Class 3 bike

Bgsnmky

New Member
HI everyone!!! I will be posting a much more detailed request for help on purchasing my first e-bike, but right now while trying to limit my choices, I am trying to understand the Class 3 bikes.

I don't think my requirements REQUIRE a class 3 as I am not interested in the speed, but I don't want to get a class 3 if it means I can't ride it in national parks etc.

So silly question I am sure, but if I had a class 3 bikes what would it LIMIT me from doing.
I did google and found that Class 2 and 3 bikes are allowed in the parks but just not allowed o use the throttle. That is what I would hope is that the bike will be allowed and it would be more NOT going over a speed limit or something.

BUT are there other limitations I am not thinking about where i should ELIMINATE these from my choices.
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
There are some good informative threads on laws and regulations here:

In 2019 when new regs were announced for NPS land they said basically the state laws where the park was located would govern ebike use in the park. Which made a lot of sense. There seems to be some revisions to NPS regs in 2020.

 

rich c

Well-Known Member
No one requires a class 3. Even commuters that want the speed can leave 15 minutes earlier to get to work. But I really enjoy my daily exercise 11 mile rides at speeds around 20-22mph. I’m really surprised that “please don’t use your throttle” is allowed where there are class restrictions. Do they really assume riders will do that? I think quite a few folks own more than one eBike for different uses.
 

BET

Active Member
I have two bikes that are class 2/3 depending on the top speed selected on the display. I wanted bikes with a throttle. It does not effect where I ride but rules maybe different where you are. It seems some places just say do not use your throttle. Some other places will only permit ebikes that are class 1 without throttles. I havd heard some riders have disabled their throttles temporarily. Best to research rules in your local area. On roads generally all classes of e bikes are permitted, except for highways of course.
 

Rob NJ

Active Member
My wife and I have two class 3 bikes. Trek Allant+ 9.9 and a Trek SuperCommuter +8. We have ridden the bikes in many national parks, state parks, local paths, and even on a Vermont Bike Tour in Arizona - Saguaro National Park. We have never run into anyone that has asked us what the class was, nor have any concerns/objections from park rangers. I think it is all about being safe and smart. Act like a jerk and you will get some grief.

As far as which class? I would go with class 3. You may not think that you need the speed, but it is very helpful to pop it into Turbo and be able to keep up with traffic in the city or on stretches of the road where you want to get done quick. The speed is there when you need it. I like to pedal, so don't want a throttle (to each his own).
 

Mulezen

Well-Known Member
^ I had a class one Trek Super Commuter 7. Loved the bike but almost immediately regretted not getting the SC8. Now I have an Allant 9.9 and couldn’t be happier.
 

Gordon71

Active Member
The National Park where I ride does not permit class 2 or 3 Ebikes. Mine is a class 2 but I can convert it to a class 1 just by unplugging the throttle. That can't be said for a class 3.
 

Buckeye Biker

New Member
I have a Class 3 bike, but on universal paths with pedestrians, I generally am riding acoustically if there is anyone within sight. I have seen some vids of people constantly riding 20+mph on crowded paths, and I think that is pretty obnoxious, honestly. Just ride responsibly and safely and Class 3s are fine.
 
"but if I had a class 3 bikes what would it LIMIT me from doing?" It would limit you to having to plod along at 15-18 miles per hour. Once you get used to doing 20-28 mph there is no going back. You may not use it all the time, but it is good to have when you want it. Do you buy a car with the barest minimum motor or one with enough motor to comfortably carry four people and some luggage?
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Do you buy a car with the barest minimum motor or one with enough motor to comfortably carry four people and some luggage?
This is not exactly like this. A Class 3 e-bike doesn't need to have a more powerful motor than the Class 1 one. It is just the matter of the speed limiter setting (that can only be done by the dealer for big brands). For instance, Specialized Turbo Vado 5.0 sold in the U.S. and in Canada is exactly the same e-bike, equipped with a powerful e-MTB motor. Yet, the U.S. Vado is of Class 3, and the Canadian one is of Class 1. Just the speed limiter setting. Both e-bikes are equally excellent climbers but the Canadian Vado is not that fast as the U.S. one.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
If I go under 20 and pedal is anybody checking what class my bike is?
So far, I've never had the class of my bike checked. A park ranger I spoke to recently admitted they aren't checking e-bikes for permitted class. Of course, this will vary by location.

Riding an illegal bike could have huge legal implications however should you get into an injury accident.
 

Gordon71

Active Member
So far, I've never had the class of my bike checked. A park ranger I spoke to recently admitted they aren't checking e-bikes for permitted class. Of course, this will vary by location.

Riding an illegal bike could have huge legal implications however should you get into an injury accident.
That's a good point that I didn't think of. I've actually never seen any authority on the trails I ride. Actually I rarely see anyone but still unplug my throttle just to be on the safe side.
 

BET

Active Member
The National Park where I ride does not permit class 2 or 3 Ebikes. Mine is a class 2 but I can convert it to a class 1 just by unplugging the throttle. That can't be said for a class 3.
Most places with limits, including National Parks, just want you to ride it without throttle. As long as you are pedaling and not going faster than 20 mph I doubt they will bother you.
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
So far, I've never had the class of my bike checked. A park ranger I spoke to recently admitted they aren't checking e-bikes for permitted class. Of course, this will vary by location.

Riding an illegal bike could have huge legal implications however should you get into an injury accident.

Thats a good point 6- I'm sure there's an attorney lickin his chops to find the bike accident where the bike at fault was an ebike with a modified controller set from 20 to 28...
 

BET

Active Member
To be liable in any accident you have to be negligent. Did you violate a duty of care to someone, and if you did, was your negligence the proximate cause of their injury ? In plainer English, was your screw up the cause of someone getting hurt ? For example, was your going too fast the cause of the injury ? Then you may be liable. Maybe you want to get some bike insurance that covers liability ( as well as theft of your bike) or have an insurance imbrella policy that covers various risks not otherwise covered. I go by the policy of being careful, avoiding risk and following the law. So far, it works for me.
 

mogulskier

Active Member
I have a Class 3 bike, but on universal paths with pedestrians, I generally am riding acoustically if there is anyone within sight. I have seen some vids of people constantly riding 20+mph on crowded paths, and I think that is pretty obnoxious, honestly. Just ride responsibly and safely and Class 3s are fine.

Also potentially dangerous on shared paved paths. 20mph+ is pretty fast and you can't predict behavior or intention. People can and do get hurt.