Civante disk brakes are Shimano 105 SM-RT70

Oski1997

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Region
USA
City
San Diego
The Civante has a nice upgrade from the other Yamaha bikes. The Civante has the disk brake rotors (SM-RT70) used by the Shimano 105 7000 series with ICE TECHNOLOGIES to "significantly reduce heat build-up in the brake system to ensure consistent high performance braking even on the steepest downhill stretches". These 105 disc brakes are ebike rated by Shimano. This was a nice surprise =) Compared to the Urban Rush, the Civante uses the updated Tiagra 2019 calipers (BR-4770) while the Urban Rush uses the older calipers (BR-405). The newer BR-4770 calipers use the same brake hose kit as the Dura Ace calipers. Additionally, the Civantes’ hydraulic levers use the same cable pull ratios as the current 11-speed group sets. This means we can “unofficially” use the Dura Ace (R9120) and Ultegra (R8020) derailleurs with our 4720 Tiagra shifters when it’s time to upgrade.
 

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Oski1997

Active Member
Region
USA
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San Diego
The Civante has a nice upgrade from the other Yamaha bikes. The Civante has the disk brakes (SM-RT70) used by the Shimano 105 7000 series. These 105 disc brakes are ebike rated by Shimano. This was a nice surprise =)
 

Oski1997

Active Member
Region
USA
City
San Diego
Because the Civante has the SM-RT70 Shimano rotor (used in the 105 group set), we can use the L03A resin brake pad or the L04C metal pad inteded for the 105 to Dura-Ace group. All new Civantes come with the L03A resin brake pad installed. So, if you'd like more braking power, you can try the L04C metal version.
 

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Oski1997

Active Member
Region
USA
City
San Diego
Thanks for the info, this is good to know
thanks. I also found out it would be a good idea to replace my chain after just 1,000 miles in order to save wear and tear on the cassette. So, I bought Shimano’s ebike chain CN-E6090-10. And wow, the shifting on the bike is 2x better than on the KMC chain that came with the bike. On the KMC, the chain would sometimes stall to shift up or down and sometimes I’d have to click on the levers more than once. Now, the chain moves up and down at the first click and it’s quick. I can’t say enough about Shimano’s ebike chain.
 

Oski1997

Active Member
Region
USA
City
San Diego
Thanks for the info, this is good to know
Also, if you ride fast down hills, I don’t know about you but I never felt that safe with the braking power on the resin pads (L03A). So, I replaced them with the metal pads (L04C) and the stopping power is again 2x better. I feel in control of the bike’s braking capability now. I hope this helps.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I use the metal pads on both my Allant 9.9s and my Topstone Neo Carbon 3. Pay heed to proper bedding of the new brake pads using the sintered metal in order to assure maximum braking power and minimum squeal and brake noise. They still give a slight watery gurgling noise braking at speed on a steep downhill but nothing to draw any attention from nearby folks.

Here is a good how to video from Park tool
 

Oski1997

Active Member
Region
USA
City
San Diego
I use the metal pads on both my Allant 9.9s and my Topstone Neo Carbon 3. Pay heed to proper bedding of the new brake pads using the sintered metal in order to assure maximum braking power and minimum squeal and brake noise. They still give a slight watery gurgling noise braking at speed on a steep downhill but nothing to draw any attention from nearby folks.

Here is a good how to video from Park tool
I kept reading about the noise from many online forums but it’s not noticeable. My riding group couldn’t tell I had gone from the resin (L03a) to the metal (L04C). I installed them myself and that was the first time I’d ever done any bike job on any bike. Lol. I also know that metal brake pads are only meant for certain rotors. The cheaper ones shouldn’t use them and the Dura Ace ones recommend the Titanium pads. Maybe most of the users with noise didn’t have the right rotors?? I know I didn’t know what I was doing installing my pads and no noticeable noise on my end. Maybe louder but not much of a different kind of sound from braking.
 

fooferdoggie

Well-Known Member
I think it also depends on the caliper. on my magura mt4's metal pads were really noisy and when they got wet horrible then I had the weird worbling sound in front that would not go away even when nI went back to the organic pads had to change the rotor. but the metal pads on my Shimano 4 piston it's and same rotors are very quiet even when wet.
 

