Class 3 mtb

mvbike

New Member
Region
USA
I am aware that class 3 (28 mph) mountain bikes just don’t exist. My understanding is that it is a safety and regulatory issue. I am looking to buy a second bike (my first bike will be a Creo) that I can use to bomb around with and just have fun and do a little bit of light trail. I would like something that goes 28 mph to enable me to get to places fast and of course with more fun. The closest thing I have found is the mountain bike inspired frame of Cannondales Tesoro X1. This has the Bosch performance speed motor (a real powerhouse with 85 nm of torque). It also has a front suspension of 100mm of travel. However, I hear that this bike won’t be available the summer of next year.

Any of suggestions for class 3 bike with off road capabilities with at least a front suspension would be appreciated
 

WinterKill

Member
Region
USA
City
East Bethel
Bulls EVO Iconic TR1 speed is an option, attached is a link to tread discussing it. They also have the E-Stream EVO 45AM.

 

mvbike

New Member
Region
USA
Bulls EVO Iconic TR1 speed is an option, attached is a link to tread discussing it. They also have the E-Stream EVO 45AM.

Wow...very interesting bike and definitely fits what I am looking for. Also, very cool looking rig.

Thanks so much for sharing this with me. It is on my short list and I will be checking it out.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
I am aware that class 3 (28 mph) mountain bikes just don’t exist. My understanding is that it is a safety and regulatory issue. I am looking to buy a second bike (my first bike will be a Creo) that I can use to bomb around with and just have fun and do a little bit of light trail. I would like something that goes 28 mph to enable me to get to places fast and of course with more fun. The closest thing I have found is the mountain bike inspired frame of Cannondales Tesoro X1. This has the Bosch performance speed motor (a real powerhouse with 85 nm of torque). It also has a front suspension of 100mm of travel. However, I hear that this bike won’t be available the summer of next year.

Any of suggestions for class 3 bike with off road capabilities with at least a front suspension would be appreciated
WattWagons Hydra

With Archon X1 option, 2300W nominal, 3000W max power.

 

mogulskier

Active Member
Look into the Surface 604 Shred. 500W hub motor, but is extremely powerful and the Torque sensor could be confused with a mid-drive, because it is highly responsive.

It is a class 3 e-mtb hardtail. In addition to a throttle, it as 5 PAS levels and a top speed of 28mph with PAS and a 20mph throttle. Cost I believe is around 2200-2300 USD.

It's a great light trail bike that you can also commute with. But is intended for trail use primarily or an entry-level mountain bike to see if you are into it and want to advance, but don't want to spend 5K plus. I would not go tackling any moderate or higher Mountain trails.

The front forks are this bikes achilles heel and is prohibitive for bombing down mountain trails.
 

McCorby

Well-Known Member
It is a class 3 e-mtb hardtail. In addition to a throttle, it as 5 PAS levels and a top speed of 28mph with PAS and a 20mph throttle. Cost I believe is around 2200-2300 USD.
I’m curious, can it really be classified as a class 3, even if the throttle is limited to 20 mph? I thought class 3 is defined as 28 mph, PAS only, no throttle.

This is my understanding of the classes:
Class 1 - 20 mph, PAS only
Class 2 - 20 mph, with throttle
Class 3 - 28 mph, PAS only
 
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mogulskier

Active Member
I’m curious, can it really be classified as a class 3, even if the throttle is limited to 20 mph? I thought class 3 is defined as 28 mph, PAS only, no throttle.

This is my understanding of the classes:
Class 1 - 20 mph, PAS only
Class 2 - 20 mph, with throttle
Class 3 - 28 mph, PAS only

I knew class 3 meant a 28mph limit with PAS only; in some cases the bike may be shipped as class 2, but can be unlocked to a class 3 by the user who then accepts all responsibility. However, I did not know that your bike can never be classified as class 3 if it has a throttle. So that is new to me. I am sure this varies by state as to what manufacturers are allowed to sell.
 

