Chain needing replacement after only 500 miles?

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Thanks guys, so is the Shimano dura-ace/xtr cn-hg901 my best option for an 11speed Shimano chain?


My gearing is: 1x11 Shimano Deore XT Derailleur with One-Way Clutch, Shimano Cassette 11-46 Tooth. This is a mountain bike.
If you read the article I cited, they conclude that

"And Shimano users shouldn’t see much reason to stray, either. Shimano chains are seemingly the most efficient on the market while also offering decent durability. Yes, there are more durable chains which are almost as fast (such as YBN), but these may only be worth the extra expense if you’re in the chain waxing clan. If you’re sticking with Shimano 11-speed, I’d say it’s worth upgrading your Shimano chain to at least an Ultegra level, and if efficiency matters to you, then Dura-Ace is worth the extra."

Note that the efficiency edge on the Dura-Acece chain is only .5 watts. I think the Ultegra chain is the best bet in terms of durability, cost and efficiency, for your XT 11 speed, 11-46 set up which is the same as mine on both my CUbe trouing Hybrid and y Riese & Muller Delight Mountain.
 

bikeman242

Active Member
I
If you read the article I cited, they conclude that

"And Shimano users shouldn’t see much reason to stray, either. Shimano chains are seemingly the most efficient on the market while also offering decent durability. Yes, there are more durable chains which are almost as fast (such as YBN), but these may only be worth the extra expense if you’re in the chain waxing clan. If you’re sticking with Shimano 11-speed, I’d say it’s worth upgrading your Shimano chain to at least an Ultegra level, and if efficiency matters to you, then Dura-Ace is worth the extra."

Note that the efficiency edge on the Dura-Acece chain is only .5 watts. I think the Ultegra chain is the best bet in terms of durability, cost and efficiency, for your XT 11 speed, 11-46 set up which is the same as mine on both my CUbe trouing Hybrid and y Riese & Muller Delight Mountain.

I did read the article - thanks for that link. Very helpful.

The description for the Shimano Dura-Ace reads:

"Hollow pins on the HG901 increase lightness, but the chain is still strong enough to handle the high-torque of electric motors for use in e-bike applications."

So it seems the Dura-Ace is suited for eBikes, but the Ultegra chain lacks that eBike comment.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
 

bikeman242

Active Member

I was literally just about to post that. Just saw that the Ultegra also has that eBike qualification. So is this the correct chain to order?


@Alaskan @Stefan Mikes
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I was literally just about to post that. Just saw that the Ultegra also has that eBike qualification. So is this the correct chain to order?


@Alaskan @Stefan Mikes

I guess I have not been clear. After much reading, personal testing and record keeping, the Ultegra 701 is what I use on my 11 speed. My newest ride, a Trek Allant 9.9s has the Shimano 12 speed so I am eager to see if they have made improvements to chain life with the latest generation.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
I was literally just about to post that. Just saw that the Ultegra also has that eBike qualification. So is this the correct chain to order?

There is an improved version and I have been very happy with it.
Check this out:


It is the next level of HG-701 and is designed for Shimano E-8000 series mid-motors.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
The danger with ignoring a worn chain is that the rear cassette cogs will then start to wear, which will result in a more expensive replacement than just replacing the chain.

Here's more than you wanted to know about chains and chain checkers: https://cyclingtips.com/2019/08/bicycle-chain-wear-and-checking-for-it/

I don't know which Parks chain checker the OP has, but for many checkers, roller movement or pin wear can dramatically affect readings and thus show an OK chain as worn. Thee OP is correct that generally 11 and 12 speed chains have less tolerance for wear than 8-10 speed chains, so I'm guessing the Parks guy is just going by the fact that all chain checker tools are conservative, recommending chain replacement sooner rather than later.
That is not the case with me.

I just replace the 11T cog, not the whole cassette. I've done it couple times so far.

I buy a cog from AliExpress, the ZTTO brand, it's less than $2 and quality is impressive considering the price. I don't see the quality difference with my stock Shimano cog.
 

