Can a conventional mountain handle conversion kits

rcooch

New Member
Region
USA
Sure, I looked at some pics. It should be a good candidate for a Bafang BBS02. If you want the security of a front disk brake, you'll have to replace the fork with one that has the tabs. It's probably a a 1" threaded fork. Any 1" fork, threaded or threadless, with tabs is hard to find these days. EIther, there is a surge in DIY conversions of old bikes, or the supply chain just dried up.

I converted a 1992 Trek (rear motor) seven years ago, and 1" threaded suspensions forks were easy to find,. I further had to convert to threadless, but the steerer was long enough to do so. Now those forks are out of stock everywhere, By the way, even I upgraded to a wheel that could take disk brakes, I thought the Trek. upgraded to v-brakes, had plenty of stopping power. I did put a disk brake up front on my BBS02 conversion later, but the main difference is that it's harder to keep in adjustment.
That one is a 98 mine is a 94 basically the same
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
I think his opinion is in the hopes that I would buy a bike from him I think that’s why they steer you away from the conversions
Okay well, there you go, there's a conflict of interest.
You're asking an ebike sales person whether or not you should go for conversion route.
Obviously he's going to say no.
 

TNC

Member
Region
USA
As many have pointed out there are a ton of variables for candidate bikes for mid-drive conversions. There is also the issue of what the bike is to be used for. Recreational pedaling on smooth ground doesn't require an especially burly bike, but even there it helps a good bit for certain components on the bike...especially drivetrain and wheels. Now, for actual mountain biking...not just dirt bike paths...the bike had better be a decently built frame with very solid components.

Even as an older guy myself, I absolutely pound my Santa Cruz Nomad/BBSHD in rough terrain. My Nomad weighs about 50 pounds without the battery...I use a backpack setup. So far I notice the rear wheel takes a serious beating, requiring more attention to spoke tension. I have broken one good quality rear derailleur...clutch failure. I use an XT rear hub with a solid bolt axle with track nuts. The cassette body is steel, most aluminum cassette bodies should be avoided. And if your bike is full suspension, I highly recommend all-mountain, enduro, or DH level models for pivot and suspension component durability. I even run a dual crown fork on mine. Strong, quality hydraulic disc brakes are a must. Again, this is all for serious mountain biking in rougher terrain.
IMG_20210828_184419682.jpg
 

rcooch

New Member
Region
USA
As many have pointed out there are a ton of variables for candidate bikes for mid-drive conversions. There is also the issue of what the bike is to be used for. Recreational pedaling on smooth ground doesn't require an especially burly bike, but even there it helps a good bit for certain components on the bike...especially drivetrain and wheels. Now, for actual mountain biking...not just dirt bike paths...the bike had better be a decently built frame with very solid components.

Even as an older guy myself, I absolutely pound my Santa Cruz Nomad/BBSHD in rough terrain. My Nomad weighs about 50 pounds without the battery...I use a backpack setup. So far I notice the rear wheel takes a serious beating, requiring more attention to spoke tension. I have broken one good quality rear derailleur...clutch failure. I use an XT rear hub with a solid bolt axle with track nuts. The cassette body is steel, most aluminum cassette bodies should be avoided. And if your bike is full suspension, I highly recommend all-mountain, enduro, or DH level models for pivot and suspension component durability. I even run a dual crown fork on mine. Strong, quality hydraulic disc brakes are a must. Again, this is all for serious mountain biking in rougher terrain.View attachment 101393 I’m more the casual rider that would like to go off road now and then but not too rugged terrain like some wooded trails etc. etc.