Big Guy 6.3, 360 lb, 60 yr. In need of true advice

zipur

Active Member
Region
USA
First, let me make the obvious joke away …Best advice, "Lose weight" Ok, most posters are longtime riders or in-shape people. I’m not that guy, as you can see from the title. I’ve been too lazy, and now I want to get active. I have two grandchildren who moved in with us. Both are Junior Olympic participants. I want to take them riding for fun because they work out too much. By that, I mean after school. They spend their off time running, training, stretching, or lifting.
I thought riding would be an excellent alternative. But I have issues with hills, pain, and all the other things which would discourage me.
I had a great summer two years ago riding with the wife. It was some of the best times we’ve had in years, a really special experience. However, I developed a strange knee pain that came out of nowhere, caused me to stop riding my Trek FX. So I was thinking, just a little “Help” from an EBike would be the answer! Save my knees until I lose some weight. Plus, give me back those Special Times with the breeze in our face, birds, trees, creeks, and smiles.
I am a Trek Fanboy with four stores 20 min. In any compass direction. I've settled in on an Alliant 7s. I been to three stores looking, sitting, and lusting over a 7s. The. Stores are pretty busy, and I didn’t ask questions. Can you help?
— is the 7s the answer for my knee strain?
— Am I just too heavy for a 7s since its rated at 300 lbs.?
— Thorn and Flat prevention, should we use slim or an insert like the Tannus Armour Tire Insert? https://www.worldwidecyclery.com/pr...YkyNZ9-hAz5w7k4lG92IeqJq5Ph2Sn3BoCfaYQAvD_BwE
— With a bike this expensive do I really need to replace the seat?
— should I consider a different option?

We will be riding in the Dallas area, state parks and lakes, paved trails, with some dirt trails, not mountain expeditions. Riding as much as I can during the summer, once school kicks back in we’ll slow down. Any comments or suggestions would be appreciated.

Update: I found this great Long Post on Redit for anyone who has questions like I did/do.
advice for fat riders from a former 300lb cyclist

Update to the Update: One has to have goals in riding, so here it is:

 
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Timpo

Well-Known Member
As far as I know, Trek does not come with throttle, are you sure you want that bike?
If you have a knee pain, throttle might be a nice thing to have when you need it.

The weight rating should be fine, I remember @AHicks (and numbers of other EBR members) saying RadRover could handle more than the weight rating.
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
First let me take the obvious joke away …best advice, lose weight. Ok, most posters are longtime riders or in shape people. I’m not that guy as you can see from the title. Il’ve been too lazy and now I want to get active. I have two grandchildren who moved in with us. Both are Junior Olympic partcipatants. I want to take them riding for fun because they work out too much. By that I mean after school they spend their off time running, training, stretching or lifting.
I thought riding would be awesome alternative. But i’ll have issues, cramps, hills, pain and all the other things which would discourage me.
I had a great summer two years ago riding with the wife. It was some of the best times we’ve had in years, really special experience. However I developed a strange knee pain which came out of nowhere, caused me to stop riding my Trek FX. So I was thinking, just a little “help” with an EBike would be the answer! Save my knees until I lose some weight. Plus give me back those Special Times with the breeze in our face, birds, trees, creeks and smiles.
I’m now a Trek Fanboy with four stores 20 min. in any compass direction. I've settled in on an Alliant 7s. Been to three stores looking, sitting and lusting over a 7s. The. Stores are pretty busy and I didn’t ask questions. Can you help?
— is the 7s the answer for my knee strain?
— Am I just too heavy for a 7s since its rated at 300 lbs.?
— Thorn and Flat prevention, should we use slim or an insert like the Tannus Armour Tire Insert? https://www.worldwidecyclery.com/pr...YkyNZ9-hAz5w7k4lG92IeqJq5Ph2Sn3BoCfaYQAvD_BwE
— With a bike this expensive do I really need to replace the seat?
— should I consider a different option?

