Best value (not cheapest) city ebike for hills (with quality components, etc)...

cloudcover

New Member
Hello -

I've been spending way too much time researching ebikes and seem to be getting myself ever more confused. I was hoping the collective wisdom of this group could help shed some light and guide me to what might be some good options. I'll start with what I'm looking for -- and if it's helpful, at the end of the post is some info on the ebikes that I have and what's causing me to look for a new ebike.

I'm about 150lbs, live in Seattle, and am looking for a bike that's inviting to ride and one I can use to run errands (groceries, etc), ride to lunch meetings, etc. Here are things I care about (in rough order of importance):
  1. Hill Climbing. Ability to do well on fairly steep hills (some of the hills here will give San Francisco a run for its money). I don't expect the bike to handle steep hills without any pedaling effort on my part. In fact, I pretty much never use throttle-only and mostly want ebike assist so that it feels like I'm pedaling at most on a slight-ish incline. I'm assuming that a mid-drive motor would be best suited for this purpose.
  2. Good Components. I don't need top of line everything, but I'd definitely like to have hydraulic brakes, maybe an internal rear hub, maybe a Gates belt, etc.
  3. Aesthetics. I'd like to find a bike that's pretty "regular" and stealthy -- nothing showy or too ebike-y.
  4. Bike Rack Capable. This won't come up very often, but I'd love to be able to put it on a car bike rack/carrier (or public bus rack) for situations where that might be necessary.
  5. Inviting. I'd like to find a bike that's inviting and easy to use -- one where you can get on, ride, and get off easily. And that's maneuverable in a way that my cargo bike isn't.
My price range is anywhere from $1500 to $4000-ish. As the title says, I'm really more interested in bang for the buck (and a bike that I'll really love) rather than just spending as little as possible. If history is any indicator, if I like the bike enough, I'll forget about the price after a few months or years. :p

Here are a few bikes that I've considered (and some of which I'm still considering):
  • Priority Embark. This bike is the closest I've found to what I have in mind and I love most everything about this bike. My biggest concern is that the Bosch Active Line Plus motor may not be as powerful as I'd like for hills. If people think otherwise, then maybe my search is over. My other concern is that the 400 Watt-Hour battery pack maybe is a bit undersized. But as a practical matter, I don't know that I'll often (if ever) be riding more than 30-40 miles between charging.
  • Fuell Fluid. Looks like it has most everything that I need and I was quite close to pulling the trigger; but it seems a bit overdesigned for my tastes and I'm wondering if it would be less "inviting" than something like the Priority Embark. Maybe not?
  • Spark RX. This is listed in the Best Bikes section of this site and seems to be quite good in terms of bang for the buck.
  • Genze 200 Series. I really love a lot about this bike. I love how it looks, I love that it's public transit friendly, etc. But my concerns are that the 350W rear hub motor won't be sufficient for steep hills and the battery could be bigger.
  • Tern HSD. I actually like the design/idea of this a fair amount -- and the smaller tires make it seem more inviting and I'm guessing also would be an asset for hills. But it seems not to be a good value. Maybe not?
  • Rad Mini Step Through. I tried this out mostly because Rad is local. I was pleasantly surprised. It's a rear hub motor, but because it's 750W and geared and because the bike has 20" tires, it did just fine on the hills. I'm not sure how much I'd benefit from the folding capability because of it's weight, etc, but I liked how it rode. My concerns are mostly that it's components seem pretty basic. And probably due to culture, a conventional design (like the Priority Embark) rather than a mini step-through just seems a bit more appealing. Though maybe I shouldn't worry about that? It was surprisingly fun, has a well-sized battery, and is still quite inexpensive.
  • Carbo X Folding Bike. You'd think that this doesn't really match my needs all that well -- particularly because of its relatively low-powered 350W rear hub motor -- but there's something about it that's really appealing to me. I love the design, the components are great (hydraulic brakes, Gates belt, etc), and it's really light. But maybe I'm being seduced by an idea that in reality will just leave me disappointed?
I'd love to hear any comments on the bikes I listed, pointers to others that I haven't but that might be a good option, and then maybe also use this thread to kick off a general opinion conversation on best value (not cheapest) ebikes for city use.

