Battery Cost: $1,299

mjorg

Member
They were Canadian sales but expanded into USA. Internationally there is already bikes called "Spark". So,the name change.
They are my bike of interest now. Thanks so much for the lead. But, I'm also considering getting a recumbent. My back is shot. Did the longest bike ride I've ever done, yesterday. Really hurt...
 

tomjasz

Well-Known Member
They are my bike of interest now. Thanks so much for the lead. But, I'm also considering getting a recumbent. My back is shot. Did the longest bike ride I've ever done, yesterday. Really hurt...
Flat foot frames solved my hand and back pain.
 

hyusufi

New Member
I was absolutely going to buy a juiced bike. Then I dropped one of the batteries for my present bike and had to replace it (cost $399). I would be buying Juiced to get the big battery so I wouldn't have to carry a second. So, after this event I wanted to see how much a Juiced battery would cost. They cost $1,299 dollars (1/2021). A while back I priced them at $899, which I though was just a little high. But $1,299? I think that price is really, really high. I paid around $1,100 for my present 1,000 watt bike. It works really well for me. I want to give it to my wife to get her into e-bikes, and then get a new one for myself. After accidently destroying a bike battery I realize that it can happen. But in any case you may need to replace batteries over time if you are an avid rider. So, Juiced bikes are off my list. I did talk to Juiced bikes about this, explaining that cost of ownership is always a consideration on consumables such as batteries. They said they had no control over the pricing. Which makes me wonder if this is another company that is "actually" controlled by mainland China. Which l want to avoid, because I want representation here in the US. I want real, timely support (without having to send photographs). I didn't actually "talk" to Juiced bikes. We only communicated by email. It took a few days for them to respond to my initial email...to their sales department. I wonder how quickly responses would come for warranty issues...?
I agree with you with the outrageous price for the 52V 19ah. Mine is working just fine now but eventually would need a replacement. I contacted AliExpress and i even sent them a picture of the battery i have to see if they can build or carry something like it. Unfortunately, they don't have the same battery casing as juiced batteries.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
I agree with you with the outrageous price for the 52V 19ah. Mine is working just fine now but eventually would need a replacement. I contacted AliExpress and i even sent them a picture of the battery i have to see if they can build or carry something like it. Unfortunately, they don't have the same battery casing as juiced batteries.
Does Luyuan have that battery?

I know Juiced switched to their manufacture from Luyuan to somewhere else about a year ago, but Luyuan might still have access to it?
I don't know.

 

snakedoctor

New Member
Region
USA
I agree with you with the outrageous price for the 52V 19ah. Mine is working just fine now but eventually would need a replacement. I contacted AliExpress and i even sent them a picture of the battery i have to see if they can build or carry something like it. Unfortunately, they don't have the same battery casing as juiced batteries.
There's someone on eBay selling some kind of dual battery connection kit. I know its not ideal but it could work when the original battery dies? I was trying to look at alternatives as well as I feel like $1200 is incredibly steep for a $2400 bike. I wanted to find options so I could figure out a solution before mine dies or doesn't hold charge. I just bought my bike so I shouldn't have to worry about it but I already get range anxiety even though my rides are fairly short.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
There's someone on eBay selling some kind of dual battery connection kit. I know its not ideal but it could work when the original battery dies? I was trying to look at alternatives as well as I feel like $1200 is incredibly steep for a $2400 bike. I wanted to find options so I could figure out a solution before mine dies or doesn't hold charge. I just bought my bike so I shouldn't have to worry about it but I already get range anxiety even though my rides are fairly short.
To relieve "range anxiety", I carry this cordless tool battery adapter and a spare 60V tool battery in my rack bag. I wired a connector into the controller battery feed and just plug it in if I run low on juice. I can rely on it to give me around 12 extra miles.
714wWY5WK+L._AC_SL1500_.jpg 61aThHjfHgL._AC_SL1500_.jpg




In my case, I use DeWalt since I have a collection of their tools & batteries but adapters are available for almost any tool battery brand.
 