We will be riding in the Dallas area, state parks and lakes, paved trails, with some dirt trails, not mountain expeditions. Riding as much as I can during the summer, once school kicks back in we’ll slow down. Any comments or suggestions would be appreciated.
As a 65+ rider who spent years riding then got away from it, I say go for it! Times awastin’, as they say.
I own an Allant+7 w/4th Gen Bosch Perf. line CX motor. Not sure about the weight issue from a frame issue but I’d count on the Trek folks to answer that. The other issue to consider is a normal diamond frame vs a step-through frame. Given your knee concerns and your desire to actually pedal to get in shape, I strongly suggest that you test ride the +7 and +7s up an average hill you might encounter with the kids. The +7s is going to go faster but the +7 should give a bit better climbing capability considering your weight. IMO, the test should also focus on the seat and riding position. You can easily get a different seat and bar ends to help adjust seating position, as I did. Proper fit will affect how your knee feels so to me that’s critical.
I love my Allant+7 with over 1400 miles in a year and it’s not unusual for me to do a 27 mile ride three times a week. BTW, I just recently added Tannus Armor after having 3 rear flats in a year! Best of luck in your search.
4A91CCB3-64B2-4E86-BEAB-CCBD9AE59EB8.jpeg
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
I'm 70 years young, 6'2" and 315, and could give a damn about my weight. Blood work comes back without issues and everything is working......OK. I ride because I like to - regularly. On average 6-7 times a week (I'll pass if the weather isn't behaving). Nothing crazy, just 3-5 miles as a rule, or maybe a little more on occasion. Never more than 20 miles. My butt just won't let me go any further.

That in mind, I can answer one question easily. Your butt will tell you if it likes the seat in pretty short order. I've had several bikes, and finding a seat that works is just part of the plan.

And I'm firmly in the "must have throttle" camp. It's a huge help in getting the bike moving, in ALL conditions, for those first few feet while you collect your balance. The other scenario where it's nice, is if you manage to hurt yourself on a ride. I had a dumb a** moment a while back where the bike wheelied right out from under me, leaving me lying flat on my back. I was OK, but it knocked the wind out of me for sure. It was NICE to be able to ride the bike home - out of the woods I had been riding in - without having to pedal.

Noteworthy maybe, is that both of the bikes I ride currently are rated for 275lbs. One of these I've been riding for 4 years already, without a single issue that might even be close to weight related. I don't know what they use for capacity criteria, I've never seen it, but I think it safe to say it's pretty conservative. -Al
 

zipur

Active Member
Region
USA
Dallant: I've been following your post. You're the reason I locked into the Trek 7s.

AHicks: I want to be like you riding six days a week, You commented that "must have throttle camp" . What bike are you riding? You make an interesting point on the need for a throttle. But my main goal is to get in shape, I could buy a scooter for about the same price. I need exercise and movement, so I've nixed the throttle bikes. However I would be interesting in more of your comments.
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Dallant: I've been following your post. You're the reason I locked into the Trek 7s.

AHicks: I want to be like you riding six days a week, You commented that "must have throttle camp" . What bike are you riding? You make an interesting point on the need for a throttle. But my main goal is to get in shape, I could buy a scooter for about the same price. I need exercise and movement, so I've nixed the throttle bikes. However I would be interesting in more of your comments.
I don’t have a +7s. The +7s has the Perf. Line Speed vs the CX. From what little I actually know, the CX would be the more stout of the two motors.
Honestly…I’d be concerned about your weight with any aluminum-framed ebike. Steel would probably be a better option for you. I’d also be concerned about the wear on the motor/wheels/etc. and what your warranty might/might not cover. Again, best of luck.
 

kmccune

Active Member
This is a crazy question-are you overweight or just big?.My bike recommendation is going to be a little different, get a step through cruiser, Maxfoot has one( think they are in stock) it has a 750 watt motor and a 13 ah battery , the price is reasonable as these things go and the bike is big, just a thought. I am not trying to be Dr.Oz or any of those showmen, You get out more and eat less bread you are going to see an improvement, for Petes sake, get those kids something else to do.Bike riding is a pleasure they shouldn't be denied,I traded a weight set for a bicycle one time( one of the best moves I ever made)
Hope for the best for you,Kevin
 

kmccune

Active Member
I'm 70 years young, 6'2" and 315, and could give a damn about my weight. Blood work comes back without issues and everything is working......OK. I ride because I like to - regularly. On average 6-7 times a week (I'll pass if the weather isn't behaving). Nothing crazy, just 3-5 miles as a rule, or maybe a little more on occasion. Never more than 20 miles. My butt just won't let me go any further.

That in mind, I can answer one question easily. Your butt will tell you if it likes the seat in pretty short order. I've had several bikes, and finding a seat that works is just part of the plan.

