Bosch/Yamaha throttle? ever?

olddog

New Member
I own a fat tire heavy Mtn. bike that runs a BBSHD. I love it, as it has a throttle. I'm 70 YEARS old and need a throttle. I now have difficulty getting my leg over to mount my monster. I am looking for a step thru bike with a BBSHD or other powerful mid drive with a throttle. Am I going to have to build one. Stunner is fair and my wife has one but is is a BBS02, which I will probably burn up. Any conversion frame suggestions or a factory built option. Requirements area large reliable mid-drive motor, throttle, Step thru frame. IGH would be a plus.
 

Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
Change your motor over to a step-through "flat foot technology" Townie! I have a lot of customers putting BBSHD kits on Electra Townies, and KHS Smoothie step-through bikes. The only caveat is battery mounting, but on the longer wheelbase of the flat foot bikes, a battery rides very well on the rear rack. Not that tipsy feeling as on some frames.
 

JayVee

Well-Known Member
I doubt you'll see a Bosch powered bike with a throttle in the US soon. But your title says "ever", so I'll entertain you with a puzzling little piece of trivia: some Bosch powered class 3 bikes sold in other markets actually have a limited throttle feature. Yes, you read that correctly.

Swiss company Flyer has a feature for class 3 bikes that they call a “setting off aid”. It's a button that brings the bike up to a speed of 18km/h and then cuts off after a while. So in Bosch’s OEM kit, there’s the possibility of having some sort of throttle...

It's listed on the spec sheet of many HS Flyer e-bikes, such as these:


This feature is possible due to an oddly twisted Swiss law, which states that if a class 3 bike can't be throttled past 20km/h its rider will be exempt from wearing a full blown motorbike helmet. Although the vehicle itself will still considered a moped, it will benefit from Switzerland's vastly simplified laws which govern that category.
 

Manu

Active Member
but that is just a button to reach cruising speed and goodbye, it is clear that modifying or altering the firware or program the system could be completely different but that will not happen.The pedelec are a very safe element, of all sold these years in Spain they have only had 3000 serious accidents for their owner comparing it to electric scooters, where they had 145,000 serious incidents for their owner


when I say serious is that they needed hospitalization
 
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Over50

Well-Known Member
I doubt you'll see a Bosch powered bike with a throttle in the US soon...
Best to hear it from Bosch themselves ... starting at about 11 minutes of this video the 5 primary challenges for Bosch on entrance to the NA market are addressed. # 3 on the list is the throttle. The explanation of Bosch's perspective on that is after the 12:30 mark:

 

olddog

New Member
I doubt you'll see a Bosch powered bike with a throttle in the US soon. But your title says "ever", so I'll entertain you with a puzzling little piece of trivia: some Bosch powered class 3 bikes sold in other markets actually have a limited throttle feature. Yes, you read that correctly.

Swiss company Flyer has a feature for class 3 bikes that they call a “setting off aid”. It's a button that brings the bike up to a speed of 18km/h and then cuts off after a while. So in Bosch’s OEM kit, there’s the possibility of having some sort of throttle...

It's listed on the spec sheet of many HS Flyer e-bikes, such as these:


This feature is possible due to an oddly twisted Swiss law, which states that if a class 3 bike can't be throttled past 20km/h its rider will be exempt from wearing a full blown motorbike helmet. Although the vehicle itself will still considered a moped, it will benefit from Switzerland's vastly simplified laws which govern that category.
Nice looking bike as well with Rohloff Thanks! Great find. I bet "Setting off aid" will be appearing on other bikes as well. Bosch had to be involved obviously. Great assist for older folks who need it.
Thanks again, OLDDOG