Thanks everyone!
KR

- - - - -

My first ebike was one I had put together several years ago and which I still use quite a lot. It's a Surly Big Dummy cargo bike, to which I had installed a (nominal) 750W BMC V2-T geared rear hub motor (which can pretty easily run at 1200-ish watts). I have that paired with a 52V battery, a cadence PAS system, and the Cycle Analyst 3 from Grin. It's a great bike and has no problem with hills, etc. The main problem/issue that I have with it is that we no longer have little kids and so I don't really need a heavy duty cargo bike; and for short runs to the grocery store, to meet someone for lunch, etc, it's kinda big and unwieldy.

A few years ago (okay maybe more than a few), I bought a Kalkhoff Pro Connect S. I like most everything about it (size, weight, etc) BUT (a) it's pretty underpowered (a 2011-era mid-drive Panasonic motor with a wimpy 24V 10aH battery) and requires more effort on steep hills than I'd prefer, (b) the range isn't great (because of the wimpy battery), and (c) it looks pretty clunky compared to today's ebikes.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
If you are not completely discounting the DIY'er approach, why not update one of the bikes you have with the latest and greatest electronics of your choice?

My Rad City was 6 weeks old when I decided to update that because though I loved the bike, the only electronic/electrical part I liked was the battery. I installed a complete 1500w DD kit that was very inexpensive and really enjoy that result - until I get into the bigger hills. Now have a MAC 12t motor and wheel sitting on the bench waiting for me to swap that in - for the bike's second update! I've gone that route as I ride purely for pleasure and have no need for speeds over 20mph. Even with this second update, I'm still riding a relatively inexpensive bike!
 

Foody

New Member
I would highly recommend a used Stromer ST1 or ST2 for those SF Hills. There are some locally in the bay area on craigslist for around $2000. These are swiss made bikes and I have both bikes. They are a dream to ride and very powerful rear hub motor at 500w. They are like the BMW of ebikes without all the maintenance issues of a BMW car. 4DA05201-341A-4818-901D-061F6C153554.jpeg
 

ChezCheese:)

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Kitsap Co, WA
The BH Atom Diamond Pro I just got is wonderful on hills, and I live across the water from you outside of Poulsbo. It has a quiet, smooth mid-motor by Brose. I got it specifically for the 90nm torque because I live on a big hill. My road gives me a choice of a very steep but shorter climb, or a less steep but seemingly endless climb on the other side. It is very well-made, and comes with rack, lights and chain glider. 600 wt hr battery. 5 year warranty. Bright color display on the controller. Doesn't have big fat (dragging) tires. Suspension fork. It has an internally geared rear hub, but BH also makes the Atom City Wave Pro which is the same bike in all respects except it has a derailleur, if you prefer it. Both are class 1, so no throttle, but with the torque it has, who needs it? All for $2,899. You can check it out at Seattle eBike in Pioneer Square. They have 4 more in stock right now.

If you want a throttle, a Giant Quick e is a good bike, too. Has the Yamaha motor. But I have tried about 8 or 9 different bikes and the BH Atom Diamond Wave felt best to me. You are fortunate to live in Seattle where you can try out almost any major ebike brand. Go with what feels best to you.
 

AlanDB

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Iowa
Take a look at the Evelo Aurora Limited Edition Mid-Drive. It is at the upper end of your price range but looks like it would meet most of your requirements. I own a different Evelo product and have been impressed with the quality and with the company in general.
 
I like the Tern brand in generally, and though I haven't seen the HSD yet except online, I would expect it to deliver for you. The smaller wheels will climb better, all other things being equal.

