Blood Thinners and Biking

Cowlitz

Well-Known Member
A friend of mine had a heart malfunction. She was put on blood thinners after a clot occurred. She is now thinking she can't go bike riding. Is anybody on here taking blood thinner medication? How do you handle the risk of bruises and such? You can pm me if you wish. I'd like to be helpful as we've had lots of fun riding around on roads in the woods.
 

Solom01

Well-Known Member
Hi Cowlitz. I'm on blood thinners and have been for years...it never stopped me from biking but, unfortunately, it's all going to depend on her exact situation which only her doctor will know. In my particular case I just bruise a bit more easily than most and if I were to fall I would bleed for a bit longer, but the benefits of exercise (especially cardio-vascular exercise) far outweigh the very slight extra risk that I take when biking. I know a generalized answer like this won't help much, but having her ask her doctor would allow her to make her own risk/benefit analysis and if her doctor tells her to go for it - which will most likely be the case - it will make her feel more comfortable. After all, none of us what to encourage her to do something which in her particular case might be risky.
 

Saratoga Dave

Well-Known Member
I’ve been on Eliquis for a few years now for A/Fib. In that time I’ve done just under (less than a hundred miles to go) 10,000 miles on my ebikes. No downhill mountain bike stuff, but pretty much everything else; mostly bike paths, and secondary paved roads, any dirt or gravel roads I can find. Lots of paths through the woods.

I carry several wound powder kits in my handlebar bag and I’m careful. That’s about all I can say. At 68 years old I just refuse to give up something I love so much and that has so many other benefits for my health.

I was always a clipless pedal guy in my pre ebike days... I now use flats, so I don’t have a risk of falling over clipped in. One side of the pedals has no pins, the other extremely short ones! There’s not much else you can really do. I do have a Road ID bracelet that lists the cardiac and blood thinner drugs so hopefully if I end up conked out someplace a paramedic will see it.

Right now we’ve got this damn coronavirus going of course, so my wife and have pretty much taken ourselves off the grid as far as activity outside the house. The sole exception is the bike. I don’t think there’s too much virus risk involved in a good 30 mile ride along the river trail, and the good it does me far outweighs anything else.

CVS, Walgreens, any of the drug chains US or otherwise sells those emergency kits.

I do 99% of my riding alone, often way the hell out in the bushes. Your friend is fortunate to have someone to ride with that can help out if she falls off and needs some assistance.
 

Cowlitz

Well-Known Member
Thanks for your answers. I'm not going to pressure her at all, I will ask her to talk to the doctor next time. Right now she's in shock that so much has happened. Saratoga Dave, I think she has the same heart condition. Nothing could be found to be wrong, but she had one episode of passing out and rapid heart beat. They installed a gizmo to shock the heart if that happened again, and I suspect that bit of surgery caused the clot.

I will offer to carry medical stuff when the time is right. That is if I can find it. This %$# virus stuff has caused a lot of bare shelves here. I wish we were done with it!
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
Seeking anecdotal medical advice from a group of eBike enthusiasts should only be considered as random conversation and not to be used to make a decision. No one understands the medical complexities of your friend better than her doctor! Since she had a cardiac malfunction, that should carry more concern than blood thinners and bruising.
 

Cowlitz

Well-Known Member
Seeking anecdotal medical advice from a group of eBike enthusiasts should only be considered as random conversation and not to be used to make a decision. No one understands the medical complexities of your friend better than her doctor! Since she had a cardiac malfunction, that should carry more concern than blood thinners and bruising.

Uh, I was only interested in seeing if other folks had found ways to cope. My friend is the only one who will decide. I think you assume too much from an on line conversation.
 

tomjasz

Well-Known Member
I believe I can mitigate some of the risk. I wear mechanics gloves and kevlar sleeves when working on a project. I always wear riding gloves and recently actually wear a helmet. IME gloves are the most important. I always have bruised hands and arms.

1584035779535.png
 

Cowlitz

Well-Known Member
I believe I can mitigate some of the risk. I wear mechanics gloves and kevlar sleeves when working on a project. I always wear riding gloves and recently actually wear a helmet. IME gloves are the most important. I always have bruised hands and arms.

