Canada: $600 penalty for not having insurance

antboy

Well-Known Member
Earlier in this tread someone stated that you could be ticket if on an ebike going over 32kph and not pedaling. I was just bringing to light that that makes no sense.

I'd agree with that. The wording in the post suggested to me that e-bikes weren't allowed to go over 32kph under any circumstances, so I just wanted to clarify the point.

I also agree with the speed limit example. Here in Toronto, the Martin Goodman is limited to 20kph. The one group that regularly breaks this is not e-bikers, but the guys in clown suits who think they're in the Tour de France. :)
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Well, I don't know about Canada, but with the incredible amount of obesity we have in the US including children, yes, it would be a good idea for kids who are otherwise healthy to actually get some exercise. Funny, people have no problems talking about how bad smoking is and calling out people who smoke because of it's cost to society, but suddenly it is "fat shaming" to tell someone to exercise, even though the cost to public health (which we all pay for) of obesity could easily exceed that of smoking. And no, it's not genetics or something most people can't help. The average weight of American males has gone from 160 pounds in the 1960's to 200 pounds today. It's more likely caused by tons of junk food and sitting around all day playing video games. I use to see kids biking all the time, now it's a rare sight. But seeing fat kids is so common now that people take it as being "normal".
Very interesting analogy.

Smoking cause cancer, obesity cause heart attack. They both cause serious life threatening consequences and high medical cost.. and both preventable.

I agree that public has less problem telling smokers to stop smoking and labeling them as irresponsible or have low self control.
On the other hand, people would less likely be telling over weight people to stop eating so much and label them as irresponsible.
If you ever tell somebody, or talk about someone who is overweight, most people will tell you to mind your own business and stop body shaming or judge someone by their appearances.
 
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Feliz

Well-Known Member
In my experience most obese people would like you to believe it's caused from a medical condition. The ones I know, including relatives, just plain eat or/and drink too much.
 

Captain Slow

Well-Known Member
So are you suggesting that young people should just ride normal bicycle?
If so, this kind of notion is exactly why many people think ebikes = assistive device for elderly people.

I see no problem younger people riding ebikes, it's fun, cheap and healthy. Perfect for students and less polluting than driving a car or motorcycle.

The post immediately before the one you quoted I said with how powerful ebikes are these days he just needs to pedal a little bit i.e. an electric bike where one has to pedal and not the scooter he's riding. The policeman was only giving tickets those those on the scooters with pedals that are impractical to use.

So no, I wasn't suggesting everyone ride a regular bicycle. I know a lot of people can't or don't want to.
 

sl_duck

Member
As much as I would like to see those scooter-style bikes and their legal-dodge pedals driven from the streets, I don't think the traffic cop is interpreting the legislation correctly. The key word is the "or" in (2)(b). As long as one of those three requirements for disengaging the motor is met, it meets the regulation. He seems to think all three must be met.

(2)The motors of a motor assisted cycle must turn off or disengage if

(a)the operator stops pedaling,

(b)an accelerator controller is released, or

(c)a brake is applied.

[am. B.C. Reg. 56/2018, s. 2.]


Also, the regulation specifies the limit is 500W rated. My motor is rated 350w and says so on the casing, but I routinely put up to 700w through it for short periods. Probably anyone who challenges a ticket and makes a half-cogent argument will get the ticket thrown out, if the basis for the ticket is moving without pedaling.

Besides, simply requiring pedaling is a little silly. What's the difference between turning a throttle and lightly ghost pedaling? Neither takes any effort.
I'd rather see the rules saying something like "the bike must not produce more than 3x the power input of the rider" and require torque sensors. That'll never happen though.


 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
As much as I would like to see those scooter-style bikes and their legal-dodge pedals driven from the streets, I don't think the traffic cop is interpreting the legislation correctly. The key word is the "or" in (2)(b). As long as one of those three requirements for disengaging the motor is met, it meets the regulation. He seems to think all three must be met.

(2)The motors of a motor assisted cycle must turn off or disengage if

(a)the operator stops pedaling,

(b)an accelerator controller is released, or

(c)a brake is applied.

[am. B.C. Reg. 56/2018, s. 2.]


Also, the regulation specifies the limit is 500W rated. My motor is rated 350w and says so on the casing, but I routinely put up to 700w through it for short periods. Probably anyone who challenges a ticket and makes a half-cogent argument will get the ticket thrown out, if the basis for the ticket is moving without pedaling.

Besides, simply requiring pedaling is a little silly. What's the difference between turning a throttle and lightly ghost pedaling? Neither takes any effort.
I'd rather see the rules saying something like "the bike must not produce more than 3x the power input of the rider" and require torque sensors. That'll never happen though.


In Japan, cadence sensored ebikes are illegal.

Japanese government mandates torque sensor, and they say that the ebike must not be able to assist more than 200% of rider torque.

It's been like this in Japan for several decades now, and ebike companies, including Yamaha are fighting back, stating that only Japan has such useless law.

It takes away the usefulness of ebikes. Throttle can be very useful, and on top of 15mph restriction, it has 200% restriction.

So, if you're an elderly person with knee pain or arthritis, good luck climbing a steep hill.

 
I'd rather see the rules saying something like "the bike must not produce more than 3x the power input of the rider" and require torque sensors. That'll never happen though.

It is interesting to watch video's of cycle ways in the Netherlands. One thing you notice is that Mopeds share the cycle ways with bicycles. Yet, cycling in the Netherlands is 5x safer than in the US. So, I am not so sure that Mopeds need to be restricted. Many in this forum argue for allowing e-bikes there traditional bicycles are allowed. Shouldn't we give the same benefit to others?

I do realize there has to be a limit. Obviously, allowing cars in bike paths and lanes pretty much destroys their whole purpose. But, I think it is quite likely that mopeds can fit within that limit in many places.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Here's the Daymac EM2 electric bicycle.

Yes, it's an ebike.
Limited to 32km/h, has pedals and everything.

 

sl_duck

Member
Here's the Daymac EM2 electric bicycle.

Yes, it's an ebike.
Limited to 32km/h, has pedals and everything.


Oh man, the video on the website is hilarious. Multiple kung-fu scenes as dudes cruise around in sport bike gear. If that's the image they are selling, buyers are going to be sorely disappointed with their 250lb, 32km/h, 500w Lead Acid (!) ride.

 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Oh man, the video on the website is hilarious. Multiple kung-fu scenes as dudes cruise around in sport bike gear. If that's the image they are selling, buyers are going to be sorely disappointed with their 250lb, 32km/h, 500w Lead Acid (!) ride.

Other vendors are selling it as a 5000W, 75km/h to 100km/h (47mph to 62mph) machine.

Daymak is selling it as an ebike, limiting the power to 500W and 32km/h (20mph), which can easily be unlocked.
With those pedals, I guess they're qualified as a power assisted bicycle.

(Link Removed - No Longer Exists)