I do like the active line plus motor, if you can find a bike you like with it I wouldn't hesitate on that front. Especially if it has an internally-geared rear hub, where the performance line cruise motor offers exactly the same peak torque performance. The Tern Vektron S10 with the active line plus motor is another great option to consider.
 

ilanarama

Member
Hi, I have owned a Priority Embark for a little over a month now, and love it! Here is my blog post about my experiences so far, and that links to my process of searching for a bike and how I chose this one.

I live on a mesa with a ~350' climb in a mile and a half (with two very steep sections) and I have had no problem with the Embark carrying me and a full load of groceries up the hill. (See my photos in the relevant thread or at my blog!) I have been trying to be conscientious about charging only to ~80-90% for battery longevity, and I have made it 48 and 45 miles on a charge (those are my only two actual keep-track measurements). I mostly ride in eco and tour except going up The Hill, in which case I use sport mode on the less steep parts and turbo on the steepest (or, let's be real, sometimes I just turbo it all the way).

The one issue you should be aware of is that Priority is sold out until December, though they have some lightly-used demos for sale at a big discount.
 

swaldman

New Member
Having just faced the same situation in Seattle, I can heartily recommend the Bulls Evo Cross Lite that I just bought! (although I guess I haven't had it long enough to find out any problems)

It pretty much has a mountain bike's drivechain on a commuter frame (Bosch CX motor and a really wide gear range), which makes it ideal for Seattle hill climbing. As stealthy as it gets (the battery is inside an enlarged bottom tube) and being below 55lbs it's allowed on the bus bike racks. (though lifting it on there might not be so easy - haven't tried yet!).

Normally about $4300, but Seattle Electric Bike have it on sale for $3900 this month. Which is in your price range, unless your price range included sales tax ;-) It *is* relatively pricey, and if you're only 150lbs it might be overkill...

I started off wanting hub gears, but changed my mind when I discovered that the motors mostly have their torque capped when used with them - so they really hurt hill climbing.

If you liked the Rad Mini, have you tried the RadCity? I didn't get on with the hub drive and lack of torque sensor - it didn't feel natural - but if the feel works for you then it's a lot cheaper and, as you say, local.
 

John from Connecticut

Well-Known Member
Hello -

I've been spending way too much time researching ebikes and seem to be getting myself ever more confused. I was hoping the collective wisdom of this group could help shed some light and guide me to what might be some good options. I'll start with what I'm looking for -- and if it's helpful, at the end of the post is some info on the ebikes that I have and what's causing me to look for a new ebike.

I'm about 150lbs, live in Seattle, and am looking for a bike that's inviting to ride and one I can use to run errands (groceries, etc), ride to lunch meetings, etc. Here are things I care about (in rough order of importance):
  1. Hill Climbing. Ability to do well on fairly steep hills (some of the hills here will give San Francisco a run for its money). I don't expect the bike to handle steep hills without any pedaling effort on my part. In fact, I pretty much never use throttle-only and mostly want ebike assist so that it feels like I'm pedaling at most on a slight-ish incline. I'm assuming that a mid-drive motor would be best suited for this purpose.
  2. Good Components. I don't need top of line everything, but I'd definitely like to have hydraulic brakes, maybe an internal rear hub, maybe a Gates belt, etc.
  3. Aesthetics. I'd like to find a bike that's pretty "regular" and stealthy -- nothing showy or too ebike-y.
  4. Bike Rack Capable. This won't come up very often, but I'd love to be able to put it on a car bike rack/carrier (or public bus rack) for situations where that might be necessary.
  5. Inviting. I'd like to find a bike that's inviting and easy to use -- one where you can get on, ride, and get off easily. And that's maneuverable in a way that my cargo bike isn't.
My price range is anywhere from $1500 to $4000-ish. As the title says, I'm really more interested in bang for the buck (and a bike that I'll really love) rather than just spending as little as possible. If history is any indicator, if I like the bike enough, I'll forget about the price after a few months or years. :p