And I'm firmly in the "must have throttle" camp. It's a huge help in getting the bike moving, in ALL conditions, for those first few feet while you collect your balance. The other scenario where it's nice, is if you manage to hurt yourself on a ride. I had a dumb a** moment a while back where the bike wheelied right out from under me, leaving me lying flat on my back. I was OK, but it knocked the wind out of me for sure. It was NICE to be able to ride the bike home - out of the woods I had been riding in - without having to pedal.

Noteworthy maybe, is that both of the bikes I ride currently are rated for 275lbs. One of these I've been riding for 4 years already, without a single issue that might even be close to weight related. I don't know what they use for capacity criteria, I've never seen it, but I think it safe to say it's pretty conservative. -Al
Make it real AHicks! ( you did-thank you)
 

zipur

Active Member
Region
USA
This is a crazy question-are you overweight or just big?.My bike recommendation is going to be a little different, get a step through cruiser, Maxfoot has one( think they are in stock) it has a 750 watt motor and a 13 ah battery , the price is reasonable as these things go and the bike is big, just a thought. I am not trying to be Dr.Oz or any of those showmen, You get out more and eat less bread you are going to see an improvement, for Petes sake, get those kids something else to do.Bike riding is a pleasure they shouldn't be denied,I traded a weight set for a bicycle one time( one of the best moves I ever made)
Hope for the best for you,Kevin

Yes I am overweight. Twenty years of 24/7 rotating shift desk work is the untold story of the down side of an Info. Tech. career.
Agreed, my grands are in outstanding shape, honor roll in school and sports keeps them focused and away for the pitfalls of youth.
That is my mandate to take them out, camping, fishing and discovering. Don't get me wrong, my grands live right, eat healthy, honest and love the Lord.
The trouble is nowadays other people's kids live in their phones and the game Call of Duty. The only out doors playing kids do these days are in organized sports. With that, some excell in whatever sport they play. My grands excel in track.

I'll look into the Maxfoot products. Thanks for your recommendation.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
When I say "must have throttle camp" it doesn't mean it's in use constantly. Actually, after getting the bike moving, it's rarely used again on that ride. Because you have the ability, doesn't mean you need to use it constantly. Use it only when/if you feel like it! Think of the throttle as just a tool that's there for you to use.

The fact many are riding, that could/would not ride without it, speaks for itself.

I have a RAD and a Rize bike. Both kinda hot rods, as that suits my personality, and I spend a lot of time riding some pretty hilly terrain. Sometimes need that big power to get my butt to the top of a big hill. That's something both of my bikes can do easily. I'm not happy getting to the top of a hill on foot, or when the bike and I are both left panting at the top. Call me spoiled....
 

Law

Active Member
Zipur

IMO You’re going to break the frame or the tubes or the tire on a Hardtail Trek bike like that Going over anything.

Plus it’s not a really good bike with no rear suspension very limited front suspension and it’s still five grand With 500 wh Shitty battery

Your instincts are good on the throttle as you will likely break any drivetrain with your weight at 400 pounds with the bike.

Get a full suspension commuter bike. Good luck man.
 

retiredNH

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Geesh, some real Trek haters here. Throttle? What's wrong with starting by pedal? Folks have done that for, what, 120 years or so?

Regarding weight limits, talk to your Trek dealer. They know far, far more than anonymous posters here that push their own agenda. These bike frames are pretty conservatively designed.

And for you non bosch folks, it seems the difference between the top level Bosch motors, CX or Speed, is in the speed limit. According to Bosch specs, they both have the same top assist level.

Finally, based on what you describe for rides, you hardly need a suspension, much less a full suspension. The 7s is a great choice.
 

zipur

Active Member
Region
USA
Geesh, some real Trek haters here. Throttle? What's wrong with starting by pedal? Folks have done that for, what, 120 years or so?
Regarding weight limits, talk to your Trek dealer. They know far, far more than anonymous posters here that push their own agenda. These bike frames are pretty conservatively designed.
And for you non bosch folks, it seems the difference between the top level Bosch motors, CX or Speed, is in the speed limit. According to Bosch specs, they both have the same top assist level.
Finally, based on what you describe for rides, you hardly need a suspension, much less a full suspension. The 7s is a great choice.
Thanks to all for your input. I don't think I'm alone in this search. I don't view the comments as haters or fanboys; everyone has their own opinion. I believe that you get what you pay for, and I trust the CX Motor to handle things. I don't need the motor to drag me around; just give me a little help when needed. I would buy a scooter I wanted to twist and go. However, having both is an interesting thought. I've spent so much time focusing on the 7, I have tunnel vision, so I need input from others. I came across this YouTube video, not an Alliant, but it is Trek.


