Canyon

D

Deleted member 803

Guest
I'm a dealer that sells eBikes and have no interest in Canyon bikes.....................

Had an opportunity to talk to them at their very nice display at Sea Otter. I must admit the bikes are just beautiful to look at and very well engineered and manufactured. As you may know they are a consumer direct company only. My feeling is that they will do very well in the US and that consumers will benefit greatly. I lament the difficulties that IBD's go through to make a living and, if Canyon's model is a big success, it will only encourage more and more vendors to go direct.

Tell me what you think?
 

pxpaulx

Well-Known Member
Bike sales seem to be an in an interesting predicament. I think as a dealer you probably have less to worry about than you think - if online sales of bikes were going to skyrocket and end cycling shops as we know it, that ship would've sailed a decade ago. Your bottom lines on bike sales surely have become slimmer in the last 5-10 years, but most people who ride a bike casually will always need a shop for maintenance and repairs.

The real area for potential loss I see is something like Canyon though, making and selling high end bikes online takes the part of the market that knows exactly what they want, are willing to pay for it, and can also probably maintain it - they will also likely be active in knowing where to get the best bang for their buck - if that ends up being online, those top of the line sales will disappear and probably a big margin along with them.

You'll have to be willing to accept that loss in the internet age, adjust and focus on a positive customer experience - look at how car dealers operate these days - they haven't lost out to the internet, seem to be doing well and focus on a nice customer experience whether they are buying a car or in for an oil change - that is how you'll keep customers coming back.

One other question - does canyon do ebikes? I don't see any on their site. I'm curious if you sell Bulls ebikes too, because they sell their non-ebikes direct only as well...
 

pxpaulx

Well-Known Member
That was an interesting read. Unfortunately the tone misses the mark. Younger buyers want interaction, and will know exactly what they want. In a shop that is going to mean a positive environment that is casual and inviting, but also no BS and expecting all levels of knowledge walking through your door, and being able to cater to each of them.

Instead of shunning online sales for instance, why not partner on a maintenance program and after purchase accessories and parts sales? You have to think bigger picture or a shop just isn't going to thrive.
 

emco5

Active Member
> Younger buyers want interaction, and will know exactly what they want.

From what I’ve experienced, most young consumers do know what they want, like you said. But, it’s all about the price tag and nothing more. The only interaction they want is a pat on the back that confirms they are doing the right thing—like parental approval and gold stars. Many of the current generation are hedonistic and fickle, and they have absolutely no clue about much of anything. The new retail landscape they are ignorantly creating is a downgrade. The 40 and over crowd ask questions and are quite willing to spend to support a LBS, but there aren’t enough of them into bicycles.


> Instead of shunning online sales for instance, why not partner on a maintenance program and after purchase accessories and parts sales? You have to think bigger picture or a shop just isn't going to thrive.

Really?? The consensus of small business owners in the bicycle trade who I’ve talked with wish they had invested their money in something else. Even in a good year there isn’t enough income after expenses to make the stress and hassle worthwhile. Think minimum wage. To “partner on a maintenance program and after purchase accessories and parts sales” is silly absurd and not even worth discussing. That is the “bigger picture”.
 

pxpaulx

Well-Known Member
>

Really?? The consensus of small business owners in the bicycle trade who I’ve talked with wish they had invested their money in something else. Even in a good year there isn’t enough income after expenses to make the stress and hassle worthwhile. Think minimum wage. To “partner on a maintenance program and after purchase accessories and parts sales” is silly absurd and not even worth discussing. That is the “bigger picture”.

I will ignore the 'really' and elaborate. I'm not saying don't sell bikes. I'm saying that for brands that choose to sell direct, partner with them. Perhaps in exchange for a percentage of each sale online (to the b&m Shop) that includes a direct referral and a pre purchased ongoing maintenance package. Buyers get the benefit of a good price with the comfort of a maintenance package (or discount on your in store maintenance), the online sellers give some extra peace of mind with after sale service, and the b&m gets a customer that otherwise would never walk through the door.

Sound a little better?

I'm just on the outside looking in here, but I know write a lot at this point, follow what is going on and see the potential. I've seen enough in the ebike industry that I view as turtling protectionism. With those kind of attitudes, the small shop should be worried. It is time to think bigger, and in such a new segment, maybe rethink entirely.
 

vincent

Well-Known Member
pxpaulx i think the pre bought maintenance program etc are great ideas, i definitely would have done that on some of my bikes if it was available
all of my bikes were shipped to lbs to be assembled and if they had offered me something like that i would have been thrilled

emco i rarely reply to posts like yours, but get sick of different generations bashing others
each generation has its challenges- good people/bad people- strengths/weaknesses etc
the world is always changing and it is changing REALLY fast for these generations
that like everything in life has its pros and cons
this attitude that younger people are mostly clueless and just want a pat on the back etc is ridiculous
and should add that i am 50
 

JRA

Well-Known Member
I have seen that the new mobile bike repair shop van franchises are partnering with internet only sales companies like Canyon. Another (duplex) nail in the B+M coffin it seems.
 

pxpaulx

Well-Known Member
I have seen that the new mobile bike repair shop van franchises are partnering with internet only sales companies like Canyon. Another (duplex) nail in the B+M coffin it seems.

Interesting I was just thinking about how you could go about servicing smaller population areas and this came to mind as an option. Treat it like a satellite store focused on repair.
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
I have seen that the new mobile bike repair shop van franchises are partnering with internet only sales companies like Canyon. Another (duplex) nail in the B+M coffin it seems.
Personally, I can't wait for my metro area to get a Velofix or similar mobile bike repair franchise (none currently that I've been able to find). I'd be really curious to hear (if anyone knows) whether they are typically turning a profit.