Brake Pads

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Could it be that the high end ebikes outsell the low cost ebikes in Europe? Judging from the price range of most prospective ebike owners asking for advice on this site, low cost ebikes seem to outsell the high end ebikes by an order of magnitude.
The number of ebikes in Europe is of order of magnitude greater than it is in North America. Everybody laughs at silly and restrictive EU ebike laws. Yet, you can ride with your ebike into any national forest in Europe because ebike is defined as a bike here.
 

Gionnirocket

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Y. O.
P.S. Let us take Norway as example. Norway, same as Switzerland is not in the EU but the country follows EU rules. And Norway is very rich, and it's the leader in EV. What sells in Norway? Riese and Müller. Moustache. Tern. And plethora of expensive e-MTB. No space for Bafang.
Well since Norwegian Airlines is one of the lowest cost no frills airlines... I think you may be in for a rude awakening once the tariffs are bypassed
 

RunForTheHills

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
The number of ebikes in Europe is of order of magnitude greater than it is in North America. Everybody laughs at silly and restrictive EU ebike laws. Yet, you can ride with your ebike into any national forest in Europe because ebike is defined as a bike here.
There is no doubt that there are a lot of barriers to ebike adoption in North America. I wasn't questioning the total market size, just the statement that Bafang couldn't capture market share with a low cost motor in Europe. It is not worth arguing about though. I don't have a dog in the race and I tend to buy high end products myself.
 

BlackHand

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Western WA
Name a single modern e-bike made back in 2015.
Aren't a large # of ebikes in EU using a Bosch system released in 2014-2015? My bike was bought new 1 year ago, with an Intuvia display released in 2014 and gen2 speed DU released in 2015(?)...
 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I just ordered some SRAM compatible pads. 4 Pairs for $13 including shipping. That again is eight pads! Better to pop in some fresh pads for mountain road rides than to wait until they start acting up with a rotor rubbing a caliper. Oh, that is not bronze. It is paint. I like to bend the top ears out slightly.
1622680640154.png
 

john peck

Well-Known Member
I just replaced my OEM rear Shimano brake pads at almost 8000 km. They started making noise yesterday, and they were worn right down when I replaced them today. Still worked fine though. There appears to be lots of life left in the front pads. Easier job than I expected!
The simplest method seems to be to remove the brake & while holding in hand with cable still attached, change pads, 2 bolts.
 

Latitude

Well-Known Member
The simplest method seems to be to remove the brake & while holding in hand with cable still attached, change pads, 2 bolts.
I didn’t do that John, just removed the wheel. Then I pulled the cotter pin, slid the old pads out with their spring and pushed the pistons in. Slid the new pads with spring in, inserted and bent the supplied new cotter pin. Reinstalled the wheel. Brakes worked fine from there. But your way might be simpler than removing the wheel, at least on the back.
 

retiredNH

Active Member
Region
USA
I didn’t do that John, just removed the wheel. Then I pulled the cotter pin, slid the old pads out with their spring and pushed the pistons in. Slid the new pads with spring in, inserted and bent the supplied new cotter pin. Reinstalled the wheel. Brakes worked fine from there. But your way might be simpler than removing the wheel, at least on the back.
The simplest method seems to be to remove the brake & while holding in hand with cable still attached, change pads, 2 bolts.
If you remove the caliper, don't you need to re-align it?
 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
If you remove the caliper, don't you need to re-align it?
Very interesting. I have been using a paint pen for six-months and have been using it more and more. I will try placing three dots around each bolt holding a caliper, precisely marking its original position to see if I can reinstall it using those guides. I may not need to adjust it then, saving ten minutes and cutting total job time in half.
Some brake pads can be lifted out from above, most require removing the caliper and pulling them from the inside. With hydraulics I would only pull them so that I can lever the piston open without damaging the rotors.
Hey, I just had an idea and it is a real thing! I checked. There are little paint pens that have UV paint. So you could mark the bolts and no one would be able to tell unless they had a UV light pen. You would be doing the job like a magician wizard.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Nevada City, CA & Paradise Valley, AZ
If you remove the caliper, don't you need to re-align it?
In my experience, yes. The dished washers in the caliper mounting bolt/washer sets and slightly over sized mounting holes allow adjustment in the X - Y directions as well as in what I believe pilots call roll. With this flexibility the brake pads can be adjusted to be parallel to their rotors. With the bolts a bit loose, the starting point is usually to pull the brake lever and tighten the mounting bolts. If the pads still rub I then do a combination of trueing the rotors and individually adjusting the upper and lower mounting bolts to eliminate rubbing. This can take a bit of time so I only remove a caliper as a last resort. I always try to clean and replace pads without messing with the caliper.
 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
In my experience, yes. The dished washers in the caliper mounting bolt/washer sets and slightly over sized mounting holes allow adjustment in the X - Y directions as well as in what I believe pilots call roll. With this flexibility the brake pads can be adjusted to be parallel to their rotors. With the bolts a bit loose, the starting point is usually to pull the brake lever and tighten the mounting bolts. If the pads still rub I then do a combination of trueing the rotors and individually adjusting the upper and lower mounting bolts to eliminate rubbing. This can take a bit of time so I only remove a caliper as a last resort. I always try to clean and replace pads without messing with the caliper.
I often use the rubber band method, freeing up one hand. With a rubber band pulling the lever at just under 1/2 of normal lever force, loosen the bolts, turn the wheel as you slowly tighten the bolts evenly. The caliper will automatically self-center. Nothing self-centered about it. Then true the rotor low on the rotor 'spokes' and not at the braking surface. A flashlight, bike light or piece of white paper will help when viewing which side is rubbing. If you do not have access to a disc truing tool you can in a pinch use a channel lock wrench.
 

Gionnirocket

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Y. O.
I often use the rubber band method, freeing up one hand. With a rubber band pulling the lever at just under 1/2 of normal lever force, loosen the bolts, turn the wheel as you slowly tighten the bolts evenly. The caliper will automatically self-center. Nothing self-centered about it. Then true the rotor low on the rotor 'spokes' and not at the braking surface. A flashlight, bike light or piece of white paper will help when viewing which side is rubbing. If you do not have access to a disc truing tool you can in a pinch use a channel lock wrench.
That's key!
To not squeeze the lever too hard... just enough to make contact is all that's needed and any more yields poor results.