Camping fail-

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
If you take that much stuff, you are doing it wrong. Extremely wrong.

This guy's list at: http://bicycletouringpro.com/lightweight-bike-touring-setup/ is a good starting point if you are going for an overnighter.

Another rule of thumb. Unless you are touring in a very remote area, you should never carry more than 1 breakfast, 1 lunch, and 1 dinner. And most of the time you won't need to carry that -- and if you don't need to carry it, do not carry it.
 

Barkme Wolf

Active Member
If you take that much stuff, you are doing it wrong. Extremely wrong.

This guy's list at: http://bicycletouringpro.com/lightweight-bike-touring-setup/ is a good starting point if you are going for an overnighter.

Another rule of thumb. Unless you are touring in a very remote area, you should never carry more than 1 breakfast, 1 lunch, and 1 dinner. And most of the time you won't need to carry that -- and if you don't need to carry it, do not carry it.
It looks like more than it is. The ukulele bulked it up. less than 40 lbs.
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
Even with the spare battery and the ukulele, you should be able to get away with half that much weight.

I've gone on ten-day backpack trips in the North Cascades, BC Coast Range, and the Wind Rivers on a smidgen over 30lbs, of which almost 20lbs was groceries. And I had a flask of Glenlivet, an iPod, and a satellite phone.

Bluntly, you will have a much more enjoyable trip if you take less stuff. Everything you take with you on a bike trip you are purchasing by the pound and paying for by the mile.
 

raymann112

Member
Even with the spare battery and the ukulele, you should be able to get away with half that much weight.

I've gone on ten-day backpack trips in the North Cascades, BC Coast Range, and the Wind Rivers on a smidgen over 30lbs, of which almost 20lbs was groceries. And I had a flask of Glenlivet, an iPod, and a satellite phone.

Bluntly, you will have a much more enjoyable trip if you take less stuff. Everything you take with you on a bike trip you are purchasing by the pound and paying for by the mile.
see that's the thing, he's not hauling the stuff by back but by a bike that can handle it, same as I intend to. I've done several 7 day trips carrying around 60 lbs. But I didn't have to hike that far or change camp more then 3 times. And my camp sites are awesome! Brought more then a flask!

but 20 lbs of food? I just brought Mountain House pouches and even a week of those was like 5 lbs, if that.
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
2 lbs per person per day is pretty good rule of thumb for backpacking/climbing trips in moderate weather. In warmer climates you might adjust that down to 1,5 lbs per person per day. But if you are on a glacier in Alaska in March it is probably 3 or even more pounds per person per day.

An important rule of thumb for menu planning is that half of your per-day food weight should be "lunch".

The point is that even on a bike, carrying that extra weight means you cannot ride as far or as fast and will not have as much fun. Yes, you can carry 50 or 60 pounds on a touring bike. It will handle like a pig and you will suffer up every hill. And if you have an e-bike that extra weight will translate into a shorter range. So you will either do much more pedaling of the already heavier electric bike, or you will be stopping frequently to charge batteries. Better to carry less and have more fun.

I have done long bike tours on the Oregon, Washington, and California (north of Slobispo) coasts, and one memorable trip from Portland to Burning Man and back. Everything you take is bought by the pound and paid for by the mile.
 

Barkme Wolf

Active Member
2 lbs per person per day is pretty good rule of thumb for backpacking/climbing trips in moderate weather. In warmer climates you might adjust that down to 1,5 lbs per person per day. But if you are on a glacier in Alaska in March it is probably 3 or even more pounds per person per day.

An important rule of thumb for menu planning is that half of your per-day food weight should be "lunch".

The point is that even on a bike, carrying that extra weight means you cannot ride as far or as fast and will not have as much fun. Yes, you can carry 50 or 60 pounds on a touring bike. It will handle like a pig and you will suffer up every hill. And if you have an e-bike that extra weight will translate into a shorter range. So you will either do much more pedaling of the already heavier electric bike, or you will be stopping frequently to charge batteries. Better to carry less and have more fun.

I have done long bike tours on the Oregon, Washington, and California (north of Slobispo) coasts, and one memorable trip from Portland to Burning Man and back. Everything you take is bought by the pound and paid for by the mile.
I have no complaints about what I had. I could easily carry much, much more. I had plenty of fun until my bald tire blew. I have loaded this bike with more.

If you like to rough it, cool. I am a 47 year old and when I go camping I choose to be comfortable. I am riding less than 30 miles so it really is NO BIG THING.
Thanks though, it is great advice. I have watched hundreds of videos about stealth and bike camping. I plan to get a smaller stove but other than that I am very comfortable with this set up.
 

Barkme Wolf

Active Member
see that's the thing, he's not hauling the stuff by back but by a bike that can handle it, same as I intend to. I've done several 7 day trips carrying around 60 lbs. But I didn't have to hike that far or change camp more then 3 times. And my camp sites are awesome! Brought more then a flask!

but 20 lbs of food? I just brought Mountain House pouches and even a week of those was like 5 lbs, if that.
I don't carry hardly any food. Just coffee mostly and a few snacks. I have some high protein stuff stashed in case of a situation but in general I am not a big eater.