm sure.
Anyway, that's why I only look for a bigger 48V battery in addition to my 17Ah. I'd like 30 Ah but will settle for 20Ah.
I'd prefer to have the low end on my bike REDUCED to save energy. It takes off from stopped with a little jolt forward whereas I would coordinate my pedalling with the throttle if it were a smoother take-off on throttle.
I like big range without pedalling hard all the way, I don't care how fast the take off is that much. Not as much as going way further at a decent speed. Say 15 mph 100 miles.

I will get two batteries for any bike I might buy. I need the range. If I ride in the mountains I also have to have more low end. Frequently I get part of the way up a small but steep incline and I stall. My bike is loaded with supplies and water. I even carry an ultra-light foldable chair since covid. When I stall mid climb it can result in a fall. Which isn't good given the weight of the things I carry. My Ecotric Seagull was advertised as 1,000 watts, but it's direct drive and so I bet I can get much more out of a Bafang 750 watt motor. I like my bike but I also bet that 1,000 watts is overrated. It's interesting that you don't like the surge of low end on your bike. What brand is it? I really like how quiet my bike is. I wonder if Bafang gear noise is going to ruin sneaking up on wild animals. Maybe if I gain low end I'll also gain...to much noise. It's funny, I used to drive motorcycle. On them you need to keep pace with traffic to avoid getting rear ended. I enjoy e-bikes because you can safely go 15 and drink in the scenery without the fear of death. So 15 mph over 100 miles sounds good to me too.
 

jangles

Active Member
I will get two batteries for any bike I might buy. I need the range. If I ride in the mountains I also have to have more low end. Frequently I get part of the way up a small but steep incline and I stall. My bike is loaded with supplies and water. I even carry an ultra-light foldable chair since covid. When I stall mid climb it can result in a fall. Which isn't good given the weight of the things I carry. My Ecotric Seagull was advertised as 1,000 watts, but it's direct drive and so I bet I can get much more out of a Bafang 750 watt motor. I like my bike but I also bet that 1,000 watts is overrated. It's interesting that you don't like the surge of low end on your bike. What brand is it? I really like how quiet my bike is. I wonder if Bafang gear noise is going to ruin sneaking up on wild animals. Maybe if I gain low end I'll also gain...to much noise. It's funny, I used to drive motorcycle. On them you need to keep pace with traffic to avoid getting rear ended. I enjoy e-bikes because you can safely go 15 and drink in the scenery without the fear of death. So 15 mph over 100 miles sounds good to me too.
I dont know where you go other than south mountain but if you want to climb you need a mid drive bike .
 

Handlebars

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
I will get two batteries for any bike I might buy. I need the range. If I ride in the mountains I also have to have more low end. Frequently I get part of the way up a small but steep incline and I stall. My bike is loaded with supplies and water. I even carry an ultra-light foldable chair since covid. When I stall mid climb it can result in a fall. Which isn't good given the weight of the things I carry. My Ecotric Seagull was advertised as 1,000 watts, but it's direct drive and so I bet I can get much more out of a Bafang 750 watt motor. I like my bike but I also bet that 1,000 watts is overrated. It's interesting that you don't like the surge of low end on your bike. What brand is it? I really like how quiet my bike is. I wonder if Bafang gear noise is going to ruin sneaking up on wild animals. Maybe if I gain low end I'll also gain...to much noise. It's funny, I used to drive motorcycle. On them you need to keep pace with traffic to avoid getting rear ended. I enjoy e-bikes because you can safely go 15 and drink in the scenery without the fear of death. So 15 mph over 100 miles sounds good to me too.
I have the Sparkbikes City, it's the older version of the Rizebikes City. Only rated 45 nm torque 48V 500W. It;'s not that it has huge pickup, it's not bad, but it lurches forward a bit when the throttle first engages. That is what I could do without - just a smoother take off.
 

mjorg

Member
I have the Sparkbikes City, it's the older version of the Rizebikes City. Only rated 45 nm torque 48V 500W. It;'s not that it has huge pickup, it's not bad, but it lurches forward a bit when the throttle first engages. That is what I could do without - just a smoother take off.
Wonder why Sparkbikes would go out of business an then Rize appears and appears to be connected. I like the Rize a lot. But they have to stay in business or you are screwed. For electric vehicles to be viable, at some point there has to be a standard battery that you could exchange at charging stores. That way a company going out of business doesn't end your bike. My direct drive has no lurch at all on the flats. But, there has been times when I've been taken it into the mountains that there has been lurches that almost caused a bad trip down the mountain. Lurching is really dangerous at the wrong moment in the hills.
 

mjorg

Member
I dont know where you go other than south mountain but if you want to climb you need a mid drive bike .
I also need class 2. The best part about e-biking in a city is when they allow them on park trails as they do in Phoenix. I don't want to just peddle, so class 1 won't work for me. The power bandwidth of my present rear hub from 0 to 20 mph is pretty effective. I worry that shifting might take away from the mindless fun. Then your chain becomes a vulnerability too. BUT, a Yamaha e-bike is enticing...
 

Handlebars

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
Wonder why Sparkbikes would go out of business an then Rize appears and appears to be connected. I like the Rize a lot. But they have to stay in business or you are screwed. For electric vehicles to be viable, at some point there has to be a standard battery that you could exchange at charging stores. That way a company going out of business doesn't end your bike. My direct drive has no lurch at all on the flats. But, there has been times when I've been taken it into the mountains that there has been lurches that almost caused a bad trip down the mountain. Lurching is really dangerous at the wrong moment in the hills.
They were Canadian sales but expanded into USA. Internationally there is already bikes called "Spark". So,the name change.