Bike repair stand

Brambor

Well-Known Member
I would be interested hearing recommendations and advice about purchasing/utilizing a bike repair stand. They seem to go about $150 and up. A purchase of this magnitude deserves a talkabout. :)
 

James

Well-Known Member
With the weight of ebikes it's a must, if you plan on doing your own bike maintenance.
 

EddieJ

Well-Known Member
I must admit that I have thought about buying a stand on a few occasions, but I seem to manage quite nicely by having the bike suspended from the workshop roof, via two straps. One at the seatpost end, and one at the handlebar end.

It works for me, and was free. :)
 

Dave

Active Member
I use the Park PCS-9 and it has worked out very well. It is very sturdy, doesn't tip over and does not damage the bike in any way. The only downside is height adjustment is via an allen wrench vs a speed clamp.
 

Aushiker

Active Member
I use a Feedback Sports Pro Elite stand for my diamond frame bikes and my recumbents (so at the heavier end) but haven't tried with an e-bike. Works well for me, even with the less suited recumbents. I have heaps of photos of the stand if interested at Google + but this is it in action with one of the bikes ...

recumbent-bike-in-feedback-sports-pro-elite-stand.jpg

Regards
Andrew
 

Court

Administrator
Staff member
Great question Brambor... I was just working on an ebike kit review today and kept struggling to keep the wheels straight, get the chain re-aligned (had to fix the rear tire) and then setup the wires for the switch etc. Not a lot of fun without a stand :(

Growing up I was taught to flip my bike upside down to work on the wheels and drive train. I put that method into practice again today and it worked pretty well (but did tear up my grips a little).
 

Brambor

Well-Known Member
yeah that is what I did growing up. It worked ok especially when our shifters were not located on the handlebars.
With all the stuff on he handlebars today I would definitely prefer a stand.
 

Court

Administrator
Staff member
I agree Brambor. If you're like me (looking to save some money and don't have a lot of room) something like this could be a halfway solution. Instead of lifting the bike completely up (using the seat post) the Ibera Easy Utility Bicycle Stand just holds the rear wheel up and stabilizes the bike.

ibera-easy-utility-bicycle-stand.jpg rubber-bands-hold-bike-frame.jpg basic-bicycle-stabilizing-stand.jpg

I like how it cradles the chain stays versus having to connect to the rear spindle like a bike trainer or something. It does include little black rubber bands to secure the frame but it's probably not as stable as a full sized rack. Still... it's better than a kickstand and only $23 bucks :)
 

Bernie Conry

New Member
I just built a bike stand. I got several ideas on You Tube. I have a real strong bench vice, I can place a 3/4 inch pipe in the vice then attach a pipe clamp on the end, this holds the bike it works great. I have a triangle framed bike, It attaches very easily to the cross member. On a step through it would attach to the seat post
 

Court

Administrator
Staff member
That's awesome Bernie! Great idea and a good way to save some money and space. Thanks for sharing :)
 

Brambor

Well-Known Member
I use the Park PCS-9 and it has worked out very well. It is very sturdy, doesn't tip over and does not damage the bike in any way. The only downside is height adjustment is via an allen wrench vs a speed clamp.
our local shop had 20% off sale so today I bought the pcs-9 as well as this bar that lets you hook the seat and handlebars stem and then raise the bar to the pcs-9clamp.

I put it all together and tested it by replacing the pedals on my wires hybrid bike. Glad to have bought this thing. It works great.
 

Vern

Active Member
When I put together my bike I just used the bike carrier that attaches to the trailer hitch. It now serve two functions!! I can't imagine a stand would be any better, but I have never used one so I don't know. 150 bucks sounds too steep for me!! When I tried to change my flat, however, I found it to be annoying because I could not put enough force on the bolts to get them off without the bike moving around. To take off my flat, I did the old school method of turning my bike upside down. That worked best!!
 

Brambor

Well-Known Member
mine was 130 plus 10 for the bar, with the discount it came to around 105. I have 6 bikes in the household of which 3 are relics that I plan on reviving. I will use the stand to work in the basement or in the driveway when it is nice outside. I plan on electrifying either a folding bike or an old Schwinn, maybe with Copenhagen wheel. We will see...
 

Dave

Active Member
I never used a bike stand before buying the Carbon. I did O.K, but like Vern said, at times it was difficult to do certain things without wrestling the bike around. Now that I have the stand, working on the bike is so much easier, especially with the added weight of an ebike. Where I really found it to be of help was in tweaking the derailleurs, and being able to turn the pedals and change gears easily. I think I bought mine for around $125 with free shipping from Amazon prime.
 

Vern

Active Member
I guess it would be worth it if I actually knew something about working on bikes. This summer I plan to educate myself on the basics of brake and derailer adjustment. Is it possible to true a wheel by yourself?? I usually take my bike in for that stuff. Now that my kids have grown into nondisposable bikes, I really need to know more about basic adjustments. Last year I bought both of my kids some pretty nice Specialized bikes. My daughter's rear derailer needs some adjustment from time to time but it may just be the twist shifter. I really don't like those things.
 

Aushiker

Active Member
I guess it would be worth it if I actually knew something about working on bikes. This summer I plan to educate myself on the basics of brake and derailer adjustment. Is it possible to true a wheel by yourself?? I usually take my bike in for that stuff. Now that my kids have grown into nondisposable bikes, I really need to know more about basic adjustments. Last year I bought both of my kids some pretty nice Specialized bikes. My daughter's rear derailer needs some adjustment from time to time but it may just be the twist shifter. I really don't like those things.
A good resource for learning about bike maintenance is the Park Tool Repair Help and Education website plus of course forums such as this, Google and YouTube.

Andrew
 

Court

Administrator
Staff member
When I put together my bike I just used the bike carrier that attaches to the trailer hitch. It now serve two functions!!
Awesome idea about using your car rack for holding your bike when you do maintenance Vern!

trailer-hitch-bike-rack-as-repair-stand.jpg

Everyone's links to the tutorial videos and Park Tools articles are great... I recently took a free class at my local REI that talked about bike maintenance basics. I found it on the local REI website under events. It was a fun way to meet other bike enthusiasts and get hands on with demo bikes with someone who knew what they were doing ;)