Oski1997

Active Member
Region
USA
City
San Diego
I think it also depends on the caliper. on my magura mt4's metal pads were really noisy and when they got wet horrible then I had the weird worbling sound in front that would not go away even when nI went back to the organic pads had to change the rotor. but the metal pads on my Shimano 4 piston it's and same rotors are very quiet even when wet.
Thanks for the insight fooferdoggie. The Civante has the new Tiagra calipers (BR-4770) that came out last year with the hydraulic levers with trickle down tech from the 105’s and it has the 105 rotors (SM-RT70). These work great with the metal (L04C) pads. I am surprised just how precise the compatibility issue is with bike parts. Just bc something looks like it should work it really doesn’t with Shimano most of the time (I think).
 
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Greydog

Member
Region
USA
Thanks for the tip about the chain. I am still waiting on my Civante to come in as it has been delayed 5 weeks. It is supposed to arrive at the Yammy warehouse on the 14th so I should get it the end of May. The riding weather here in MN has been lousy so I don't feel too bad. I will probably upgrade the chain right off the bat. Sometimes you have to change out the cassette if it has a lot of miles on it when putting on a new chain due to wear. It is amazing how better chains shift smoother. Same goes for cassettes.

Also, thanks for the brake info. I will be changing to organic composite Kool Stop pads.

I do not believe that you will be able to use the Shimano Ultegra 8020 rear derailleur in place of the Tiagra. The 8020 is 11 spd and the Tiagra is 10 speed. The spacing of the cassettes are different between 10 and 11 spds. You should be able to upgrade to an 11 speed cassette though.
 

Oski1997

Active Member
Region
USA
City
San Diego
Thanks for the tip about the chain. I am still waiting on my Civante to come in as it has been delayed 5 weeks. It is supposed to arrive at the Yammy warehouse on the 14th so I should get it the end of May. The riding weather here in MN has been lousy so I don't feel too bad. I will probably upgrade the chain right off the bat. Sometimes you have to change out the cassette if it has a lot of miles on it when putting on a new chain due to wear. It is amazing how better chains shift smoother. Same goes for cassettes.

Also, thanks for the brake info. I will be changing to organic composite Kool Stop pads.

I do not believe that you will be able to use the Shimano Ultegra 8020 rear derailleur in place of the Tiagra. The 8020 is 11 spd and the Tiagra is 10 speed. The spacing of the cassettes are different between 10 and 11 spds. You should be able to upgrade to an 11 speed cassette though.
Thanks for the info. Btw - what do you like about the Kool Stop pads over Shimano’s L04C metal pads? Also, do you think 1,000 miles on the old chain was too many to keep the old cassette with the new Shimano chain?
 

todbar

Member
Thanks for the info. Btw - what do you like about the Kool Stop pads over Shimano’s L04C metal pads? Also, do you think 1,000 miles on the old chain was too many to keep the old cassette with the new Shimano chain?
Oski, - cassette should be fine, especially since it's shifting well now with the new chain. I think longevity can depend on how "smoothly" you routinely shift it...
 

Greydog

Member
Region
USA
Todbar is correct about your cassette. So no worries. It might be an issue if you had 5K hard miles on your bike as you might notice some noise or not as crisp shifting. I had that issue when I upgraded components on my very old professional racing bike- a Peugeot PX-10 which I dearly miss (I had so many miles on it that the bottom bracket developed too much flex and the crank would wobble on hard acceleration). It was 19 pounds and Reynolds 531 butted tubing, tubular tires and very fast and smooth. I had upgraded the chain but ended up having to get a new cassette (free wheel).

I think that the Shimano Pads are excellent. We have used Kool Stops on caliper brakes and they stop great. I will probably try the Kool Stop E-bike or Aero Kool pads over the metal or SwissStop. Metal is great and the way to go if you are riding a lot of hills or mountains. They stop great and last longer. Here in MN it is pretty flat with some rolling hills so I would prefer a pad that is potentially more quiet.

SwissStop also makes a pad with ceramic, brass and kevlar that are supposed to stop well and be extremely quiet.


 
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todbar

Member
thanks. I also found out it would be a good idea to replace my chain after just 1,000 miles in order to save wear and tear on the cassette. So, I bought Shimano’s ebike chain CN-E6090-10. And wow, the shifting on the bike is 2x better than on the KMC chain that came with the bike. On the KMC, the chain would sometimes stall to shift up or down and sometimes I’d have to click on the levers more than once. Now, the chain moves up and down at the first click and it’s quick. I can’t say enough about Shimano’s ebike chain.
I got the Shimano chain and it's so much better. Cleaner shifting, and just a smoother pedaling feel overall. Great idea, thanks