Changing Vado 4 brake pads.

Decho

New Member
Region
United Kingdom
After reading various other posts on here I decided it was time I checked my own brake pads rather than getting the LBS to do it. And I am so glad I did…they were completely shot! I got the old pads out fine B01S, then popped into my LBS for replacements.
I managed to get the pistons back in and installed the pads ok. When I put the wheel back on, on each rotation of the wheel there is a light scuffing noise at one point from the disc. I dont have the red spacer as suggested on the Shimano web site but I watched YouTube video saying to align the brakes loosen the mounting bolts, then apply the brake and whilst holding the brake on, tighten the bolts again. It seemed to help but there’s a u shaped plastic sleeve round one the bolts which if you push open a bit can be rotated and it clicks. Does anyone know what this is for? Any better ways of sorting this? I’m new to bike mechanics but really enjoying learning.
Thanks!

EF2F284E-0375-4FEB-800B-0E056909960B.jpeg
 

Latitude

Well-Known Member
Sorry, I just noticed this. I believe those are just clips that go over the bolts attaching the brakes to the frame. They are designed to keep the bolts from loosening out, not for any brake adjustment purpose.
 

mordase

Member
As already stated the black clip is to stop the bolt from coming off. The method you used to stop rubbing works most of the time but not always. Another trick is to insert spacers either side of the pads between the pads and the disc and then do what you have already done. Lots of YouTube videos covering this. You can use a business card folded in half or buy a dedicated brake disc spacer. The only issue you may find is that there is not enough space to insert the spacers so you will have to take the wheel off, remove the pads and gently push the pistons back using a tyre lever or anything made of plastic. Then reinsert the pads and wheel and insert the spacer. Loosen the calliper mounting bolts, squeeze the brake lever and whilst squeezing the lever tighten the calliper bolts. Then remove the spacers and hopefully the rubbing has stopped. Good luck.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Nevada City, CA & Paradise Valley, AZ
After reading various other posts on here I decided it was time I checked my own brake pads rather than getting the LBS to do it. And I am so glad I did…they were completely shot! I got the old pads out fine B01S, then popped into my LBS for replacements.
I managed to get the pistons back in and installed the pads ok. When I put the wheel back on, on each rotation of the wheel there is a light scuffing noise at one point from the disc. I dont have the red spacer as suggested on the Shimano web site but I watched YouTube video saying to align the brakes loosen the mounting bolts, then apply the brake and whilst holding the brake on, tighten the bolts again. It seemed to help but there’s a u shaped plastic sleeve round one the bolts which if you push open a bit can be rotated and it clicks. Does anyone know what this is for? Any better ways of sorting this? I’m new to bike mechanics but really enjoying learning.
Thanks!

View attachment 93525
If you're just getting some 'scuffing' at one point on the disc rotation a bit of truing of the rotor may be in order. It's not uncommon for rotors to get slightly out of true with heating from braking and getting bumped in bike racks, etc.

There are a number of videos on truing a rotor, including this one;

Holding a white piece of paper on the opposite side of the caliper can help you visualize where the scuffing occurs.
 

Decho

New Member
Region
United Kingdom
Thanks all, yes found the answer on the shimano web site and it’s to stop the mounting bolt coming loose…apparently! Why it’s only on one bolt I have no idea?
All good now…another thing learned about bike maintenance.😊
I’m glad I did it as the pads were in a terrible state after 2000 miles!
Next is checking the chain for wear and stretching!
 

Marcela

Well-Known Member
I’ve found that checking pad alignment while I’m servicing the chain and the bike is suspended on the stand works well as the pad alignment changes with pad wear.