Cold and wet weather cycling wear

BBassett

Active Member
So just some thoughts as I read your post have you tried darn tuff socks and yes they're not cheap? If your wearing two pairs of socks their is good chance your wearing the wrong socks or foot wear or both. I wear a pair of Iron ridge boots from cabela's for winter they work great it was 13f the other day and they where fine. AS far as wool goes if it's the right blend and quality it breathe and regulate and wick moisture and keep warm even when wet. Layering is key and you don't many if done correctly.
Smartwool socks wear incredibly well probably like your Darn-tuff socks. With the right boots, I think you're right, you only need one pair of socks when walking and moving around. 20+ years in military-style footwear taught me how to survive cold and wet weather. It's different (for me) riding a bike for 8 or more hours at a time. I don't want massive heavy boots on while riding usually. Having several pairs of socks (7), thick to thin, ankle through knee-high, wool and water-proof (kinda)... allows me to stop and adjust for temperature and change/add when and if my feet get cold or wet. But... just like with gloves I am hoping someone starts selling a superior heated version soon that's nice and thin, flexible, light, energy-efficient and free for all.

Ride safe.
 

BBassett

Active Member
Did you buy the REI brand rain pants? I almost bought a pair the other day let us know how they work out not that i want it to down pour on you:) but sometimes it rains instead of snows here in N.H. I want to know how good they are! I JUST RELIZED IT LOOKS LIKE YOU BOUGHT THEM LAST YEAR so how good are they??
Check out Solomon rain pants the material breaths really well and seems to be wearing well.
 

Nomad

Active Member
Smartwool socks wear incredibly well probably like your Darn-tuff socks. With the right boots, I think you're right, you only need one pair of socks when walking and moving around. 20+ years in military-style footwear taught me how to survive cold and wet weather. It's different (for me) riding a bike for 8 or more hours at a time. I don't want massive heavy boots on while riding usually. Having several pairs of socks (7), thick to thin, ankle through knee-high, wool and water-proof (kinda)... allows me to stop and adjust for temperature and change/add when and if my feet get cold or wet. But... just like with gloves I am hoping someone starts selling a superior heated version soon that's nice and thin, flexible, light, energy-efficient and free for all.

Ride safe.
They work great for me cycling to work in the snow thats the trade off there guaranteed for life
 

BBassett

Active Member
They work great for me cycling to work in the snow thats the trade off there guaranteed for life
If I had a dollar for everything I have purchased that had a "life-time guarantee" only to find out that it didn't. But.... "Our unconditional lifetime guarantee is simple and without strings or conditions. If our socks are not the most comfortable, durable and best fitting socks you have ever owned, return them for another pair. ", is worth trying out so I just bought a pair of Element over-the-calf light cushion. So I'm holding you responsible! ;) Thanks for the tip.
 

Jimbo08

Active Member
Different price point, but bombproof and waterproof- Endura MT500 has proven one of the best I have tried. Lots of great rain wear out there, but when it comes to a riding fit not all pass the test.
 

BBassett

Active Member
I agree there is lots of rain gear out there that claims to be great and may just be... for a while. Most of it isn't so great after being worn for a couple thousand miles on the bike. Thanks

Ride safe.
 

Nomad

Active Member
If I had a dollar for everything I have purchased that had a "life-time guarantee" only to find out that it didn't. But.... "Our unconditional lifetime guarantee is simple and without strings or conditions. If our socks are not the most comfortable, durable and best fitting socks you have ever owned, return them for another pair. ", is worth trying out so I just bought a pair of Element over-the-calf light cushion. So I'm holding you responsible! ;) Thanks for the tip.
one thing you need to watch is there sizes they run small if you ordered and didn't try them on but other then that I have 3 pairs and have not had any issues.
 

tomjasz

Well-Known Member
After decades of Thorlo Wool Expedition socks I've started buying Darn Tough socks. IMO and IMNSHE merino wool is a fantastic wicking and insulating material. I can wear a thinner sock and be just as warm. So far I haven't worn a pair out to see what they say to my return for warranty. BUT I do have a dozen pairs of Thorlo socks with blown-out heels. Worn out well before the rest of the sock shows any real signs of wear. I sent Throlo a picture of several dozen pairs laid out on my bedroom floor asking what would they do fo me...NOTHING. They did finally send a spool of wool thread for me to darn some of the lest worn.
 

tomjasz

Well-Known Member
I guess that because I am not fishing or doing vigorous activity but rather riding my Ebike these Arcteyx pants are the Cats Pajamas to me. The parts of me that they cover never get wet and that is what I want.
I've worked outdoors my entire life. MN, WI, FL, ID, MT, USVI, NV, and CA. In all weather and conditions. It's about the right zipper and proper gear maintenance. Throwing out zippers because someone didn't maintain their gear seems pretty silly to me. Arcteyx and "Patagucci" are favored gear here.
 