Here are a few bikes that I've considered (and some of which I'm still considering):
  • Priority Embark. This bike is the closest I've found to what I have in mind and I love most everything about this bike. My biggest concern is that the Bosch Active Line Plus motor may not be as powerful as I'd like for hills. If people think otherwise, then maybe my search is over. My other concern is that the 400 Watt-Hour battery pack maybe is a bit undersized. But as a practical matter, I don't know that I'll often (if ever) be riding more than 30-40 miles between charging.
  • Fuell Fluid. Looks like it has most everything that I need and I was quite close to pulling the trigger; but it seems a bit overdesigned for my tastes and I'm wondering if it would be less "inviting" than something like the Priority Embark. Maybe not?
  • Spark RX. This is listed in the Best Bikes section of this site and seems to be quite good in terms of bang for the buck.
  • Genze 200 Series. I really love a lot about this bike. I love how it looks, I love that it's public transit friendly, etc. But my concerns are that the 350W rear hub motor won't be sufficient for steep hills and the battery could be bigger.
  • Tern HSD. I actually like the design/idea of this a fair amount -- and the smaller tires make it seem more inviting and I'm guessing also would be an asset for hills. But it seems not to be a good value. Maybe not?
  • Rad Mini Step Through. I tried this out mostly because Rad is local. I was pleasantly surprised. It's a rear hub motor, but because it's 750W and geared and because the bike has 20" tires, it did just fine on the hills. I'm not sure how much I'd benefit from the folding capability because of it's weight, etc, but I liked how it rode. My concerns are mostly that it's components seem pretty basic. And probably due to culture, a conventional design (like the Priority Embark) rather than a mini step-through just seems a bit more appealing. Though maybe I shouldn't worry about that? It was surprisingly fun, has a well-sized battery, and is still quite inexpensive.
  • Carbo X Folding Bike. You'd think that this doesn't really match my needs all that well -- particularly because of its relatively low-powered 350W rear hub motor -- but there's something about it that's really appealing to me. I love the design, the components are great (hydraulic brakes, Gates belt, etc), and it's really light. But maybe I'm being seduced by an idea that in reality will just leave me disappointed?
I'd love to hear any comments on the bikes I listed, pointers to others that I haven't but that might be a good option, and then maybe also use this thread to kick off a general opinion conversation on best value (not cheapest) ebikes for city use.

Thanks everyone!
KR

- - - - -

My first ebike was one I had put together several years ago and which I still use quite a lot. It's a Surly Big Dummy cargo bike, to which I had installed a (nominal) 750W BMC V2-T geared rear hub motor (which can pretty easily run at 1200-ish watts). I have that paired with a 52V battery, a cadence PAS system, and the Cycle Analyst 3 from Grin. It's a great bike and has no problem with hills, etc. The main problem/issue that I have with it is that we no longer have little kids and so I don't really need a heavy duty cargo bike; and for short runs to the grocery store, to meet someone for lunch, etc, it's kinda big and unwieldy.

A few years ago (okay maybe more than a few), I bought a Kalkhoff Pro Connect S. I like most everything about it (size, weight, etc) BUT (a) it's pretty underpowered (a 2011-era mid-drive Panasonic motor with a wimpy 24V 10aH battery) and requires more effort on steep hills than I'd prefer, (b) the range isn't great (because of the wimpy battery), and (c) it looks pretty clunky compared to today's ebikes.


Hello,
Everyone has their own style when it comes to choosing an e-Bike. Even though how I made my decision was completely opposite yours, I totally
agree with where you are in your selection and the 5 things you care about. I think all five are spot on. I also think your approach to obtaining bang
for your buck ( and a bike that you'll really love) vs spending as little as possible is also spot on and very wise. This is exactly how I feel
about my two bikes.

I've had them for two years, ridden nearly 5000 miles and every day is like the first day. You'll have the same
feeling. As for what bike to choose, There are as many really good bikes as there are Posters on this forum.

