Cannondale Tesoro Neo X Reviews

RickyBikes

Member
Region
USA
The Cannondale Tesoro Neo X is a hybrid touring bike with an aluminum frame from one of the most trusted companies in biking. This is a class-three electric bike, meaning pedal assist only up to 28mph currently retailing between $3,350 - $4,600 on Cannondale’s website. The Tesoro Neo X is available in high-step and step-through frame options, and comes in three different models. Each model is available in four sizes and one color: the X1 ($4,600) in Gray, the X2 ($4,100) in Midnight Blue, and the X3 ($3,350) in Black. I will touch on all of the model options below, as far as what separates them, but will be speaking mostly to the Tesoro Neo X1 in the pros and cons section.

All Tesoro Neo X bikes offer five ride settings, 180mm Shimano hydraulic disc brakes with motor inhibitors, lock-on grips, and huge 29” tires. As is often the case, quality of components in the drivetrain and drive units are what determine the price difference. The X2 uses an 11-speed chain, the Bosch custom AI offset crank, Shimano Deore derailleur and shifters and the Bosch Performance Line Speed 250W mid-drive unit; the X3 uses a 9-speed chain, a Bosch standard crank, a step down derailleur (Shinmano Alivio) and another step down shifter (Shimano Acera), and Bosch TBA mid-drive unit.

The X1 is a step above the others, though it looks virtually identical to the X2 and X3 models. It has the same Bosch Performance Line Speed 250W Drive Unit as the X2, however it uses the huge Bosch PowerTube 625 battery, providing a range up to 85 miles. It also uses a suspension seat post, upgraded Shimano Deore derailleurs, and step-above 12-speed cogs and shifters.






While I haven't reviewed this electric bike myself, I have covered similar eBikes and I wanted to provide some insights and open things up for your feedback. I hope providing several sources, with varying perspectives, allows everyone to come to their own conclusions. Sometimes short reviews and those created by shops only cover the good aspects and can come off like a commercial, so I've tried to be neutral and objective with these insights.

Pros – things that stand out as good:

  • The first pro is the dealer support and warranty you get when buying with Cannondale. These bikes may cost more than some lesser priced online-only bikes, but there is a massive global network of dealers and repair shops, so you’ll get a good warranty and customer service almost anywhere you go. Not having to put a bike together if you’re new to eBikes is also a luxury.
  • I’ve said it before, and like most people I’ll often say it over and over: I’m a fan of the Bosch mid-drive system. I like them because of the low center of gravity and sense of balance they provide without sacrificing efficiency and zip. This is important because this can be a trekking bike, going across a variety of terrain. It delivers efficiency as you shift gears; to reduce wear, the software utilizes shift detection. The Performance Line Speed Drive Unit provides a solid 85Nm of torque and can provide a boost of up to 340% of your output. This bike is built for distance. The PowerTube 625 battery has a range between 25mph (Turbo mode) – 85mph (Eco mode). The range is based off how full the battery is and the last mile of riding, so it’s tailored to you.
  • If you’ve read my other Cannondale Adventure Neo EQ review, you’ll recall me loving the streamlined and timeless designs Cannondale’s been putting out, and more importantly the seamlessly routing the shifter, brakes, and electronic wires through the frame. I’ll say it again, some eBike companies treat wires as an afterthought, but this proactive design keeps the bike safer – particularly with the way the rear LED light is wired through the carry rack. The Neo X bikes are technically high-step or step-through frames, however the angled design of the high-step is almost like a mid-step which is great for average statured riders.
  • Two things EBR will always love and gush about - water bottle bosses on the downtube or seat tube and rear-mounted adjustable kickstands. This has both - which is vital for a potential hybrid trekking bike. The well-placed kickstand allows for drivetrain maintenance without getting in the way and you won’t have to deal with pedal lock when taking your bike out of your garage or away from a rack. The bosses on the downtube aren’t just for water bottles, they can be used for additional batteries or other accessories too.
  • Since this is a hybrid bike meant for distance, the rear mounting rack is a nice feature. The rack holds just over 40lbs and has long fenders. This is great for multi-terrain bikes because you don’t have to worry about splashing or mud being flung onto your cargo.
  • The Bosch Purion display is small (compared to the Bosch Intuvia display), offers five riding modes (Off, Eco, Tour, Sport, Turbo), and a handy WALK+ mode and will give you a few MPH of assistance. So, if you’re around town and come across snow or an unexpected flat tire, you can walk your bike and it will give you some minor assistance. It’s worth noting that a lot of eBike brands do disable this feature on the Bosch Purion.


Cons – considerations or things that seem like trade-offs or negatives:

  • The Hermans lights are suitable. The taillight is nice and reflective but the headlight could be upgraded. The reflective material on the frame of the bike is fantastic for providing additional visibility for sight-limited places, but reflective material on the tires would be a worthy consideration.
  • The 29” mid-grade Schwalbe tires are meant for gravel. The size of the tire provides comfort and stability, and they have a hybrid tread, but depending on where you ride, a slightly more durable tire might be preferred.
  • The handlebar is wide. This will provide comfort, however if you’re using this bike in a metropolitan area with narrow bikeways, or a trail with tight paths, or even need to put your bike inside your house or a shed at night, this might make the bike a little less maneuverable. The angled tube also makes it a little less than ideal for putting on a bike rack and transporting elsewhere.
  • The Bosch Purion display has a functioning micro-USB port but it’s just for diagnostics, so you won’t be able to charge your phone or other device through it. The display’s five bar battery infographic (20% increments) is fine, but it would be better if it were measured in more precise increments. Perhaps the Bosch Intuvia would be a sensible display upgrade.


As always, I welcome feedback and additions to these pros and cons, especially from people who have tried or own the bike. If you see other great video reviews for the Cannondale Tesoro Neo X, please share them and I may update this post ongoing so we can get the best perspectives and insights.
 

Jim Cook

New Member
Region
USA
City
Georgetown KY
Cannondale is a jerk of a company and doesn't respond to my dealer's contacts.

I have a 2020 Tesoro Neo X1. It has a 500wh battery. I wanted to have a 2nd battery for it that I could swap in for long-distance trips. The dealer ordered the 2nd battery and it arrived, but when I went to use it, there are clips that attach to the battery so the Cannondale battery cover can attach to it. Trying to figure out how to get those clips (can the clips be ordered separately or do they come if they order a 2nd cover, etc...) is impossible to find out. While I love the bike, Cannondale after-sales support sucks apparently.
 

RickyBikes

Member
Region
USA
Cannondale is a jerk of a company and doesn't respond to my dealer's contacts.

I have a 2020 Tesoro Neo X1. It has a 500wh battery. I wanted to have a 2nd battery for it that I could swap in for long-distance trips. The dealer ordered the 2nd battery and it arrived, but when I went to use it, there are clips that attach to the battery so the Cannondale battery cover can attach to it. Trying to figure out how to get those clips (can the clips be ordered separately or do they come if they order a 2nd cover, etc...) is impossible to find out. While I love the bike, Cannondale after-sales support sucks apparently.
Keep us posted on how you go about getting (or not getting) those clips!