Bike lock for a city that's not very bike friendly

indianajo

Well-Known Member
Somebody should sell a cable with a magnesium core. The metal that catches fire when you grind on it.
 

Joecreed

Member
Thanks so much for all the help everyone. For some reason I wasn't getting notifications that people were replying. I will be good at home, as I'm able to keep it inside my home locked up. Well hopefully I'm good lol. Another question for you guys...What is the best way to run the locks through the Benno RemiDemi?
 

bikeman242

Active Member
If you don't mind the weight penalty, a 5 foot Pewag 1/2" chain combined with the Viro EuroMonolith lock is your best bet. Check westechrigging.com
 

goldconch

Active Member
Good low down @aaronhamlin. From my experience, the $15 115dB alarms on Amazon/ebay are loud AF for the money, and can zip under the seat, though not very durable longterm. I had one spectacularly disassemble on a ride - so recommend a zip tie around the middle to keep halves together. The $50 juiced horn has an accelerometer theft mode which will sound the horn if bike is molested, also very loud. The Boomerang horn is not very loud, but the telemetry is useful when it's charged. Standby time for us has been disappointing. They've just changed their communication protocols for locking/unlocking and much better. I also use ABUS frame lock with 1m chain. They come in a variety of tire clearance widths and security class levels, some of which are necessary minimums for household insurance claims. Combo of all these things, including the red flashing "armed" warning light on Boomerang, has presented so far, sufficient theft hassle for daylight parking for us. Lots of easier targets around.
 

aaronhamlin

New Member
Region
USA
City
Chicago, IL
Good low down @aaronhamlin. From my experience, the $15 115dB alarms on Amazon/ebay are loud AF for the money, and can zip under the seat, though not very durable longterm. I had one spectacularly disassemble on a ride - so recommend a zip tie around the middle to keep halves together. The $50 juiced horn has an accelerometer theft mode which will sound the horn if bike is molested, also very loud. The Boomerang horn is not very loud, but the telemetry is useful when it's charged. Standby time for us has been disappointing. They've just changed their communication protocols for locking/unlocking and much better. I also use ABUS frame lock with 1m chain. They come in a variety of tire clearance widths and security class levels, some of which are necessary minimums for household insurance claims. Combo of all these things, including the red flashing "armed" warning light on Boomerang, has presented so far, sufficient theft hassle for daylight parking for us. Lots of easier targets around.
Nice first-hand insight on the audible alarm systems. I think my own attraction to accelerometer systems is less about audible alarms (not sure how I feel about accidental triggers and adding to noise pollution). What I really like is the phone notification. I'm curious how you've found the battery life on the Boomerang to work as a practical matter. Any other insights you can share about your experience with it?
 

goldconch

Active Member
Nice first-hand insight on the audible alarm systems. I think my own attraction to accelerometer systems is less about audible alarms (not sure how I feel about accidental triggers and adding to noise pollution). What I really like is the phone notification. I'm curious how you've found the battery life on the Boomerang to work as a practical matter. Any other insights you can share about your experience with it?
@aaronhamlin, we were among first deliveries and there were some teething issues, as with any startup new tech. We had some standby drain issues. Boomerang delivered us replacement batteries, and it was fairly straight forward to open the enclosure and do the surgery. After that, so far so good. Standby is days, not weeks...but that's fine if you're recharging anyway. I have a USB port on my bike controller that can recharge it quickly and the battery percentage can be read in app or with BlueFruit. I like seeing how much gas money we safe by riding our bikes.

Also sidebar: I bought a "bisecu" digital hub lock that was dead on arrival, and company seems to be done. Don't recommend those! lols.
 

aaronhamlin

New Member
Region
USA
City
Chicago, IL
@aaronhamlin, we were among first deliveries and there were some teething issues, as with any startup new tech. We had some standby drain issues. Boomerang delivered us replacement batteries, and it was fairly straight forward to open the enclosure and do the surgery. After that, so far so good. Standby is days, not weeks...but that's fine if you're recharging anyway. I have a USB port on my bike controller that can recharge it quickly and the battery percentage can be read in app or with BlueFruit. I like seeing how much gas money we safe by riding our bikes.

Also sidebar: I bought a "bisecu" digital hub lock that was dead on arrival, and company seems to be done. Don't recommend those! lols.
Super helpful. But they're on version two now with the Boomerang system, right? https://shop.boomerangbike.com/collections/products/products/boomerang-cyclotrac-v2
 

goldconch

Active Member
Super helpful. But they're on version two now with the Boomerang system, right? https://shop.boomerangbike.com/collections/products/products/boomerang-cyclotrac-v2
Yes, a smaller form factor than the original one, different internal hardware vendor, software, and communication protocols. App gets regular updates, and new "firmware" update a couple weeks ago was pushed to devices remotely.

IMO ebikes that cost >$1000 should come with integrated security considerations, instead of bike security being some kind of afterthought. With analogue bikes it can be a choose your own adventure, but at the electric bike ticket price, playtime is over. eg. My bike comes with a custom $400 12lb li-ion seat post secured with a quick release. What planet are these designers on? Had to make a custom seat post leash with 10mm stainless cable.
 

aaronhamlin

New Member
Region
USA
City
Chicago, IL
Yes, a smaller form factor than the original one, different internal hardware vendor, software, and communication protocols. App gets regular updates, and new "firmware" update a couple weeks ago was pushed to devices remotely.

