Camping on my E-Bike

motostrano

Active Member
That sure is a lot of stuff. I took a backpacking class recently that did a great job teaching to me leave all the "just in case" stuff behind, pack less and enjoy the trip without so much stuff! Here's my most recent rig for ebike camping. I'm able to get way out in the sticks with the Felt Outfitter either on fire roads or single track bike trails and get to some really nice secluded fishing/swimming spots that most bikes can't get to. This was 10 miles in at Henry Coe State Park recently:

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Barkme Wolf

Active Member
That sure is a lot of stuff. I took a backpacking class recently that did a great job teaching to me leave all the "just in case" stuff behind, pack less and enjoy the trip without so much stuff! Here's my most recent rig for ebike camping. I'm able to get way out in the sticks with the Felt Outfitter either on fire roads or single track bike trails and get to some really nice secluded fishing/swimming spots that most bikes can't get to. This was 10 miles in at Henry Coe State Park recently:

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About the same amount of stuff as I have. Except no ukulele.
 

Barkme Wolf

Active Member
Thank you all for the advice but as I have stated- I am very happy with the amount of gear I am bringing and "chose" it all specifically for what I want when I am camping.
I was raised in the woods and farm lands of WI. I know how to camp.
I have-
A light sleeping bag
A bivy (small tent)
A Sleeping pad (Big, comfortable, self inflating) -1 point
Small eating set up (Cup, plate, silverware)
A tarp
Collapsible lantern/flashlight/solar charger
Water bottle(purifier)
Snacks
Change of cloths
Med Kit
French Press (Essential!)
My stove is way too big -5 points
and
My Ukulele (Essential)

I don't think I will be leaving any of it behind but as I stated in the video, I will be getting a new compact stove.
Likely the Pocket Rocket- Rated #2 by EzVid WIKI
 

mrgold35

Well-Known Member
I once saw this cool looking BioLite camp stove that also generates electricity, $130: https://www.bioliteenergy.com/products/campstove-2

Might be a nice back-up if you run out of fuel, run USB camp lights, recharge Garmin GPS/smartphone, and top off ebike battery during the night.

biolite II.jpg
 

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raymann112

Member
While I vary it greatly depending on where I'm going, what time of year, and how long I'm staying out; I generally bring this:

Small two person tent
LuxuryLite cot
Insulated camping quilt (I hate sleeping bags)
Jetboil (with collapsable bowl/utensils, seasonings, and dehydrated meals)
Katadyn Pocket with water prufication tablets
Two water bottles
flask...not empty :)
Undies, socks, maybe change in shirt
light jacket most of the time
collapsable chair
small shovel
med kit/deet
fire kit
coffee/press
gps, ebook reader
handgun
+ a few trip specific odds and ends
 

Larry Ganz

Active Member
@Barkme Wolf - Our family have the Pocket Rocket stoves and like them. We also have a couple of 25 year old Scorpion that still work well but have a hose between stove and gas, so not as convenient although quite small.
 

Sonoboy

Active Member
How do you rate the LuxuryLite cot? I'm tired of sleeping on noisy air mattresses and closed cell pads.
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
@Barkme Wolf - Our family have the Pocket Rocket stoves and like them. We also have a couple of 25 year old Scorpion that still work well but have a hose between stove and gas, so not as convenient although quite small.

Canister stoves are awesome, especially if you are in the boil-water-and-stir school of outdoor cooking.

There are lots of great models out there. I like the ones with a sparker so you don't need to keep track of a lighter or matches.

I've had this little monster for sixteen years (the stove, not the canister):

snow-peak.jpg
 

raymann112

Member
How do you rate the LuxuryLite cot? I'm tired of sleeping on noisy air mattresses and closed cell pads.

It's very compact but it does take a few minutes to put together and take down. Its also very firm, necessary because it's held up by the tension of the rods but there are no pressure points like on a pad. I have a very large self inflating pad thats comfortable but very impractical for backpacking...this is more comfortable although if you're used to an air mattress it really isn't the same.

I also like that the 'feet' are round, they won't tear into the base of your tent like other cots