Big Guy 6.3, 360 lb, 60 yr. In need of true advice

indianajo

Well-Known Member
I'm of a certain age, so to speak, with significant medical issues, and don't need a throttle. So don't give me the age and medical disability stuff. If you need a throttle, buy a motorcycle or proper motor scooter. Pedal assist is for bicycle riders.
Where did you do your service? Coast Guard? Pink ladies at the info desk of the hospital?
If I take one step & twist with weight on my knee, I can't walk for days without a cane. US Army Viet Nam era knees. If I crippled around without the aerobic exercise I get on a bike, I'd be dead from covid19 or brainless from a stroke already. The places I go, there is no chance of catching a wrecker home either. There are no street signs out there. The road names turn three intersections, then change names in the middle of a straight stretch. Happy for you your disease is so predictable.
Happy the OP found a couple of nice Treks.
 

retiredNH

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Where did you do your service? Coast Guard? Pink ladies at the info desk of the hospital?
Well, since you asked...Early 1970s. Just missed being shipped over to Viet Nam. Field Artillery in Germany, in a Pershing missile unit on alert much of the time waiting for WW III to start. Pershing duty in Germany back then was widely considered one of the worst assignments in Europe because of the frequent inspections, lots of field time (learned to sleep anywhere...) and little opportunity for leave. Learned that you can spend the day outside in 33 degree rain, wallowing in mud, and tolerate it.
Happy the OP found a couple of nice Treks.
 

zipur

Active Member
Region
USA
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Took a spill on my first 20-mile ride. The bike is fine, spokes, rim everything is good save for the fender post bent and misaligned. The more I ride this bike, the more I appreciate how sturdy it is.
This was totally a fatigue accident, meaning I was too tired to avoid the incident. Another rider was fooling with shifting & breaking, and as such, they were wiggling in front of me. It was on a downslope after an extended grinding incline. My entire body was dripping even with PA Sport engaged. I attempted to avoid a glancing broadside impact with the rider. I breaked, left turn, overcompensated and rolled off the bike. Taking a hit to the knee. I was so drained I could not get back up! I sat there for a while, and then my leg wouldn’t work. It took another person to help me up but I finished my run...slowly. Lesson learned, take it easy till I get in better sape, Learn the bike better. Diet, protein, vegetables, green shakes, hydrated before & during. And mostly keep your distance. Back at it tomorrow, No pain no gain, I gotta get to the first 100 miles
I guess if you haven't fell yet you’re headed for a spill in the future. Do you have any other suggestion to avoid road burn?
 
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Dallant

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
View attachment 88246 Took a spill on my first 20-mile ride. The bike is fine, spokes, rim everything is good save for the fender post bent and misaligned. The more I ride this bike, the more I appreciate how sturdy it is.
This was totally a fatigue accident, meaning I was too tired to avoid the incident. Another rider was fooling with shifting & breaking, and as such, they were wiggling in front of me. It was on a downslope after an extended grinding incline. My entire body was dripping even with PA Sport engaged. I attempted to avoid a glancing broadside impact with the rider. I breaked, left turn, overcompensated and rolled off the bike. Taking a hit to the knee. I was so drained I could not get back up! I sat there for a while, and then my leg wouldn’t work. It took another person to help me up but I finished my run...slowly. Lesson learned, take it easy till I get in better sape, Learn the bike better. Diet, protein, vegetables, green shakes, hydrated before & during. And mostly keep your distance. Back at it tomorrow, No pain no gain, I gotta get to the first 100 miles
I guess if you haven't fell yet you’re headed for a spill in the future. Do you have any other suggestion to avoid road burn?
Ouch! Yeah, keep a good braking distance!
 

retiredNH

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
In my decades of riding, both analog and ebike, I've had two spills. The most recent was when I first rode my first new bike in 30 years, last May. I forgot to check the shift setting. It was on the easiest gear. I went to start and my foot went immediately to the lowest position, and so did I. Nasty scrape on my knee and a cracked rib.

The first time was in grad school. I was riding on campus with another guy. He was on my right. He asked at one point if I was turning left, but did not wait for my answer, "no". His pedal went into my front spokes. I went over the handlebars. Amazingly, my only road burn was to my knees. Both palms survived, and no other injuries. Front fork on the bike was bent/totaled. Friend admitted later he fell off his bike in shock. Lesson learned was keep space and control.
 

