Carbon ?

bob armani

Well-Known Member
Found this Superstrata-E recently which looked incredible on every level:

The claim is 61 Xs stronger than steel and 15 Xs stronger than Titanium. On Indiegogo

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TomW

Member
Carbon is directionally strong so it can withstand force in one direction - e.g. stretch / compression forces, but cant handle shearing forces.
Locks will need sharing force resistance.

Exactly, carbon depending on the way it has been weaved and moulded can actually provide flex, the only carbon bike I had was totally rigid side to side, but it was designed to give a little up and down. And it was one of the most comfortable hardtail's I have ridden.
Like those blades they use in the Paralympics to aid running, the are made of layered carbon designed to flex in a particular direction. if they applied the same force in a different direction they would probably snap.
In a development company I used to work for we experimented with a bit of carbon moulding it was pretty interesting but making a entire bike from it must be some kind of art form.
 

bob armani

Well-Known Member
Carbon is directionally strong so it can withstand force in one direction - e.g. stretch / compression forces, but cant handle shearing forces.
Locks will need shearing force resistance.
Another learning curve here. 🧐
 
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bob armani

Well-Known Member
Exactly, carbon depending on the way it has been weaved and moulded can actually provide flex, the only carbon bike I had was totally rigid side to side, but it was designed to give a little up and down. And it was one of the most comfortable hardtail's I have ridden.
Like those blades they use in the Paralympics to aid running, the are made of layered carbon designed to flex in a particular direction. if they applied the same force in a different direction they would probably snap.
In a development company I used to work for we experimented with a bit of carbon moulding it was pretty interesting but making a entire bike from it must be some kind of art form.
Seems like I am seeing more and more of the running blades you have referenced in your post. There is a younger gentleman nearby who I see running with the blades which is really impressive. The momentum they build along with speed is amazing. They truly are an incredible development in this space. Looks like more and more individuals in need of these are making it a reality opposed to years ago.
 

Leon S. Kennedy

New Member
Carbon fiber has very low ductility compared to steel and titanium, so if it fails it will fail without warning. I had a steel folding bike that failed at the joint while riding; I definitely appreciated it flexings considerably before failure as I was able to slow down before complete failure.

Also UV light can degrade carbon fiber, so if after years of use, if the UV protective coating is worn off in spots, it could be a problem.
 

Deafcat

Active Member
@Deafcat Is this similar to something you were working on in a previous life? ;)

Daaamn that's quite the operation! Definitely reminds me of a few places I've worked, but some of this tech is actually way ahead of the curve in not only bike industry... NX parametric CAD design, CNC carbon layup, Renishaw titanium additive... Beauty!