Cadence sensor riding experience

Padrepedro

Member
Region
USA
My understanding from the forum is that cadence sensors are like "on/off" switches. I'm wondering how that affects your ability to ride with someone else who is not riding an ebike. I want to buy an ebike for my girlfriend, but I want to be able to ride together. For example, when I'm doing a long climb at only 3-5 mph (I don't want her to blow by me and wait for me at the top of the hill).

Ride1Up seems to have many assist levels, which are programmable too, so I'm thinking this should be up to the task. Can anyone with this or similar bike provide feedback? Ideally, I would get a bike with torque sensor, but if the cadence sensor bikes are "good enough", I'll go with the less expensive bike.

Thanks!!
 

Dewey

Well-Known Member
Yes, the cadence sensor is an on/off switch, a torque sensor feels your pedal effort and delivers power incrementally, in both cases the motor has a power band it wants to get into and on the flat you will feel it pulling you up to the speed it is most happy at the PAS level you selected. Riding up hill you just feel the motor torque helping while you pedal up the hill.

The amount of assist you get from the motor depends on a combination of the motor wattage, controller amperage, battery voltage, and the PAS level you select. Typically budget Ebikes have 250w hub motors with 36v batteries and controllers set to between 10-15A so you can expect to get roughly 350-540w of peak power assistance In the highest pedal assist level. If you’re in a hilly area I recommend getting a 500w motor, 48v battery, system that will deliver more power.
 
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Mike_V

Active Member
Does she ride a bike, Pedro, or is this your idea?
Consider buying one you really like in case it becomes neglected.
Mike
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Northeast Pennsylvania
when I'm doing a long climb at only 3-5 mph (I don't want her to blow by me and wait for me at the top of the hill).

This same scenario happens whenever you are riding in a group with different bikes. Matching your speed with others is often difficult with all the different PAS / assist / speed levels available. Buying a bike with many programmable speed / assist levels would definitely be a help but you may still have trouble syncing speeds.

Another solution, which works well for me, is to get a class 2 or class 3 bike with a twist throttle. Using one of the many available cruise control devices, you can set the bike to any speed you like. Then apply as much or as little pedal assist as you choose. That way, you are assisting the bike rather than it assisting you. This works at very slow speeds which is often difficult to achieve with most cadence or torque based systems. It is also a more efficient way to ride and can provide a significant range increase.
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
A combination of her cadence and assist level will make for a wide pattern of bicycle speed. But, leg strength still plays into riding together. If you slow to a point, there is no guarantee she won’t stall out. Not all hub motors have the torque to increase speed on a steep grade.
 

Padrepedro

Member
Region
USA
Does she ride a bike, Pedro, or is this your idea?
Consider buying one you really like in case it becomes neglected.
Mike
She likes to ride, but she feels it is too hard to keep up with me, especially when going up hills. I'm hoping with her on an ebike we can both get a good workout together without her getting too tired.
 

Padrepedro

Member
Region
USA
Another solution, which works well for me, is to get a class 2 or class 3 bike with a twist throttle. Using one of the many available cruise control devices, you can set the bike to any speed you like. Then apply as much or as little pedal assist as you choose. That way, you are assisting the bike rather than it assisting you. This works at very slow speeds which is often difficult to achieve with most cadence or torque based systems. It is also a more efficient way to ride and can provide a significant range increase.
Which bikes have twist throttle? All the ones I've seen are push button throttle. Are these bikes with cadense sensors?
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Northeast Pennsylvania
Which bikes have twist throttle? All the ones I've seen are push button throttle. Are these bikes with cadense sensors?
This site lists a few but there are many others:


I have Pedego bikes with twist throttles but they are all in the $3K price range.


Take a took at Rad. They have several twist throttle models:


You can also replace a thumb throttle with a twist type on many bikes.
 
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J.R.

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Which bikes have twist throttle? All the ones I've seen are push button throttle. Are these bikes with cadense sensors?
Sorry if you mentioned this, but are you in the US? I ask because some countries don't allow throttles. If you're in the US, or anywhere in North America really, you shouldn't have a problem finding an ebike with a throttle. Some are half grip twist throttle and some are thumb throttle. Both apply power in the same way.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Northeast Pennsylvania
Sorry if you mentioned this, but are you in the US? I ask because some countries don't allow throttles. If you're in the US, or anywhere in North America really, you shouldn't have a problem finding an ebike with a throttle. Some are half grip twist throttle and some are thumb throttle. Both apply power in the same way.
Both good points.

