C380+ vs Medeo T10+ vs Allant+ 9.9s+ vs ?

TrevorB

Active Member
I can just do 45kmhr with 40t chainring spinning fast, 44t would be better for short periods, 48t for extended periods. 46t on back with 40t chainring and 65nm motor will climb hills where I'm are working to keep front wheel on ground. Not type hill you are likely to find on a road. A 85nm motor would give equivalent of another low gear in climbing ability.
Commuting I'm currently getting 3-3500kms from 11spd chain to 0.75 wear mark, will run the whole drivetrain into ground on 2nd chain so expect at least 4000kms before any issues. Then it will be a whole new drive train, chainring, cassette, idlers and chain.
Because my bike is 32kmhr bike tend to run in 2nd or 3rd gear most of time on flat, both those gears can be replaced individually extending life of cassette.
 

fooferdoggie

Well-Known Member
I got 12,000 miles on my other bosch powered bike with a 10 speed chain. something like 7 to 9 chains before the last one caused issues and I replace the whole drivetrain.
 

abird4

New Member
Region
USA
I went to the REI in Greenville SC and rode the Cannondale Tesoro Neo X2 in M. It was a size too small. I think it likely that the L would fit well. It would open up gravel/dirt with the slacker gemoetry, wider tires, but probably less optimal for pavement. Fork has no lockout. Rear hub feels a little sloppy with fewer points of engagement than I am used to. I could order a L sight unseen, ready in 10 days, but I would potentially give up the "birds in the hand." Allant 9.9s is probably the bike I feel most solid about at this point. Available at LBS. Pricier by a fair margin. I'm not going to make price the deciding factor, but I can't say it's not a factor. Not sure about Cobi--I see some unsatisfied custoners. Allant 8s pretty close, spec-wise, but heavier, and the only way I can get one is to drive to Atlanta 3+ hours away. LBS offered $350 discount on 9.9S so now there is a $1500 difference vs the 8S. Finally, I can ride the Medeo T10+ in M on Sat (and maybe even Thurs, if scheduling works out). My gut is that I will end up with Allant+ or Medeo, and I will decide within the next few days. Your comments are much appreciated as always!
 

Johnny

Well-Known Member
I went to the REI in Greenville SC and rode the Cannondale Tesoro Neo X2 in M. It was a size too small. I think it likely that the L would fit well. It would open up gravel/dirt with the slacker gemoetry, wider tires, but probably less optimal for pavement. Fork has no lockout. Rear hub feels a little sloppy with fewer points of engagement than I am used to. I could order a L sight unseen, ready in 10 days, but I would potentially give up the "birds in the hand." Allant 9.9s is probably the bike I feel most solid about at this point. Available at LBS. Pricier by a fair margin. I'm not going to make price the deciding factor, but I can't say it's not a factor. Not sure about Cobi--I see some unsatisfied custoners. Allant 8s pretty close, spec-wise, but heavier, and the only way I can get one is to drive to Atlanta 3+ hours away. LBS offered $350 discount on 9.9S so now there is a $1500 difference vs the 8S. Finally, I can ride the Medeo T10+ in M on Sat (and maybe even Thurs, if scheduling works out). My gut is that I will end up with Allant+ or Medeo, and I will decide within the next few days. Your comments are much appreciated as always!

The tires of Neo is actually better for pavement, wheels are 29ers and tires are G-Ones(they are pretty fast rolling tires, just increase the pressure) so they will roll and hold speed quite a bit better than allant which has 27.5x2.4 ers. Yeah the fork is not the best but still it should help on bad pavement moreover it comes with a tapered headset so in the future you can switch to a pretty good fork.

9.9s is way overpriced for what it is, also it can not take a suspension fork last time I checked and those 27.5ers are not the best when it comes to rolling resistance. It has an ok mspline $90 hub if you really feel that slightly faster engagement is essential you can get the rear wheel of any bike that you choose rebuilt with one of those hubs. Btw all of these bikes are similar in weight, geometry and have the same motor so they will be the same in terms of speed.

You should also try Vado's.


Maybe you should give more details on what you need so that people can give you better suggestions.
 
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abird4

New Member
Region
USA
The tires of Neo is actually better for pavement, wheels are 29ers and tires are G-Ones(they are pretty fast rolling tires, just increase the pressure) so they will roll and hold speed quite a bit better than allant which has 27.5x2.4 ers. Yeah the fork is not the best but still it should help on bad pavement moreover it comes with a tapered headset so in the future you can switch to a pretty good fork.

9.9s is way overpriced for what it is, also it can not take a suspension fork last time I checked and those 27.5ers are not the best when it comes to rolling resistance. It has an ok mspline $90 hub if you really feel that slightly faster engagement is essential you can get the rear wheel of any bike that you choose rebuilt with one of those hubs. Btw all of these bikes are similar in weight, geometry and have the same motor so they will be the same in terms of speed.

You should also try Vado's.


Maybe you should give more details on what you need so that people can give you better suggestions.
Thanks, that is helpful. My primary intention is to ride on paved roads with significant long climbs, and to possibly tour at some point. Some gravel/dirt capability could be cool but not essential by any means. For singletrack, my favorite trails prohibit e bikes, and I already have a great dual-suspension mtb (29er, which I do appreciate for the climbs). Vado could be a possibility--I would appreciate the 710Wh battery, but the fact that dual battery setup is not possible is a minus.
 