Ndogo

New Member
Region
USA
I was absolutely going to buy a juiced bike. Then I dropped one of the batteries for my present bike and had to replace it (cost $399). I would be buying Juiced to get the big battery so I wouldn't have to carry a second. So, after this event I wanted to see how much a Juiced battery would cost. They cost $1,299 dollars (1/2021). A while back I priced them at $899, which I though was just a little high. But $1,299? I think that price is really, really high. I paid around $1,100 for my present 1,000 watt bike. It works really well for me. I want to give it to my wife to get her into e-bikes, and then get a new one for myself. After accidently destroying a bike battery I realize that it can happen. But in any case you may need to replace batteries over time if you are an avid rider. So, Juiced bikes are off my list. I did talk to Juiced bikes about this, explaining that cost of ownership is always a consideration on consumables such as batteries. They said they had no control over the pricing. Which makes me wonder if this is another company that is "actually" controlled by mainland China. Which l want to avoid, because I want representation here in the US. I want real, timely support (without having to send photographs). I didn't actually "talk" to Juiced bikes. We only communicated by email. It took a few days for them to respond to my initial email...to their sales department. I wonder how quickly responses would come for warranty issues...?

I bought one of these for my cross current s and it works great! $375
 

Cyklefanatic

Well-Known Member
I was absolutely going to buy a juiced bike. Then I dropped one of the batteries for my present bike and had to replace it (cost $399). I would be buying Juiced to get the big battery so I wouldn't have to carry a second. So, after this event I wanted to see how much a Juiced battery would cost. They cost $1,299 dollars (1/2021). A while back I priced them at $899, which I though was just a little high. But $1,299? I think that price is really, really high. I paid around $1,100 for my present 1,000 watt bike. It works really well for me. I want to give it to my wife to get her into e-bikes, and then get a new one for myself. After accidently destroying a bike battery I realize that it can happen. But in any case you may need to replace batteries over time if you are an avid rider. So, Juiced bikes are off my list. I did talk to Juiced bikes about this, explaining that cost of ownership is always a consideration on consumables such as batteries. They said they had no control over the pricing. Which makes me wonder if this is another company that is "actually" controlled by mainland China. Which l want to avoid, because I want representation here in the US. I want real, timely support (without having to send photographs). I didn't actually "talk" to Juiced bikes. We only communicated by email. It took a few days for them to respond to my initial email...to their sales department. I wonder how quickly responses would come for warranty issues...?
Another option for replacement batteries is getting the case repackaged with new batteries. You can choose the cells you want and the cost is less than half of what a new factory unit costs. There are many shops doing this now.
 

hyusufi

New Member
Another option for replacement batteries is getting the case repackaged with new batteries. You can choose the cells you want and the cost is less than half of what a new factory unit costs. There are many shops doing this now.
Can you share the name of the shops/websites?
 

mjorg

Member
This issue is moot for me. I purchased a Sondors MXS and got it this week (based on the review on this wonderful site). I did look into getting my old bike's batteries rebuilt. Thought it was a little pricey.
 

snakedoctor

New Member
Region
USA
Another option for replacement batteries is getting the case repackaged with new batteries. You can choose the cells you want and the cost is less than half of what a new factory unit costs. There are many shops doing this now.
Please do share the names of these shops. I’m interested to know.
 

m@Robertson

Active Member
Region
USA
This issue is moot for me. I purchased a Sondors MXS and got it this week (based on the review on this wonderful site). I did look into getting my old bike's batteries rebuilt. Thought it was a little pricey.
As you and @Asher surmised, the Sondors batteries are priced opposite the usual manufacturer strategy on proprietary packs: They are almost too cheap to be believed. A 48v 17.5ah triangle battery is priced at $399. Inside, they typically use either LG or Samsung cells. You can tell by reading the label on the side of the pack. Best guess in the Sondors community as to why the packs are so cheap is either that Storm Sondors is a true believer in ebikes (he is) or he is trying to be disruptive in their pricing as he was with the bikes originally, or the company was trying to kill off the aftermarket battery suppliers that were making a killing upgrading to 20ah triangles from the old 8-11ah bottles they originally used. Since those guys are mostly all gone and its been years, and the prices never increased... its anyone's guess what the real story is.