Fatigue sets in after trying to hold a fixed speed for any length of time with either a twist or thumb throttle. Cruise control devices are common for the twist type but not so for the thumb. Some bikes have a built in cruise control device in which case the type of throttle makes no difference.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Been riding with my wife and others for about 5 years now. My experience is that you don't need to remain side by side 100% of the entire ride to enjoy riding with somebody. Don't worry about her staying right next to you on a long hill. Once the hill is topped you can easily draw up along side each other to maintain your conversation. You're overthinking this in my opinion. -Al
 

GenXrider

Well-Known Member
Ride1Up seems to have many assist levels, which are programmable too, so I'm thinking this should be up to the task. Can anyone with this or similar bike provide feedback? Ideally, I would get a bike with torque sensor, but if the cadence sensor bikes are "good enough", I'll go with the less expensive bike.

Thanks!!
On the current generation Ride1Up 500, 700, and Core-5, the cadence PAS system has configurable power settings for each assist level. However, the Ride1Up LMTD is a torque sensor bike and does not have a cadence sensor. Some people have returned the bike because they prefer the cadence sensor experience. This configurability is a great feature of the Ride1Up cadence sensor bikes as many e-bikes with cadence sensors accelerate too quickly and to too high of a speed in the lowest assist level with no way to adjust it. I like the Ride1Up granular control so it's not just like an on/off switch. You can get just the amount of power you want.

 
T

Terry777

Guest
Been riding with my wife and others for about 5 years now. My experience is that you don't need to remain side by side 100% of the entire ride to enjoy riding with somebody. Don't worry about her staying right next to you on a long hill. Once the hill is topped you can easily draw up along side each other to maintain your conversation. You're overthinking this in my opinion. -Al
I agree totally.
You can chug along slowly on a fast bike or you can ring a slow ones bell however much you feel like and it all depends how much speed you have it all set up for. Fast or slow, easy.
I have a 1000w Ultra and when set to ECO pas 1 I can ride with people on non electric bikes very easily. Set to SPORT pas 5 and I’m outta there 1500w sharpish! I can also steady away at everything in between both settings very easily. So long as both bikes are somewhat similar you’ll be fine. Most have a decent range of speed and assist settings.
 

Lightning P38

Active Member
My understanding from the forum is that cadence sensors are like "on/off" switches. I'm wondering how that affects your ability to ride with someone else who is not riding an ebike. I want to buy an ebike for my girlfriend, but I want to be able to ride together. For example, when I'm doing a long climb at only 3-5 mph (I don't want her to blow by me and wait for me at the top of the hill).

Ride1Up seems to have many assist levels, which are programmable too, so I'm thinking this should be up to the task. Can anyone with this or similar bike provide feedback? Ideally, I would get a bike with torque sensor, but if the cadence sensor bikes are "good enough", I'll go with the less expensive bike.

Thanks!!
I have about 600 miles on my bike with an e-assist kit installed, with a cadence sensor. I have 5 assist levels. My riding partner rides at 10 - 11 mph with no e-assist. I have no trouble matching her speed riding side by side. If I get ahead of her, I just coast for a bit. Or I drop the assist one level and pedal a bit harder.
As far as hills, I just drop my assist level so she can keep up with me, at 5 mph....saves my battery by not blasting up hills.

i have no trouble matching speeds with slower or faster riders....I just adjust the assist level.

The only time I use the throttle is when I unclip both feet at slow speeds going through gates, etc., which is handy on a recumbent bike.

Good, better, or best? I rate the cadence system as Better......and from what I have read, torque sensor as best.
I have not ridden a torque sensor bike, so I don’t know what I am missing!
 

ned37

New Member
my wife's ride1up core5 has a thumb throttle that works even if in pas0, which gives her the option to have control over her speed when riding with another ebike
 

Padrepedro

Member
Region
USA
Thanks for everyone's input. I purchased Ride1Up 500 last night. I think with 9 levels of programmable assist, it should do the job. Now I just need to study the assembly instructions and buy some torque wrenches before it arrives.
 

Padrepedro

Member
Region
USA
Sorry if you mentioned this, but are you in the US? I ask because some countries don't allow throttles. If you're in the US, or anywhere in North America really, you shouldn't have a problem finding an ebike with a throttle. Some are half grip twist throttle and some are thumb throttle. Both apply power in the same way.
I'm in California. I wouldn't expect her to use throttle that much since we're trying to get a good workout, so PAS should be the primary usage. But it is still nice to have a throttle available whenever needed.
 

PatriciaK

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Pacific Northwest and Piedmont Triad
My situation is reversed - I'm the one with the e-bike (Giant La Free E+2), and husband rides a traditional bike. I ALWAYS have to wait for him at the top of the hill 🤣!
I use those moments to stop and enjoy the scenery, and be grateful for the new cycling life my FABulous bike has enabled 😉!