Charger Swap?

jerome

New Member
Hi All,

We now have at home 2 e-motion, one NEO Cross and one Evo Eco.
as the two chargers are using the same standard plug + an adaptor for each battery, I was wondering if I could charge my neo battery with my evo charger (as the neo one is noisy with its fan).
The underlying question is, will it charge quicker as it is a 48V? (my 2 batteries are 36V)

thanks a lot
 

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DouglasXKR

New Member
I wouldn't! The Neo BMS will switch the input off at 42v but the Evo charger will not and will try to fling over 50v in.

The fan is noisy but I put up with it (it's in the garage so I can!). I've found that the slower you charge, the better will the BMS balance the charge.
 

jerome

New Member
I wouldn't! The Neo BMS will switch the input off at 42v but the Evo charger will not and will try to fling over 50v in.

The fan is noisy but I put up with it (it's in the garage so I can!). I've found that the slower you charge, the better will the BMS balance the charge.
Thanks a lot, I will not.
 

StefanK

New Member
I have read that replacing the stock fan with a Noctua 40mm NF-A4x10 FLX 4500RPM fan reduces the noise considerably, some say up to 80%, and actually cools the unit more efficiently :) it does require some wire snipping and reversing polarity, so some electrical knowhow is a must...
 
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J.R.

Well-Known Member
Hi All,

We now have at home 2 e-motion, one NEO Cross and one Evo Eco.
as the two chargers are using the same standard plug + an adaptor for each battery, I was wondering if I could charge my neo battery with my evo charger (as the neo one is noisy with its fan).
The underlying question is, will it charge quicker as it is a 48V? (my 2 batteries are 36V)

thanks a lot
I own a 2015 Evo 29er and my battery is 36 volt, 11.6 amp hour. I have the newer charger and it charges at 42 volt, 2 amp.

Charger:

20170321_151423.jpg

Battery:

20170321_151452.jpg

As you can see by the label on my battery, it charges at 42 volts and hot off the charger the battery reads about ~41.xx volts.

If both of your batteries are 36 volt, it shouldn't matter which charger you use. 36 volts is the nominal voltage, not peak. Check your labels on the batteries. I've never seen any battery charger rated for the nominal voltage of a battery.
 

jerome

New Member
OK, thanks a lot, I saw that too but the neo battery is older and based on Douglas reply, I will not risk to kill my neo battery.
cheers
 

DouglasXKR

New Member
Has anyone fitted the Noctua 40mm NF-A4x10 FLX fan? My unintentional flippant reply about charging these things in the garage is coming home to roost! I'm cycling in the Outer Hebrides, Eriskay today, and previously was nearly chucked out of a pub on Berneray when I plugged it into their socket - all conversation stopped as this thing powered up.
 

Joergen8

Active Member
Never seen a Neo charger, but there shouldn't be anything to it. Red wire on a PC fan is 12V, Black is ground and Yellow is RPM/signal, and rarely 5V. Just undo the 3-pin molex connector by pushing the shiny clips down with a sharp pin, use a 9V battery to verify that Red is +/power. Let the charger sit for at least 15min unplugged before opening. Take a picture of the stock fan inside the charger case, make note of wire colors, clip the leads (leave enough to work with, if directly soldered to the PCB), test stock fan with 9V battery to see which wire was "+" and swap the new fan in with correct polarity. Soldering the wires and heatshrink over the exposed joins would be the best way, but if the fan is connected to the PCB with a connector, just swap the Red and Black into it and tape up the end of the yellow so it can't touch anything live.
 

DouglasXKR

New Member
Never seen a Neo charger, but there shouldn't be anything to it. Red wire on a PC fan is 12V, Black is ground and Yellow is RPM/signal, and rarely 5V. Just undo the 3-pin molex connector by pushing the shiny clips down with a sharp pin, use a 9V battery to verify that Red is +/power. Let the charger sit for at least 15min unplugged before opening. Take a picture of the stock fan inside the charger case, make note of wire colors, clip the leads (leave enough to work with, if directly soldered to the PCB), test stock fan with 9V battery to see which wire was "+" and swap the new fan in with correct polarity. Soldering the wires and heatshrink over the exposed joins would be the best way, but if the fan is connected to the PCB with a connector, just swap the Red and Black into it and tape up the end of the yellow so it can't touch anything live.
Many thanks. I thought I'd just get my wife's Bosch charger for her Motus and make a little plug but it's not that easy. The Bosch will only work if it receives the correct serial input. It's worse than an Enigma m/c and look what happened to the Germans. I'm going to replace the fan and I'm sure it is as easy, relatively, as you suggest. I suspect it's more than just the fan, perhaps the mounting?
 

DouglasXKR

New Member
I have read that replacing the stock fan with a Noctua 40mm NF-A4x10 FLX 4500RPM fan reduces the noise considerably, some say up to 80%, and actually cools the unit more efficiently :) it does require some wire snipping and reversing polarity, so some electrical knowhow is a must...
Good advice! I replaced the fan with exactly the one you recommend, polarity unchanged(?), and the pack came with useful little crimp connectors which made wiring very easy.

I used to be able to hear the thing running in my garage from 20 yards away with the door closed (slight exaggeration) but now, I have to bend down and clamp my ear to it to hear anything (that is an exaggeration!).

I didn't believe it would make any difference but I was wrong, very wrong I'm happpy to say.

Sadly, too late to avoid being barred from every community centre in the Outer Hebrides!