My bikes have Bosch Power Trains, Performance Line and Performance CX. You are correct, the Bosch Active Line motor with 40 nm of torque
would not be a consideration if I lived in San Fran. The Active Line was designed for crusin'

The Performance Line motor, with 65nm is designed for speed, Class 3 28mph, plenty of power but geared to commute. My all around fav is
the Bosch Performance CX ,Class 2 20mph with 75nm of torque. It will climb a brick wall : ) I'm running mine with the Speedbox Dongle
making it a Class 3, but I rarely ride above 22-23 mph.

I hope this helps, perhaps some of your bike choices may have Bosch Components. Speaking of choices. When I made my choice I visited my LBS
two years ago I didn't know an e-Bike from a pound of cheese. I had a Trek Hybrid non e-bike. I'd been looking at the e-Bikes each time I visited.
My sales rep said "Stop looking at them and take one out a ride" : ) So I did, in ten minutes I knew the e-Bike was for me. I loved it,
I rode for 20 minutes total, went back to the shop and bought it. I couldn't be happier.

I have a Trek XM700+ and a Trek Powerfly7 ...Your words describe exactly how I feel about my bikes.... "I'm really more interested in bang for the buck
(and a bike that I'll really love) rather than just spending as little as possible. If history is any indicator, if I like the bike enough, I'll forget about the price
after a few months or years
 

elainehillrider

New Member
Hello -

I've been spending way too much time researching ebikes and seem to be getting myself ever more confused. I was hoping the collective wisdom of this group could help shed some light and guide me to what might be some good options. I'll start with what I'm looking for -- and if it's helpful, at the end of the post is some info on the ebikes that I have and what's causing me to look for a new ebike.

I'm about 150lbs, live in Seattle, and am looking for a bike that's inviting to ride and one I can use to run errands (groceries, etc), ride to lunch meetings, etc. Here are things I care about (in rough order of importance):
  1. Hill Climbing. Ability to do well on fairly steep hills (some of the hills here will give San Francisco a run for its money). I don't expect the bike to handle steep hills without any pedaling effort on my part. In fact, I pretty much never use throttle-only and mostly want ebike assist so that it feels like I'm pedaling at most on a slight-ish incline. I'm assuming that a mid-drive motor would be best suited for this purpose.
  2. Good Components. I don't need top of line everything, but I'd definitely like to have hydraulic brakes, maybe an internal rear hub, maybe a Gates belt, etc.
  3. Aesthetics. I'd like to find a bike that's pretty "regular" and stealthy -- nothing showy or too ebike-y.
  4. Bike Rack Capable. This won't come up very often, but I'd love to be able to put it on a car bike rack/carrier (or public bus rack) for situations where that might be necessary.
  5. Inviting. I'd like to find a bike that's inviting and easy to use -- one where you can get on, ride, and get off easily. And that's maneuverable in a way that my cargo bike isn't.
My price range is anywhere from $1500 to $4000-ish. As the title says, I'm really more interested in bang for the buck (and a bike that I'll really love) rather than just spending as little as possible. If history is any indicator, if I like the bike enough, I'll forget about the price after a few months or years. :p