Johnny

Well-Known Member
Thanks, that is helpful. My primary intention is to ride on paved roads with significant long climbs, and to possibly tour at some point. Some gravel/dirt capability could be cool but not essential by any means. For singletrack, my favorite trails prohibit e bikes, and I already have a great dual-suspension mtb (29er, which I do appreciate for the climbs). Vado could be a possibility--I would appreciate the 710Wh battery, but the fact that dual battery setup is not possible is a minus.
Thanks for the clarification. Here is my two cents.

Since you mention tour I always like the flexibility to ride on different terrain while touring so I like suspension. When you have the assist the loss because of suspension is not significant but added comfort is nice. Ebikes are different animals, I wouldn't wanna go for suspension on my regular bike if I ride it only on pavement however for a touring ebike I would always favor fs especially with 29ers.

Putting that aside, how much power would you like to put in yourself? For example what is the length and average grade of your climbs? While I would like the wide range cassette for such climbs I don't really need a lot of gears or a top of the line derailleur.

Speed is also a big factor, these motors are very power hungry for sustained high speeds but if you like to staying around or below 20 mph on average they are great.

Dual battery setup is definitely nice especially for commuting. On the other hand I think for touring carrying a second battery is not a bad option.

I think you should take an ebike for a long ride if possible to see how you like the range the way you ride.


Unfortunately a good portion of the trails I like to ride also prohibits ebikes.

Good luck.
 

abird4

New Member
Region
USA
Thanks for the clarification. Here is my two cents.

Since you mention tour I always like the flexibility to ride on different terrain while touring so I like suspension. When you have the assist the loss because of suspension is not significant but added comfort is nice. Ebikes are different animals, I wouldn't wanna go for suspension on my regular bike if I ride it only on pavement however for a touring ebike I would always favor fs especially with 29ers.

Putting that aside, how much power would you like to put in yourself? For example what is the length and average grade of your climbs? While I would like the wide range cassette for such climbs I don't really need a lot of gears or a top of the line derailleur.

Speed is also a big factor, these motors are very power hungry for sustained high speeds but if you like to staying around or below 20 mph on average they are great.

Dual battery setup is definitely nice especially for commuting. On the other hand I think for touring carrying a second battery is not a bad option.

I think you should take an ebike for a long ride if possible to see how you like the range the way you ride.


Unfortunately a good portion of the trails I like to ride also prohibits ebikes.

Good luck.
I want to ride on the blue ridge parkway, about 7mi from my house. From what I am reading, climbs are generally less than 8% grade. However I am in one of the lowest valleys, and riding north involves a 13 mile climb. I am used to riding at my limit on non-powered climbs. I'd love to ride somewhat below my limit with an ebike.

You've got me thinking more about the Tesoro Neo X2 in L, less about the Treks, and just as much about the Medeo T10+.
 

hoss7678

New Member
Region
USA
I think Gazlle Ultimate C10 looks like a great bike i am shopping myself not what the max weight load is?
 

abird4

New Member
Region
USA
I think Gazlle Ultimate C10 looks like a great bike i am shopping myself not what the max weight load is?
I read 300lbs in the forum somewhere but I'm having trouble pinning this down definitvely.. The bike is built like a tank.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
common issue? should I be thinking about different wheels/tighter spoke pattern?
I mean, an e-bike can be built like a tank but spokes are just spokes. A strong e-bike might take far more than 300 lb altogether but the major issue heavy riders do experience are spokes snapping. "If it ain't broke, don't fix it".
 

abird4

New Member
Region
USA
I mean, an e-bike can be built like a tank but spokes are just spokes. A strong e-bike might take far more than 300 lb altogether but the major issue heavy riders do experience are spokes snapping. "If it ain't broke, don't fix it".
I might think about fixing it before it breaks, if I end up loading up the bike and going on a multiday tour...
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
I might think about fixing it before it breaks, if I end up loading up the bike and going on a multiday tour...
Ya, but you would certainly ride your new e-bike for at least several weeks before you go on a long tour?
Any bike or e-bike delivered by a good brand requires so-called "obligatory first servicing" to hold the warranty valid. You do such a service after having ridden the bike for 100-200 miles (or within 6 months post the purchase). If anything shall break, it would break first in that initial period.
 

TrevorB

Active Member
I might think about fixing it before it breaks, if I end up loading up the bike and going on a multiday tour

I might think about fixing it before it breaks, if I end up loading up the bike and going on a multiday tour...
Gazelle have been making quality ebikes for few years now, I'd be surprised if their wheels aren't build to handle extra stresses.

I do recommend having shop check rear wheel every year.
 

Rossterman

New Member
Region
USA
That is helpful, thanks. Yeah, I am now leaning toward chain again...from what I can gather it looks a whole lot easier to tinker with the gear ratios if that was ever needed. The klunk was subtle but a little irritating.
Hmm, I have the medeo t10+ and no clunk. Wondering if somethings loose in the motor drive? As to the rear sprocket, I find the range of gear perfectly suited for me (65 year old). Maybe a younger person wouldn’t care for that much low gear but works perfectly for me. Also bike is super quiet just a satisfying snick into the next gear. Lack of rolling resistance is amazing compared to friend’s bikes as I swear it easily coasts for miles on even a 1% slight downhill while others are pedaling. All in all an amazing bike!
 
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