IMO ebikes that cost >$1000 should come with integrated security considerations, instead of bike security being some kind of afterthought. With analogue bikes it can be a choose your own adventure, but at the electric bike ticket price, playtime is over. eg. My bike comes with a custom $400 12lb li-ion seat post secured with a quick release. What planet are these designers on? Had to make a custom seat post leash with 10mm stainless cable.
I couldn't agree with you more. Because everything is after the fact, you're also taking up tube space with the Boomerang. And it's obvious that it's there, so it's a clearer target for removal (although some may argue that it's a deterrent).

Riese and Muller at least includes a cafe lock and Borda folding lock with its bikes. That said, I don't think their Borda lock is good enough to include (I'm actually getting a credit on it with my current bike purchase because I plan to replace it with something better).

But as you point out, many bikes are expensive, like over $5K or $10K expensive. You shouldn't have bike security as an afterthought. Cars don't do that. I have seen some bikes that are smartly including these options, but those I have seen tend to be available only to those in Europe. Europe also does a better job with locks and security in general, so maybe there's something there. Anyway, totally agree. Bikes need to come integrated with security systems, particularly notification accelerometers and GPS trackers.
 

Oliverjane

New Member
Region
USA
The most secure type of lock is a D-lock or a U-lock. It has a hardened shackle that cannot be easily defeated by tools. The only disadvantage of this kind of lock is that it is not portable compared to others.
 
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goldconch

Active Member
It has a hardened shackle that cannot be easily defeated by tools.
Cutting, yes. From a rank amateur, 90 seconds, two cans of compressed keyboard air duster $10, one hammer $15. Process can probably be shortened to 2 or 3 strikes from someone who does that for their "living" and isn't filming with their phone with the other hand.

 

Marcela

Well-Known Member
I'm going to start making grocery runs so felt a proper security system was in order.

I ordered the Abus 9" D lock and in addition a 6' x 3/8" square link chain with big honking padlock for when the D lock doesn't work. I've locked to trees and other stationary objects at times. Another 10 lbs on a 57 lbs mule shouldn't hurt too much. Though two sacks of groceries on the front was noticeable to the steering.
 

Marcela

Well-Known Member
The Abus showed up. That’s a tank.
I sent the 6’ chain back and ordered a 10’. For $24 more I can cut the chain and have both a 6’ and 4’😁.
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
I backed this Kickstarter campaign by the folks at Hiplock ... I will be interested to give it a test, locking up my expensive bikes in my downtown whilst at work ... main drawback, apart from high cost, is it is a little small for being able to lock the Tern GSD cargo bike to a rack (sometimes hard to get that bike right next to a rack and I have to use a cable instead).


 

goldconch

Active Member
Bike lock manufacturer literature misdirect to the fabled angle grinder attack. Sadly, in most cases, it seems that all that separates open and closed states in name-brand D and padlocks for bad guys is a swivelling "tab"of metal mechanically engaged with a tiny music-box sized pocket key. The keyboard cleaner compressed air with hammer blow attack seems to apply simple metallurgy physics, and could be done in broad daylight at busy intersections, and without power tools. If anyone bothers to involve themselves, "lost my key and saw this online". There is no perfect solution on that score that I can see, but I would submit that a $15 Amazon alarm, or IoT smart alarm, that a thief can't easily silence or disable, multiplies the re-incarceration risk to that thief during a conventional attack because it signals that this jerk not only doesn't have a key, but also neither the control to turn off the alarm.
 
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Taylor57

Well-Known Member
Bike lock manufacturer literature misdirect to the fabled angle grinder attack. Sadly, in most cases, it seems that all that separates open and closed states in name-brand D and padlocks for bad guys is a swivelling "tab"of metal mechanically engaged with a tiny music-box sized pocket key. The keyboard cleaner compressed air with hammer blow attack seems to apply simple metallurgy physics, and could be done in broad daylight at busy intersections, and without power tools. If anyone bothers to involve themselves, "lost my key and saw this online". There is no perfect solution on that score that I can see, but I would submit that a $15 Amazon alarm, or IoT smart alarm, that a thief can't easily silence or disable, multiplies the re-incarceration risk to that thief during a conventional attack because it signals that this person not only doesn't have a key, but also neither the control to turn off the alarm.

I have the above mentioned 15 dollar Amazon alarm on all my bikes just because. I also have the Krptonite Ulocks and cables. The Amazon alarm is really annoying and loud!
 

goducks21

Member
Region
USA
Cutting, yes. From a rank amateur, 90 seconds, two cans of compressed keyboard air duster $10, one hammer $15. Process can probably be shortened to 2 or 3 strikes from someone who does that for their "living" and isn't filming with their phone with the other hand.

He's also hitting it as it's sits on something solid. He may not get that if the lock is just hanging off the bike and what ever it's locked too.