Here are a few bikes that I've considered (and some of which I'm still considering):
  • Priority Embark. This bike is the closest I've found to what I have in mind and I love most everything about this bike. My biggest concern is that the Bosch Active Line Plus motor may not be as powerful as I'd like for hills. If people think otherwise, then maybe my search is over. My other concern is that the 400 Watt-Hour battery pack maybe is a bit undersized. But as a practical matter, I don't know that I'll often (if ever) be riding more than 30-40 miles between charging.
  • Fuell Fluid. Looks like it has most everything that I need and I was quite close to pulling the trigger; but it seems a bit overdesigned for my tastes and I'm wondering if it would be less "inviting" than something like the Priority Embark. Maybe not?
  • Spark RX. This is listed in the Best Bikes section of this site and seems to be quite good in terms of bang for the buck.
  • Genze 200 Series. I really love a lot about this bike. I love how it looks, I love that it's public transit friendly, etc. But my concerns are that the 350W rear hub motor won't be sufficient for steep hills and the battery could be bigger.
  • Tern HSD. I actually like the design/idea of this a fair amount -- and the smaller tires make it seem more inviting and I'm guessing also would be an asset for hills. But it seems not to be a good value. Maybe not?
  • Rad Mini Step Through. I tried this out mostly because Rad is local. I was pleasantly surprised. It's a rear hub motor, but because it's 750W and geared and because the bike has 20" tires, it did just fine on the hills. I'm not sure how much I'd benefit from the folding capability because of it's weight, etc, but I liked how it rode. My concerns are mostly that it's components seem pretty basic. And probably due to culture, a conventional design (like the Priority Embark) rather than a mini step-through just seems a bit more appealing. Though maybe I shouldn't worry about that? It was surprisingly fun, has a well-sized battery, and is still quite inexpensive.
  • Carbo X Folding Bike. You'd think that this doesn't really match my needs all that well -- particularly because of its relatively low-powered 350W rear hub motor -- but there's something about it that's really appealing to me. I love the design, the components are great (hydraulic brakes, Gates belt, etc), and it's really light. But maybe I'm being seduced by an idea that in reality will just leave me disappointed?
I'd love to hear any comments on the bikes I listed, pointers to others that I haven't but that might be a good option, and then maybe also use this thread to kick off a general opinion conversation on best value (not cheapest) ebikes for city use.

Thanks everyone!
KR

- - - - -

My first ebike was one I had put together several years ago and which I still use quite a lot. It's a Surly Big Dummy cargo bike, to which I had installed a (nominal) 750W BMC V2-T geared rear hub motor (which can pretty easily run at 1200-ish watts). I have that paired with a 52V battery, a cadence PAS system, and the Cycle Analyst 3 from Grin. It's a great bike and has no problem with hills, etc. The main problem/issue that I have with it is that we no longer have little kids and so I don't really need a heavy duty cargo bike; and for short runs to the grocery store, to meet someone for lunch, etc, it's kinda big and unwieldy.

A few years ago (okay maybe more than a few), I bought a Kalkhoff Pro Connect S. I like most everything about it (size, weight, etc) BUT (a) it's pretty underpowered (a 2011-era mid-drive Panasonic motor with a wimpy 24V 10aH battery) and requires more effort on steep hills than I'd prefer, (b) the range isn't great (because of the wimpy battery), and (c) it looks pretty clunky compared to today's ebikes.
I think Ariel Rider C-Class will meet your requirements. They don't have top of the line products such as Magura brakes. But it's price is only 1799 $.

It has a mid-drive motor so can climb hills.
Comes with a suspension fork and seat post. But I doubt it is good for offroad. Seems like very entry level fork.
8 Speed Nexus Internal Hub. (It isn't a nuvinci or alfine but I am ok with nexus as long as it is 7 or 8 speed. ) .
It has integrated rear rack and front basket so easy to carry lot of products.
And has easy adjustable stem.

Tern HSD is a good e-bike too but always be careful for small wheel e-bikes. They have good acceleration but without suspension your ride can be little rough. You will feel every tiny bumps on road.
 

McCorby

Well-Known Member
Hi, I’m new here, but have been looking at and researching ebikes since the beginning of the year. I ended up getting a Felt Sport- E 50 in May. It weighs only 42lbs and has nice components including Shimano 180mm hydraulic disc brakes, 9 speed Deore XT derailleur, and best of all, the Steps E8000 mid drive motor. I’m not sure why Felt chose to use Shimano’s top of the line MTB motor on a commuter bike, but I’m glad they did! It is so smooth and well tuned. It eats up hills for fun! The bike feels and rides like an analog bike. Very light and agile, which is what I was looking for in an ebike. I test rode several others before choosing the Felt. It doesn’t get a lot of press, but I can’t recommend it enough! Definitely worth checking out.
 
The Felt looks very good. Did you outfit it with fenders, lights, rear rack, and a chain guard? Is the digital display easy to use? Is the stock seat comfortable? California looks like the source in the States for e-bikes.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Living in Seattle their is a treasure trove of good electric bike shops. I highly recommend you take as much time as you need to go around and test ride various bikes. In so doing, I am sure you will find both the bike you want and the people you want to help keep you riding.