McCorby

Well-Known Member
I knew class 3 meant a 28mph limit with PAS only; in some cases the bike may be shipped as class 2, but can be unlocked to a class 3 by the user who then accepts all responsibility. However, I did not know that your bike can never be classified as class 3 if it has a throttle. So that is new to me. I am sure this varies by state as to what manufacturers are allowed to sell.
Yes, ”Unlocking a class 2 bike to achieve up to 28 mph would technically still not make it a class 3 if it still retains a throttle. It would become a class that does not currently exist. States do not have different definitions for the 3 classes, but states, cities, towns, etc. may have different laws and regulations for the different classes.
 

McCorby

Well-Known Member
Yes, ”Unlocking a class 2 bike to achieve up to 28 mph would technically still not make it a class 3 if it still retains a throttle. It would become a class that does not currently exist. States do not have different definitions for the 3 classes, but states, cities, towns, etc. may have different laws and regulations for the different classes.
I stand corrected. In another active thread I learned that Class 3 can have a throttle if it’s limited to 20 mph. The actual definition of class 3 seems a bit confusing.....


I then researched a little and found however that some states such as California do not allow class 3 bikes to have throttles. So it’s definitely best to check your state’s and city’s laws and regulations if you are concerned.

I apologize for any confusion I may have caused.

Edit: I did a little more research, and it appears that what constitutes being a class 3 bike varies all over the place!! Very confusing to say the least!
 
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AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Buy whatever you want and ride it in a sane/conservative manner. End of problem.

Laws ARE confusing, and just as much so for law enforcement. For that reason, there is VERY little enforcement....
 

McCorby

Well-Known Member
Buy whatever you want and ride it in a sane/conservative manner. End of problem.

Laws ARE confusing, and just as much so for law enforcement. For that reason, there is VERY little enforcement....
I hear this a lot, but some people actually want to understand and abide by the laws when riding....... Having a clear and consistent definition of the different classes would be helpful. This shouldn’t be rocket science! Lol
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
I hear this a lot, but some people actually want to understand and abide by the laws when riding....... Having a clear and consistent definition of the different classes would be helpful. This shouldn’t be rocket science! Lol
I was talking about the "no rocket science" approach. Seriously. The ONLY way you are going to stay absolutely legal is going to require you to change bikes to respond to whatever local enforcement allows. What you're going to find is that's ALL OVER THE BALL PARK. There is no uniformity. The laws are stupid, and enforcement knows that. That said, there are some that are actively trying to improve that situation. Like Florida. They are very actively trying to attract more biking tourists. Bike trails are a hot topic, with a LOT of money being spent.

Their approach to biking laws? Ride your e-bike anywhere a bicycle can go - regardless of what class it is. That just happened this past summer - and should give you an idea of the BS currently in place elsewhere.
 

mogulskier

Active Member
Buy whatever you want and ride it in a sane/conservative manner. End of problem.

Laws ARE confusing, and just as much so for law enforcement. For that reason, there is VERY little enforcement....

Exactly. As I've said before, there is NO enforcement that I have ever seen, on trail or off. I agree with you, just ride sane and save the wild stuff on the dedicated bike trails where your with other like minded folks.
 

mogulskier

Active Member
I was talking about the "no rocket science" approach. Seriously. The ONLY way you are going to stay absolutely legal is going to require you to change bikes to respond to whatever local enforcement allows. What you're going to find is that's ALL OVER THE BALL PARK. There is no uniformity. The laws are stupid, and enforcement knows that. That said, there are some that are actively trying to improve that situation. Like Florida. They are very actively trying to attract more biking tourists. Bike trails are a hot topic, with a LOT of money being spent.

Their approach to biking laws? Ride your e-bike anywhere a bicycle can go - regardless of what class it is. That just happened this past summer - and should give you an idea of the BS currently in place elsewhere.

I am beginning to like Florida. I like their approach to ebikes.