Bike Fit is the singular most important key to proper cycling.

D

Deleted member 803

Guest
I see so many people hop on a bike, buy it, and take it home. No thought is given to geometry and proper riding position. If you decide to buy an ebike, your dealer should explore the type of riding you do, take some geometry measurements to ensure you are purchasing a frame size and design that works properly, and then give you a fitting after the bike is built by the dealer.

The attached video takes fitting to the extreme, but you will get the basics of what "fit" means.

 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
I watched the first three minutes so far, got to go riding now so I'll catch the rest later. However I already can see the rider has complained about lower back pain and hands going numb ... leaning over too far... needs to ride a hybrid bike instead of one of those contortionist specials.
 
D

Deleted member 803

Guest
I watched the first three minutes so far, got to go riding now so I'll catch the rest later. However I already can see the rider has complained about lower back pain and hands going numb ... leaning over too far... needs to ride a hybrid bike instead of one of those contortionist specials.
I'll disagree here. Numb hands have little to do with lean angle. Typically it is an issue with improperly adjusted reach, controls or handlebar placement. Leaning over on a bicycle is actually better for the back and serves to mitigate road shock. Straight up riding positions provide significantly more blunt force trauma to the lower back. For most casual riders who ride short distances for fun it probably makes little difference, but for those who use bikes for longer range use and fitness, fit is critical not only for comfort but for maximizing power to the pedal.

Another point: for anyone who has any serious cycling intent, a clip-in pedal system is critical to proper leg and foot alignment and power.
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
Those with "serious cycling intents" usually don't ride ebikes as their serious cycle, which implies a sportif usage, perhaps events sanctioned by the US Cycling Association. Of course some (like Ravi K.) do serious touring, but most people are using ebikes for commuting, recreation, and are not participating in racing events.
 

Brian(J)

Active Member
I am surprised more people don't have wrist and shoulder issues from mountain bike 'broomstick' handlebars. I had a lot of pain and had to go for PT- it was bad. Swapped to Jones "H bars" and solved the problem.
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
My regular hybrid (Specialized) bike came with those broomstick handlebars and I had shoulder and neck problems, but in my case it was more from the riding position, which was too low/aggressive for my neck, upper back, and shoulders. First we tried a longer stem so I would be more stretched out, but that only made the issue worse, then it was clear I needed be in a less aggressive riding position and the stem was raised about 3" and that worked to take the pressure off.
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
He raised the saddle, then he lowered the saddle.. He adjusted her helmet forward, but left it too loose. My favorite part was where he had her try a whole range of saddles from the same company ... no variety. "Usually someone can tell within a few seconds if the saddle is right for them". I don't think so...
 
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tinasdude

Active Member
Had similar problems on a walgoose fat bike. One size fits all. Stem riser, adjustable stem, Jones loop bars, suntour suspension seat post, plush seat, Sunrace mega, lighter tubes and tires. Now no issues. The cockpit can be changed to make the bike better. Appropriate sizing is paramount to really enjoying a bike.