The two shops I really recommend you go spend some time in both have really good people and a great range of bike choices. They are G&O Family Cyclery on Greenwood at 85th and Seattle Folding and Electric Bike on Leary in Ballard. There is another shop in the north end with some good ebikes but I found the manager/owner not to be an honest person.

My own selection process began with sorting through the various electric parts suppliers, motors, controllers, batteries. I asked around at various shops and read up on the topic. I settled on Bosch as the one with the fewest service issues according to repair shops. Also they have top notch tech support, product training and parts pipeline. Then it was a matter of test riding various bikes.

I ended up with Riese & Muller bikes...expensive but very well put together with top grade components all around. Given that I now ride my bike everywhere, seldom driving my car and put an average of over 500 miles a month on my bikes, getting really solid, well built ones was the right decision....no regrets. I am eager to ride every day.
 

maria.owenby

New Member
I think Ariel Rider C-Class will meet your requirements. They don't have top of the line products such as Magura brakes. But it's price is only 1799 $.

It has a mid-drive motor so can climb hills.
Comes with a suspension fork and seat post. But I doubt it is good for offroad. Seems like very entry level fork.
8 Speed Nexus Internal Hub. (It isn't a nuvinci or alfine but I am ok with nexus as long as it is 7 or 8 speed. ) .
It has integrated rear rack and front basket so easy to carry lot of products.
And has easy adjustable stem.

Tern HSD is a good e-bike too but always be careful for small wheel e-bikes. They have good acceleration but without suspension your ride can be little rough. You will feel every tiny bumps on road.
For that price Ariel Rider seems a very good option. I personally love Tern too. So if I have some extra cash I would buy Tern but if 2K is my upper limit then Ariel seems a much better option. At least in terms of value.
 

McCorby

Well-Known Member
The Felt looks very good. Did you outfit it with fenders, lights, rear rack, and a chain guard? Is the digital display easy to use? Is the stock seat comfortable? California looks like the source in the States for e-bikes.
I installed a Topeak Explorer Disk rear rack with a Topeak detachable MTX trunk bag with foldout panniers. The bike comes pre-wired for front and rear lights. I just received a Lezyne E-Bike Micro Drive 500 light for the front. Hope to install it this week. I actuallly find the stock seat pretty comfortable and don't plan to replace it. I did install a Kinect 2.1 isolation seat post. It works really well eliminating those pesky bumps.
The bike has Shimano's larger display with remote controls. I like it a lot. Very easy to read with lots of information including cadence and a range display for all 3 assist modes. I really like having battery voltage percentage versus just bars with only 20% resolution. The power output bar is nice for seeing how much the motor is actually assisting.
For $2,600, I think the bike is a really good value.
 

McCorby

Well-Known Member
Another plus for the Felt is that it comes in 5 frame sizes! I test rode the 48cm and it felt good, but I was concerned it was a little too small. They also had a 55cm that I tried, but it was definitely too big. The salesman said they had a 52cm still in the box and that I could take the 48cm home for the weekend and bring it back on Monday if I was still concerned it was too small, and they'd have the 52 ready to go for me. That's exactly what I ended up doing. I test rode the 52cm on Monday and it was a perfect fit. It was really nice that they let me take the 48 home knowing that there was a good chance I would be back to exchange it. Awesome customer service!
Also, I think it's really important to demo as many bikes as you can before making your choice. I went to 4 local shops and tried several different bikes before making my decision. Doing so, I'm confident that I picked the right bike for me.
 

McCorby

Well-Known Member
The Kinect seat post looks awesome. How are you liking it? I like the looks of that light as well.
The kinect post works great. A noticeable improvement in riding comfort. It's a little expensive, but I feel it's worth it. The light appears to be nicely built and I like how it mounts to the handle bar mounting bracket. I'll post what I think of it after I install it.