There is no such thing as a free lunch though. Pop open one of these cases and you will see lots of free space inside. So not space efficient for small triangles. But more of interest is the fact these packs are meant to be used with 25a controllers, so they have a 30-35a continuous BMS and thats it. Also they use an output plug that is not unique but is tough to get on the open market. Its not as easy as cutting off the wires and splicing on an xt60 because the plug is flush mount to the case. Lastly the charge input is your basic 2.5mm pin so you are going to be charging at 2-3a tops.

But if you are handy and budget is critical, its hard to find a pack with name-brand cells for this kind of money.
 

mjorg

Member
As you and @Asher surmised, the Sondors batteries are priced opposite the usual manufacturer strategy on proprietary packs: They are almost too cheap to be believed. A 48v 17.5ah triangle battery is priced at $399. Inside, they typically use either LG or Samsung cells. You can tell by reading the label on the side of the pack. Best guess in the Sondors community as to why the packs are so cheap is either that Storm Sondors is a true believer in ebikes (he is) or he is trying to be disruptive in their pricing as he was with the bikes originally, or the company was trying to kill off the aftermarket battery suppliers that were making a killing upgrading to 20ah triangles from the old 8-11ah bottles they originally used. Since those guys are mostly all gone and its been years, and the prices never increased... its anyone's guess what the real story is.

There is no such thing as a free lunch though. Pop open one of these cases and you will see lots of free space inside. So not space efficient for small triangles. But more of interest is the fact these packs are meant to be used with 25a controllers, so they have a 30-35a continuous BMS and thats it. Also they use an output plug that is not unique but is tough to get on the open market. Its not as easy as cutting off the wires and splicing on an xt60 because the plug is flush mount to the case. Lastly the charge input is your basic 2.5mm pin so you are going to be charging at 2-3a tops.

But if you are handy and budget is critical, its hard to find a pack with name-brand cells for this kind of money.
This bike is really nice. I'm thinking Sondors is a pretty great guy. Maybe the Elon Musk of two wheels. His new motorcycle is amazing for the price.
 

Bubba zanetti

Active Member
Region
Canada
City
Trail, BC
Wonder why Sparkbikes would go out of business an then Rize appears and appears to be connected. I like the Rize a lot. But they have to stay in business or you are screwed. For electric vehicles to be viable, at some point there has to be a standard battery that you could exchange at charging stores. That way a company going out of business doesn't end your bike. My direct drive has no lurch at all on the flats. But, there has been times when I've been taken it into the mountains that there has been lurches that almost caused a bad trip down the mountain. Lurching is really dangerous at the wrong moment in the hills.
One of the best things about Rize, for me is that there is no proprietary formula. Everything is off the shelf. I can buy everything for this bike elsewhere. With the Bafang motor, you can customize it completely. It’s quite tunable
 

m@Robertson

Active Member
Region
USA
This bike is really nice. I'm thinking Sondors is a pretty great guy. Maybe the Elon Musk of two wheels. His new motorcycle is amazing for the price.
I had an Original (the very first fatty with the bottle battery) and when they came out with the MXS I thought it was what the Thin should have been all along. Thats the most versatile bike they ever produced, and one hell of a value if you tally up all the parts. If I hadn't gone on to go and build my own bikes frame-up I would have bought one myself.
 

mjorg

Member
One of the best things about Rize, for me is that there is no proprietary formula. Everything is off the shelf. I can buy everything for this bike elsewhere. With the Bafang motor, you can customize it completely. It’s quite tunable
Rize looks really nice. Their batteries were a little high for me. I came close to getting one.