View attachment 47308
Yuckers. I'm not on any blood thinners but I now get that on the back of my hands whenever I bash them. I call it O.L.D. bruising. My mom's hands did the same thing.
 

tomjasz

Well-Known Member
Yuckers. I'm not on any blood thinners but I now get that on the back of my hands whenever I bash them. I call it O.L.D. bruising. My mom's hands did the same thing.
Other medications, my stroke meds, do the same thing. That internet picture in reality is much more gross.
 

dAz63

Member
Yes I was on blood thinners for four years after having stents installed, never stopped riding, in fact had to do exercise and found it too boring to walk long distances.

Only downsides was you bruise easier and a simple scratch just bleeds, like a pedal scratch on the leg can look like a large gash with blood running down the leg, but when cleaned off the actual scratch can be quite hard to find.

Carry some bandaids, they can help.
 

GypsyTreker

Well-Known Member
Amazing how many suffer this. I do. My hands can look like they have been beaten just from hitching up our aFrame trailer or bikerack. The VA wasn't concerned so I'm not. The biggest downside is staining clothes. I won't give up riding, now that I can again. Perhaps your friend simply isn't interested in riding like you and this is a polite way to beg off.
 

PatriciaK

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Pacific Northwest and Piedmont Triad
I'm on Xarelto forever due to recurring pulmonary embolism. I'm very careful with my riding - stick to paved paths and less-traveled rural roads. Truthfully, I'm a bit nervous about suffering a serious mishap, but I'm so happy to be on a bike again! I don't want to stop living my life, so I just try to take it easy, and take it slow.
 

JimFMB

Active Member
I have been on thinners for almost four years. I do carry a first aid kit for an occasional cut or abrasion. The worst situation was when I came flying over the handlebars to avoid getting hit by a car and landed on my belly. My belly acted as an air bag and my ego was hurt more than anything else. The next day though, my stomach was one huge bruise as purple as a plum. The benefit of riding is by far more beneficial for managing my cardiovascular issues.
 

Smong

Member
I am mid 60's, have leukemia and was riding MTB daily right into my diagnosis. My body was a mess with bruises everywhere from pretty much no platelets at all in my blood. A mixed blessing was that I didn't have many RBCs either so not very aggressive riding. After chemo I was left with severe arrythmias from heart damage we suspect. I went on Xaralto for only a couple weeks then was restarted and put on some meds that are working so far. When/if they stop working, a pacemaker is next. A year later and I had a smallish stroke but no more blood thinners recommended and my heart is working pretty well but not perfectly.
My non medical advice is to work through it, take precautions like always carry super glue, bandages, tourniquets, and clotting wound dressings but have fun. Of course talk to your doctor but be aware that most will take the most conservative route for insurance reasons. My philosophy is that it's better to burnout than to fade away, you know the song, rust never sleeps....😉
 

tomjasz

Well-Known Member
I am mid 60's, have leukemia and was riding MTB daily right into my diagnosis. My body was a mess with bruises everywhere from pretty much no platelets at all in my blood. A mixed blessing was that I didn't have many RBCs either so not very aggressive riding. After chemo I was left with severe arrythmias from heart damage we suspect. I went on Xaralto for only a couple weeks then was restarted and put on some meds that are working so far. When/if they stop working, a pacemaker is next. A year later and I had a smallish stroke but no more blood thinners recommended and my heart is working pretty well but not perfectly.
My non medical advice is to work through it, take precautions like always carry super glue, bandages, tourniquets, and clotting wound dressings but have fun. Of course talk to your doctor but be aware that most will take the most conservative route for insurance reasons. My philosophy is that it's better to burnout than to fade away, you know the song, rust never sleeps....😉
Heart attacks plural, TIA aka Ministroke, kidney damage, and a pacemaker. I feel safer on my bikes. For me I stay positive simply because I completely finished my bucket list. 47 years with the same girl. She encouraged my Peter Pan lifestyle. I did dumb down the speeds I ride at. No sense in complete testing of emergency services. Retired at 57 with enough toys, until eBikes. Perhaps the pinnacle of fun adventures. I get much satisfaction assisting other old farts kitting their bikes.
 

Smong

Member
Thomas,
Sounds so similar to me, only married 42 years, retired at 58, plenty of toys. Was tough to have to give up my Adventure bike. No heart attacks so far but have been in kidney failure since chemo and now have a malignant tumor on a kidney. Still need a pedal fishing kayak because I am sick of fishing from my big boat...and want to live it up while I can. Life is short so make the most of your time.
Take care everyone.