kmccune

Active Member
I am serious, learn how to fall. There are good videos on this, the MTB group can really fill you in on how to stay with or ditch the bike. It makes a difference in a concussion, shattered knee, or a "greenstick fracture".
We used to ride without lights in the total dark with maybe a 2 cell among us, we had "fixies' which held the collision speeds down, swollen limbs and other scrapes and injuries among the group. The thing is we were young and much lighter( heals better) and could laugh it off, these days not so much. We would "Chicken fight" to 4AM and go to work the next day ( shudder).
Above all else be visible and careful .Higher speeds do not trump the joy of cycling, yesterday I was reminded again of my "mortality", I took a coughing fit that went into a spasm where my lungs wouldn't pull in air, horrible pain( thought I might die( if asthma is like this. People you have my sympathy!) finally was able to breathe again. the thing was I could have avoided this occurance probably by wearing a dust mask, the fit was brought on by a combination of old fiberglass insulation, mold, pollen and 50 yr old dirt and dust( not to mention the heat).
The thing is be safe out there, observe all safety rules and wear safety equipment( yes it could happen to any of us as the Veterans around here can attest.)
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Ouch....
That's a perfect example of a situation where you could use a throttle to get home....
 

zipur

Active Member
Region
USA
Ouch....
That's a perfect example of a situation where you could use a throttle to get home....
I thought about that, what if I could no longer peddle or even walk. I was on a bike path which runs along train tracks. Woods, squirrels and various critters. That could be an issues, wonder if there is a trottle hack or maybe use the "Walk Mode" while riding. I will be packing a med kit in the future.
 

Goodleg

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Pennsylvania
Thanks for posting this Zipur. And glad you are okay for the most part.
I am so nervous to ride a bicycle for the first time in 20-30- years.
However you do inspire me. Going to buy mine today.
Heal quickly.
 

zipur

Active Member
Region
USA
Thanks for posting this Zipur. And glad you are okay for the most part.
I am so nervous to ride a bicycle for the first time in 20-30- years.
However you do inspire me. Going to buy mine today.
Heal quickly.
take it slow test ride first for an extended amount of time. Some people prefer the Verve+, take your time.
 

EMGX

Well-Known Member
I'm of a certain age, so to speak, with significant medical issues, and don't need a throttle. So don't give me the age and medical disability stuff. If you need a throttle, buy a motorcycle or proper motor scooter. Pedal assist is for bicycle riders. I don't need to work hard if I don't want to, but just sitting on my butt not using my legs is not good for me or anyone else.
"Egocentrism refers to someone's inability to understand that another person's view or opinion may be different than their own. 1 It represents a cognitive bias, in that someone would assume that others share the same perspective as they do, unable to imagine that other people would have a perception of their own"

Not a positive trait.

I'm sure there are many bicyclists who ride non assist bikes who would opine that:
"I'm of a certain age, so to speak ... and don't need a ebike. So don't give me the age and medical disability stuff. If you need an ebike, buy a motorcycle or proper motor scooter and stay off the MUPs and out of the bike lane. Pedal assist is for mopeds."
 

retiredNH

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
"Egocentrism refers to someone's inability to understand that another person's view or opinion may be different than their own. 1 It represents a cognitive bias, in that someone would assume that others share the same perspective as they do, unable to imagine that other people would have a perception of their own"

Not a positive trait.

I'm sure there are many bicyclists who ride non assist bikes who would opine that:
"I'm of a certain age, so to speak ... and don't need a ebike. So don't give me the age and medical disability stuff. If you need an ebike, buy a motorcycle or proper motor scooter and stay off the MUPs and out of the bike lane. Pedal assist is for mopeds."
Wow. Hit a nerve with some of you throttle folks! Makes me think of a retirement community of folks cruising around with their throttles in the flatlands of Florida...
 

EMGX

Well-Known Member
Wow. Hit a nerve with some of you throttle folks! Makes me think of a retirement community of folks cruising around with their throttles in the flatlands of Florida...
I don't have a throttle on any of my ebikes. Most of the time I don't use any assist and ride in a very hilly/mountainous area, sometimes for rides up to 60-70 miles. For myself, I need an ebike to safely enjoy riding a bicycle anymore, I haven't found the need for a throttle nor has my wife who has significant orthopedic issues. Your attitude is the issue, not your choice of ebike features.
 

retiredNH

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I don't have a throttle on any of my ebikes. Most of the time I don't use any assist and ride in a very hilly/mountainous area, sometimes for rides up to 60-70 miles. For myself, I need an ebike to safely enjoy riding a bicycle anymore, I haven't found the need for a throttle nor has my wife who has significant orthopedic issues. Your attitude is the issue, not your choice of ebike features.
Lighten up a bit. We're not discussing life and death issues. You don't know my "attitude", but you sure don't seem to like differing opinions. You could have said simply "I don't agree" But no, you have to make it a personal attack. Sad.
 

EMGX

Well-Known Member
Lighten up a bit. We're not discussing life and death issues. You don't know my "attitude", but you sure don't seem to like differing opinions. You could have said simply "I don't agree" But no, you have to make it a personal attack. Sad.
Just stating the obvious based on your "my way is the only right way" posts. I've never wanted to put anyone on "ignore" before but there you go.
 

retiredNH

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Just stating the obvious based on your "my way is the only right way" posts. I've never wanted to put anyone on "ignore" before but there you go.
And my post was a response to those posters who said essentially that you must have a throttle. They could have said "I find a throttle to be nice" but they didn't. Enough of this though. I'll let you have the last word now.