Smong

Member
Does anyone have the actual specs handy for 9 through 12 speed chains so that I can use calipers to measure for wear? I have a 10 speed Shimano Deore set up on my Bafang Ultramax bike and expect it to wear out chains fast. Thanks
 

Smong

Member
Thanks for the link. I really can't justify paying that kind of money for something that can be done with tools that I already have, namely measuring scales and/or calipers.
Maybe I'll just order a replacement chain now and pull the measurements directly off it...;)
A quick search turned up Smorgasborg's link to the cycling tips article that has everything to know about chains...
 
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bikeman242

Active Member
I lost so much money in the stock market this week that I just said screw it and paid the extra 15 bucks for the Dura-ace.

THanks to all for your support in this thread.
 

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
Thanks guys, so is the Shimano dura-ace/xtr cn-hg901 my best option for an 11speed Shimano chain?


My gearing is: 1x11 Shimano Deore XT Derailleur with One-Way Clutch, Shimano Cassette 11-46 Tooth. This is a mountain bike.
That is what I have too. What bike do you have?
 

RabH

Well-Known Member
I am just about to change my 5th chain at 7,700 miles, I have let this last one go past 0.75 as I'm going to change the cassette this time! No skipping at all so far which I'm very happy with, I use KMC chains as I have never had a problem with them! I think my best was almost 2,000 miles which was in summer and my worst was just over 1,000 miles in winter! Very expensive having to replace a chain every 500 miles :eek:
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the link. I really can't justify paying that kind of money for something that can be done with tools that I already have, namely measuring scales and/or calipers.
Maybe I'll just order a replacement chain now and pull the measurements directly off it...;)
A quick search turned up Smorgasborg's link to the cycling tips article that has everything to know about chains...
The width doesn't change when they wear out, the length does. So stretch out 16 links and see if it is exactly 8.00". The length has been 1/2" since skip link chain was abandoned in the 1940's.
I lost so much money in the stock market my Ford stock is paying 34% dividends. I sold half my stock in January when China shut down Wuhan. Didn't take a secret briefing from the CIA in February to see the writing on the wall. Irrational exuberance, massive panic, the stock market is usually one way or the other. I buy during massive panics.
 

bikeman242

Active Member
The danger with ignoring a worn chain is that the rear cassette cogs will then start to wear, which will result in a more expensive replacement than just replacing the chain.

Here's more than you wanted to know about chains and chain checkers: https://cyclingtips.com/2019/08/bicycle-chain-wear-and-checking-for-it/

I don't know which Parks chain checker the OP has, but for many checkers, roller movement or pin wear can dramatically affect readings and thus show an OK chain as worn. Thee OP is correct that generally 11 and 12 speed chains have less tolerance for wear than 8-10 speed chains, so I'm guessing the Parks guy is just going by the fact that all chain checker tools are conservative, recommending chain replacement sooner rather than later.

So I took the chain off, and broke out the tape measure. I measured the entire length of the chain. All of the links are 0.5" in length. The distance over 24 links is almost exactly 12". I measured at multiple points over the chain.

This implies to me that my chain is still like new, and the Park Tool CC-3.2 checker that shows 0.5 wear on this KMC X11e chain with only 500 miles is a bad tool...though I tested the tool on multiple brand new chains, and it shows no wear.

Thoughts? Maybe these checking tools aren't really much use on eBikes?
 

Malcontent

New Member
Thoughts? Maybe these checking tools aren't really much use on eBikes?

No, they are equally useless on regular bikes' chains. I've owned several chain measuring tools and they all gave me nonsense measurements. Brand new chains were measuring as worn, etc.

Someone back then, probably on Usenet, explained that it was due to incorrect measuring technique (something to do with the bushings) and to use a steel ruler instead.

Then the first 3-point chain measuring tools hit the market as well as a detailed description of the problem on pardo.net.

I finally got measurements that made sense and corresponded with measurements done with a metal ruler.