Buying used Rad bike. would you?

Dennis Halligan

New Member
Help,
I live in Georgia and I’m interested in buying a rad bike. I’ve looked online and saw one I like on a resale sight. It is a 2018 rad mini. I went over to see bike and it is in nice condition , but the person who has it is older and hasn’t used it in a while. He said it had been 6 months since he used it. The battery would not charge. He took to bike shop and said they said battery was bad. My question to group is would you buy used Rad bike if price was right? could other things be wrong that I don’t know about. He would sell me bike for $500. A new battery is $550. So the savings from a new one with warranty is minimal. I’m thinking of buying my wife and myself new bikes with large wheels. Would it make since to have “extra “ bike? Thoughts?
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
How handy are you?

I would buy it because Rad Power bikes are so good for modifications.
The most common one is Bolton and Electro Bike World kit.

I would rather have a bike that's not working, and buy a new 52V battery and Bolton 35A kit.

Maybe offer $400 cash?
 

Dennis Halligan

New Member
How handy are you?

I would buy it because Rad Power bikes are so good for modifications.
The most common one is Bolton and Electro Bike World kit.

I would rather have a bike that's not working, and buy a new 52V battery and Bolton 35A kit.

Maybe offer $400 cash?
Thanks. I’m a recreational bike. the seller will not go lower. 2 biggest advantages of this type battery ?
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Thanks. I’m a recreational bike. the seller will not go lower. 2 biggest advantages of this type battery ?
You mean 52V battery?

More power, if that's important to you.

However it won't be bolt-on, you will need to change the battery cradle and maybe the connector as well.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
As the owner of a '17 Rad with a battery that's still going strong, I'm struggling with the idea that somebody managed to kill a 2 year old battery. My bet is there's something else wrong with it. Maybe a bad charger (cheap!), but there are fuses involved as well......

If I were interested in a Rad Mini, and there was one available locally, I'd pay 500 for it in a heartbeat.

Playing the worst case scenario, that it does need a battery, finding one to replace the OEM battery should be pretty easy - even if you have to replace the rack that holds the battery as part of the project. Most would find that an easy DIY project....
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
AHicks and I would pay $500 for a used radmini because we have the knowledge to fix what's wrong. If you have to pay a shop to get the bike running, or buy the OEM pack, not such a good deal.

Here's a thread on battery replacements.

If it were me, I'd buy a generic Hailong shark. It comes with a new cradle, so I wouldn't have to worry about having it fit. With brand name cells, about $440, Under $400 if you want to cheap it out with no name cells (do not cheap it out). Comes with charger.

 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
I was assuming basic DIY skills. There should be no rocket science required here.

+1 regarding the generic shark. No way on earth would I buy an OEM RAD. MUCH better value to be had with just a little shopping.
 

TMH

Well-Known Member
...So the savings from a new one with warranty is minimal.
Depending on how much you want to work to source and potentially have to fit a non-OEM battery, and your lack of knowledge about the bike's history (was owner having other problems not related to the bad battery?), it seems like you have answered your own question.

Having an extra bike, just to ride something different when you want or for a visiting friend or family member is awesome. But if it were me, I would just look at a less expensive 'standard' bike instead of a small tire folding bike. Something like the new Ride1Up Core-5 comes to mind, but there are plenty of options.

https://ride1up.com/product/core-5/
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
AHicks and I would pay $500 for a used radmini because we have the knowledge to fix what's wrong. If you have to pay a shop to get the bike running, or buy the OEM pack, not such a good deal.

Here's a thread on battery replacements.

If it were me, I'd buy a generic Hailong shark. It comes with a new cradle, so I wouldn't have to worry about having it fit. With brand name cells, about $440, Under $400 if you want to cheap it out with no name cells (do not cheap it out). Comes with charger.

I agree with Hailong casing but I'd get one from AliExpress. eBay is a little more expensive.
 

Radycle

New Member
Dennis - I agree with AHicks that there is probably something else wrong. I wouldn't hesitate to pay 500, though, and troubleshoot the thing.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
well if it's a fuse or some kind of easy fix as AHicks suggested, then $500 would be a heck of a great deal.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
A gamble for sure, but I think it's a pretty safe one. Especially considering a bike used/stored in Georgia.
 

ExPatBrit

Member
I purchased my 2019 Rover used, it was $1K with less than 100 miles on it. Awesome deal. E-bikes are often impulse purchases, so I took advantage of previous buyer remorse. Nowadays with the lack of new bikes I see no used RAD bikes for sale.

The bike has been great have about 1500 miles on it. Installed the Bolton mod and I am still ahead financially.

These are simple machines, I would buy that mini.

My guess is the battery was left fully discharged for a long time, that will kill it. No offence to your bike shop, but they generally don't understand e-bikes electronics at a higher level.

There are companies that refurb batteries.


RAD (and pretty much every other vendor of $1-2K bikes) is out of stock on most of their bikes until Q3 , RAD batteries are out of stock as well.
 

KenS

Member
Here is my analysis of the situation.

How much do you like that bike? Would you buy that bike if you only had $1500 to buy a single bike? And no used bikes were available.

I agree with previous posters that the bike would be a pretty good deal even if you had to buy another battery (and I would assume the worst case that you will need to buy a new battery).

But what is going to happen with this bike if it is not the bike you want. It will get ridden a few times and then be stuffed in a corner in your garage.

Buy the bike that you want to ride. Don't buy the bike that you might ride until you get the bike that you want.

You are talking about a small amount of difference here: $1000 (for OK --maybe-- ) vs $1500 (for what you want). We are not talking about Riese & Muller levels of prices.

In addition, the $1500 will buy you support for all the other parts of the bike that you couldn't test because the battery is dead.

Good luck with your choice.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Yes, agree. If this bike isn't already pretty high on your list/checking a lot of your boxes, buying it because it's a "good deal" may not work out in your best interest. Further, if it does require a new battery, from resale stand point, you would do well just to get out from under it - without loosing a lot of money.
 

jaizon

Active Member
If it's too good to be true... :cool:

Don't assume because he's old(er) he doesn't know what he's doing or how much is really wrong.

Just a pinch of caution.

Could be the Big Rock Candy mountain.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
It would be if I were interested in a Mini !

I would NOT however, buy it because it was a "good deal", rather than not exactly what I was looking for.

Difference beteen the good deal and the bike I really wanted, when spread out over the life of the bike, not worth it here.
 

KenS

Member
I agree with AHicks on this issue. You might check it out and see if it is as good a deal as it sounds. You might be thinking of people who might enjoy this type of bike. You may alert them if this is a good deal. You could even buy it as a gift for one of those people. But don't buy a bike because it is a good deal and then stuff it into the back of your garage.