BICYCLE BOOM 2020

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Deleted member 4210

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Covid 19 Pandemic Fuels Bike Boom.

BikeBoom.jpeg
As social distancing is the order of the day, riding a packed subway to get around is not exactly what the doctor prescribed. Add to that the need for people to stay active as gyms and sports centers across the nation are closed and, as Statista's Felix Richter notes, you‘ve got the perfect recipe for a bicycle boom, which is exactly what the industry has been seeing for the past two months.

Survey data from U.S. bike manufacturer Trek gives us an idea why cycling is so popular these days. 85 percent of Americans consider it safer than public transportation during the coronavirus outbreak, while 63 percent of respondents feel that it helps to relieve stress/anxiety associated with the pandemic.

At least there is a silver lining to these lockdowns for bike shops.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
Here is another study... definitely a silver lining to the current situation.


 

pmcdonald

Well-Known Member
What has your experience been as a retailer during this period Mike? I'm really curious to hear what it's like trading at the coalface during this so called boom whilst under restrictions.
 

Alex M

Well-Known Member
Maybe a boon for bike shops, not sure about everybody else.

This is an abnormal and (hopefully) temporary situation. Most of those who were taking public transit before, will revert back to transit after the epidemic has been over. Or will get a car.

Kids bikes sales are up because schools are closed (and childcare centers, even if some are open, should better be avoided now). Parents are cooped up with children all day long, tired of home schooling. This affects children as well - cycling or no cycling, they are left without habitual school environment, no contact with their friends.

My schedule is flexible, I used to ride for pleasure on weekdays. Now 2 parks with bike trails close to me are crowded every single day. Moms with strollers, families with and without children, with or without bikes. Dog people are out all day long, having nothing else to do. On a parkling at the trail entrance used to be a few cars, you could choose - this or that corner, or in the shade, now it's a problem to find a parking spot. Joggers are running like crazy up and down the streets, gyms are closed.
It can be stressful when everybody is out to relieve their stress.
 
Standing in line Tuesday to order my Cafe Moto ebike, overheard salesperson explaining “only 3 mountain bikes in stock, no more expected until July, unless Trek and that may be November.”

Cafe Moto, ignored by ”real cyclists,” and inefficiently marketed to the “please give me an easy-to-ride crowd” like me—well, you can have one of those at a discount in 5-7 days.
 
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Deleted member 4210

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What has your experience been as a retailer during this period Mike? I'm really curious to hear what it's like trading at the coalface during this so called boom whilst under restrictions.
Just saw this. You asking me ? It was off the charts crazy high demand. It finally started tapering off here in October. My October was still double last year, and most months were at least treble. I'm ready for the usual winter slow down, so I can catch my breathe. Grateful, but exhausted. Too many 16 to 18 hour days can burn you out.
 
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Deleted member 4210

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The best silver lining is more people biking, more exercising, and fewer car trips overall. Now if we can build that up as a country and keep the bike riding momentum going post the initial Covid lockdowns and societal shock of it all, it would not be such a bad thing. Besides that, people biking seem very friendly to each other for the most part. Lots of smiles, friendly nods, and hellos.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
To keep the bike boom going
Beware of the previous boom and bust cycles as our Cycling history from the '70s may be repeated... ;)

Millions of Americans have been swept up in the adult cycling craze that has emptied bicycle dealers’ showrooms across the nation and swamped manufacturers with a backlog of orders,” a newspaper story reported. In it, one New York City bike dealer says, “Three years ago 80 percent of the bikes were for children. Now it’s just the opposite.”

It sounds like one of the many recent descriptions of biking during the Covid pandemic, as thousands of lockdown-weary Americans have snapped up new two-wheelers. Bike sales in March were more than double a year earlier, and cycling shops report long waits and inventory shortages. But those lines come from a 1971 article in the Austin American-Statesman. At the time, the U.S. was in the midst of a massive cycling surge as young Baby Boomers embraced environmentalism. “Bicycles are back—and booming!” declared a 1972 feature story in National Geographic.

Within a few years, however, that boom had popped, relegating bicycles once again to a fringe mode of adult transportation
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And that was just one of several boom-and-bust waves of cycling enthusiasm that have marked this mode’s American journey.
 
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mogulskier

Active Member
If you do a deeper dive into the numbers, you are also seeing nicely spec'ed emtb's growing a lot more than I would have imagined. They'll be stronger drive to open up more trail access points.
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
I think much of this is Boomers like myself retiring and having more time/need for exercise, along with advancements in ebike quality/capability. I spent the last 2-3 years waiting for these advancements and maturation of service/technology in the form of Trek/Specialized shops in my area. That said, COVID has definitely had a major influence.