 
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theemartymac

Well-Known Member
I wouldn't write off the Trek as long as your LBS is willing to sell it to you. They have to process any warranty claims/work, so if they will support you, have at it.

I'm another 300+lb-er and have 2 Rize bikes, a hub and a mid (similar to A Hicks), and I commuted on my 750W hub bike for 1000+ km's all last summer - 3-4 days a week and a ~45km return trip - with NO problems. I carried a heavy pannier and laptop backpack with me every day and I'm sure I was 350+lbs loaded up. The bike still looks and performs as new despite it's supposed 300lb limit. Just don't go jumping curbs or hammering downhill trails until you lose some weight! lol

I ordered the 1000W mid drive version of that bike to be my permanent commuter as I wanted the extra power on the hills. It's doing fine at ~500kms other than some extra drivetrain wear, but that is on me and my hard duty cycle.

If you want to do long rides, you will most likely want to upgrade the seat. Stock seats are always compromises on even expensive bikes, because they are so personal there is no way to provide the "right" seat for every buyer. Just budget $50 and get a heavy metal springer/gel version and be happy. There are several good seat threads on the forums here and a few pretty reliable options for big riders.

At 6'2", you will need either a stem spacer to raise the bars, or new handlebars with more rise. No stock bike comes well fitted for anyone over 6 feet. Spacers are $20-30, new bars maybe $50. Grips can also be nice on long rides, but give it a few miles and see how it goes...

And I like my throttle to get the little bump at the bottom of a steep hill, or for stop and go traffic in the city. It does save the knees and makes for a nice helper on uphill starts, but your call...
 

Law

Active Member
Get a bulls bike heavy guy. They are in stock. The suspension will prevent a failure.
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Geesh, some real Trek haters here. Throttle? What's wrong with starting by pedal? Folks have done that for, what, 120 years or so?

Regarding weight limits, talk to your Trek dealer. They know far, far more than anonymous posters here that push their own agenda. These bike frames are pretty conservatively designed.

And for you non bosch folks, it seems the difference between the top level Bosch motors, CX or Speed, is in the speed limit. According to Bosch specs, they both have the same top assist level.

Finally, based on what you describe for rides, you hardly need a suspension, much less a full suspension. The 7s is a great choice.
Not sure who you mean by Trek haters in this thread. Actually, I called Trek corporate specifically to ask about this issue earlier today and they read the company line, which was that weight (360 lbs) is well is beyond Trek’s 300 lb weight limit. As an owner of an Allant+7, I could say it’s stout enough (IMO) to handle that weight but truth is, I don’t know (nor do you) AND I have questions about how a Trek dealer would react to warranty situations in this case.
Now, if the op wants to buy one and take the chance, that’s fine but as someone giving honest advice, I’m stating my honest concerns. My true advice, which is what he asked for.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
And you don't want a suspension bike. Trying to tune it for your (our) weight is a completely silly idea. That suspension is going to bottom out and stay that way from the time you get on it. That's one place where you would want to be paying attention to capacity. Easier to just avoid it.

And comments like "people have been starting off with pedals for 120 years"? Show me documentation where folks 70+ would even consider riding a bike like that 120 years ago. Or (partially) disabled? Or for that matter, folks that might be sitting on the couch watching TV. If a throttle helps get people off their butt, for God's sake, let them have a throttle! Get used to the concept for Pete's sake.... -Al
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
20% over their weight rating is really stretching it in my opinion. I doubt if the engineer worries about an simple static load that much over, but when you are 20% over and you hit a big pothole or jump a curb, you now are putting an extreme overloading on the frame and spokes! I'd suggest you look at a cargo bike. Many of them have a 400 pound load rating.
 

zipur

Active Member
Region
USA
Well I found a similar posts, which I should have read first. Not liking my choices, more thinking ahea



and then there is this monster post from Redit, which is a good read. Advice for Fat Riders from a former 300lb cyclist
 
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