Best tire spoons?

Scarlet/Fire

Active Member
Region
USA
Any recommendations for the better brand or style of tire changing tools? Thanks! Swapping out my maxxis high roller 2s for Shwalbe moto x 27.5X2.8 - plastic road bike spoons are definitely not up to this task-Thanks!
 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Petaluma, CA
Super Moto X is amazing. You can get the ones for motorcycles on eBay that have long handles. The real issue is technique. Press the side you want out, in all the way around before you start. The make sure the side opposite of where you are levering is pushed in toward the center, deeper, side of the rim. Works like magic.
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Any recommendations for the better brand or style of tire changing tools? Thanks! Swapping out my maxxis high roller 2s for Shwalbe moto x 27.5X2.8 - plastic road bike spoons are definitely not up to this task-Thanks!
These are excellent


These are good and bargain priced

 

stanmiller

Active Member
I like Pedro's.

More important, follow PedalUma's advice and pinch the tire to the center of the rim.
 

m@Robertson

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Great way to shred a tube
oh my God yes! Its almost like trying to rip the tube.

As for the tire levers, after a whole lot of trial and error, I use as a first choice the Pedros (yellow) levers linked above. They are cheap; but effective, and when they break under an extreme tire job, I'm not so sad about them.

For the tough jobs, the Park TL-6.2 levers are the best of the metal levers where you can carry them and they have enough plastic covering to prevent too much rim damage, and possibly avoid all rim damage. Amazon tells me I own five sets of them which sounds about right as I have a set in most of my bike toolbags except the ones running tubeless.

But when the chips are REALLY down, and its time to take no prisoners, I keep one of these in each toolkit where the rims are especially difficult (usually a tubeless rim with a tubed tire on it).


These are motorcycle tire spoons and they are freaking serious. To get them on without scoring your rim, you put them in sideways and rotate them perpendicular, then be vewwwwy vewwwwy caweful. So far I have found nothing that can deny them.

 

tomjasz

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Minnesnowta
I use similar from my Vespa years. But my Serra’s ties went on with arthritic hands. Continental tires I find need MC spoons. Kenda and the short plastic are sufficient.
 

smorgasbord

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Park has two different levers - the TL-6.2 Steel-Core mentioned above and the TL-1.2, which are cheaper so probably not steel cored. Thoughts?
 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Petaluma, CA
@smogasbord, Levers are rarely needed when you do it right. Rims are narrowest to the center. Suspend the wheel by the deflated tire. Pinch the bottom to the center. Move that pinch up the right and left, twice. This will give you a gap at the top to extract. Some tubeless tires will require a lever at the final step. But, remembering to keep it centered will be most helpful. That is the slack you want. It is not by force. Finesse is all it takes. Like a ballet dancer, make it look easy.
1674625943927.jpeg
 

smorgasbord

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
@smogasbord, Levers are rarely needed when you do it right. Rims are narrowest to the center. Suspend the wheel by the deflated tire. Pinch the bottom to the center. Move that pinch up the right and left, twice. This will give you a gap at the top to extract. Some tubeless tires will require a lever at the final step. But, remembering to keep it centered will be most helpful. That is the slack you want. It is not by force. Finesse is all it takes. Like a ballet dancer, make it look easy.
View attachment 145549
Thanks, but couldn't pinch to center since the tire beads on both side stuck to the rims.
 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Petaluma, CA
stuck to the rims.
I had that last week with fat 3 inch tires. I used this. It is about 11 inches long. That problem is rare, but happens sometimes, mostly with balloon tires.
 

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smorgasbord

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
So now my worry is getting a flat while riding. I often ride in a preserve where cars aren't allowed so it could be 5 miles or so away from help.
 

m@Robertson

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
The technique of centering the tire bead in the depression in the middle of the rim is essential, always. This guy is pretty chatty but I used this video on the wheel assembly portion of my 'how to build an ebike' series because he does the impossible in real time, right in front of you, without tools. A word of warning though: Significant hand strength is a requirement.

That problem is rare, but happens sometimes, mostly with balloon tires.
Nowadays, with tubeless-centric rims, its the norm. The damn things are actually built specifically to do this. I have some wheels - in particular my Surly My Other Brother Darryl rims that came stock with my Big Fat Dummy - that are so bad I send them to my LBS to swap tires when the time comes. In fact on that bike that is the sole reason I decided to do a second wheelset, because I knew it would be impossible to do a roadside repair with them. My LBS concurred and said they were the most difficult wheels they'd ever worked with.

The DT Swiss FR 560 downhill rim is another one. I've had to give up on some tire combos with it. Tubed tires in particular on wheels like this have less flexible or even wire beads and they are just NOT happy at all with a rim designed specifically to effectively stretch a tire tight over them. Thankfully, my Apostate has these wheels and I have found two tires (Schwalbe Pickup tubed, and Maxxis Aggressor tubeless) that will fit on them. On my new Bullitt I was able to seat a Marathon Plus Tour on one.

Since my original post in this thread, I have found the tools that let you work on rims like the FR560 without losing fingernails, skin and dollars fed to the swear jar.

The unfortunately-named Bead Bro gives you the third hand you've always needed and is a minor miracle worker. And it is such a miracle that the manufacturer commands $30 for one of them. Its worth the money.


And since thats not bad enough, the same manufacturer sells the Bead Dropper lever, which is not indestructible, based on the Amazon reviews, but is ergonomically the best tire lever I have ever used. I can get a great grip on it, it delivers force the best and the damn thing just plain fits in that tight spot very well.


yes thats right another $20. If you are working with tires frequently thats when the money starts making more sense. I am three wheelsets into the Bead Bro and I knew it was worth the money after the first wheel.
 

fooferdoggie

Well-Known Member
T-


And since thats not bad enough, the same manufacturer sells the Bead Dropper lever, which is not indestructible, based on the Amazon reviews, but is ergonomically the best tire lever I have ever used. I can get a great grip on it, it delivers force the best and the damn thing just plain fits in that tight spot very well.

I could have used those on my older rims. it was so hard to get tires off and on. Plus it was too hard to hang onto levers when you needed so much force. but both sets of tires for my two bikes I can almost do it with no tools or only one tire lever.