Bike riding etiquette

Taylor57

Active Member
I notice in my morning Ebike travels I see other bikers. 99% of them are young(er) acoustic bikers with the tight shorts, tight shirt, shoes clamped into some fancy pedals and riding the skinny, what we used to refer to as 10 speeds. I wave to every one that I come across. So far in about 20 rides, I don't think one has waved back. Do the 10 speed riders not like us Ebike warriors? Is there a secret wave?
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
Usually just a head nod is the regular acknowledgment. Maybe a single finger lift off the grip will do as well. The way you describe those cyclists in detail seems to imply some bit of disdain on your part. There is as wide of divide between cyclists as there are for wearing masks in public. It's the world we live in today.
 

WattsUpDude

Member
I swear my intention is not to be rude but when i'm commuting, i'm just trying to get to work or get home. Now if I noticed someone giving me a nod or a wave, I'll certainly return the acknowledgement but I won't go out of my way to initiate it. And really, I see dozens of different cyclists on my way to and from San Francisco. That would get really tiring.
 

fooferdoggie

Well-Known Member
I swear my intention is not to be rude but when i'm commuting, i'm just trying to get to work or get home. Now if I noticed someone giving me a nod or a wave, I'll certainly return the acknowledgement but I won't go out of my way to initiate it. And really, I see dozens of different cyclists on my way to and from San Francisco. That would get really tiring.
me too I have gotten bell rings but I am not fast enough to do it back.
 

Cowlitz

Well-Known Member
I wave at other cyclists all the time, and they all wave back. Heck, I wave at cars and most of them wave back, unless operated by tourons.

Guess I just live in a friendly place.
Purdy much the same here. I finally saw another bicycler and I think it was an ebike. We both grinned and waved and "Morninged". About half the cars and pickups are wavers, and most are very polite drivers, although I wish diesels were quieter. There are no bike trails or lanes here in my slice of the world.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
I notice in my morning Ebike travels I see other bikers. 99% of them are young(er) acoustic bikers with the tight shorts, tight shirt, shoes clamped into some fancy pedals and riding the skinny, what we used to refer to as 10 speeds. I wave to every one that I come across. So far in about 20 rides, I don't think one has waved back. Do the 10 speed riders not like us Ebike warriors? Is there a secret wave?
I was one of those guys for years and there is a secret handshake... try the head nod or the finger wave next time.


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Taylor57

Active Member
I was one of those guys for years and there is a secret handshake... try the head nod or the finger wave next time.


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Looks great just ordered!
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
My observation from Poland is that while the most of cyclists on roads (and especially on trails) return the greeting (a nod, hand lifted, or a finger lifted -- and the trail riders say "Hi!"), many of the suburban road cyclists (the spandex types) don't react to the greeting at all. Well. I just say "a boor!" when I have passed him :)
 

Sifu Ben

Member
The faster the riders are, the less likely they wave or wave back. They don't have bells on their bikes. They are looking down at the wheel in front of them as they draft, concentrating on cadence, power output, heart rate, gearing, pacelines, speed and trying not to crash. The worst are the self-absorbed triathlete types (tri geeks) who are loners going for their PRs. They have no riding skill other than turning the cranks in a gadawful position. They definitely can't look up or take their hands off their aerobars to wave.
 

Sifu Ben

Member
To me, bike etiquette means calling hazards, yelling "passing on your left" or "slowing" or "car back" when riding with others and using hand signals to show intent to turn or stop. Etiquette is also following traffic rules when bikes are using the road to travel, as opposed to trails or bike lanes.