Nomad

Active Member
After decades of Thorlo Wool Expedition socks I've started buying Darn Tough socks. IMO and IMNSHE merino wool is a fantastic wicking and insulating material. I can wear a thinner sock and be just as warm. So far I haven't worn a pair out to see what they say to my return for warranty. BUT I do have a dozen pairs of Thorlo socks with blown-out heels. Worn out well before the rest of the sock shows any real signs of wear. I sent Throlo a picture of several dozen pairs laid out on my bedroom floor asking what would they do fo me...NOTHING. They did finally send a spool of wool thread for me to darn some of the lest worn.
I ussaully blowout the heal in socks I haven't in my DARN TOUGH socks
 

BBassett

Active Member
You gotta love when a manufacturer stands behind their products don't ya? When I was running a lot in the military (on cobblestones hence the bad ankles) the best shoes for me were New Balance, not cheap but they also wore out fast. I contacted them through snail mail, the internet hadn't even been invented yet, and sent the tops of all the boxes of shoes I had bought. They sent me a pair of shoes with a note saying that for every three pair that I bought they would give me another pair. That lasted until I moved back to the States.
 

BBassett

Active Member
Silly thinking someone has to neglect their gear to see the weakness in a zipper. Of course, my background is military so it's more about function and durability than something to play in. Maybe that's why their rain pants don't have zippers, always thinking about worst-case scenarios I guess, it's surely not that they are too pricey. Ahhhhh, the advantages of always being able to rely on the best of situations. But like I said, I don't find it hard to stay warm and dry on my bike anymore.
 

Toomanycats

Active Member
These aren’t rain pants but I’ve really loved them for the 45-50 degree weather we occasionally get in Southern California. They have a light, cozy fleece lining
 

BBassett

Active Member
These aren’t rain pants but I’ve really loved them for the 45-50 degree weather we occasionally get in Southern California. They have a light, cozy fleece lining
$130?!? I go on ebay and buy Rockbros winter fleece cycle pants, never paid more than $20. I'm hard as hell on the knees of most pants and these have stood up pretty well. They aren't water-proof at all and the material seemed slippery at first on the bike seat. It does bug me having to buy an XL after having lost 127 lbs though. They keep me warm (enough) at 40 to 60 degs F. and I can always throw on knee socks, long-johns, and/or rain pants over them if necessary. I like they are tight but stretch and are still comfortable.

 

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
These aren’t rain pants but I’ve really loved them for the 45-50 degree weather we occasionally get in Southern California. They have a light, cozy fleece lining
Up here those would be a good base layer for underneath the rain pants.

.
 

Toomanycats

Active Member
$130?!? I go on ebay and buy Rockbros winter fleece cycle pants, never paid more than $20. I'm hard as hell on the knees of most pants and these have stood up pretty well. They aren't water-proof at all and the material seemed slippery at first on the bike seat. It does bug me having to buy an XL after having lost 127 lbs though. They keep me warm (enough) at 40 to 60 degs F. and I can always throw on knee socks, long-johns, and/or rain pants over them if necessary. I like they are tight but stretch and are still comfortable.

I buy most of my regular clothes from Costco or Walmart. So I save up to spend money on cycling clothes.
Btw, unless you are small and thin, it’s tough to find quality women’s cycling clothes at a decent price. The less expensive stuff tends to be Chinese made, and sized very small.
If a woman decides to go with men’s cycling clothes, the proportions can be all wrong (sleeves too long, shoulders too wide). Clothes from REI like those mentioned by the OP aren’t cheap, either, unless you get them on sale, and then the larger sizes go first.
 

BBassett

Active Member
I buy most of my regular clothes from Costco or Walmart. So I save up to spend money on cycling clothes.
Btw, unless you are small and thin, it’s tough to find quality women’s cycling clothes at a decent price. The less expensive stuff tends to be Chinese made, and sized very small.
If a woman decides to go with men’s cycling clothes, the proportions can be all wrong (sleeves too long, shoulders too wide). Clothes from REI like those mentioned by the OP aren’t cheap, either, unless you get them on sale, and then the larger sizes go first.
Well, if they look as good on you as they do the model then they were worth the money.

Ride safe.
 

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
I buy most of my regular clothes from Costco or Walmart. So I save up to spend money on cycling clothes.
Btw, unless you are small and thin, it’s tough to find quality women’s cycling clothes at a decent price. The less expensive stuff tends to be Chinese made, and sized very small.
If a woman decides to go with men’s cycling clothes, the proportions can be all wrong (sleeves too long, shoulders too wide). Clothes from REI like those mentioned by the OP aren’t cheap, either, unless you get them on sale, and then the larger sizes go first.
Aha ... that would explain why so many things I buy that are called size "medium" fit so tight when I get them home. Either "medium" is shrinking or I am expanding... probably a bit of both.
 

BBassett

Active Member
I got to take some new cold weather gloves for a spin today (SealSkinz Extreme Cold Weather). Couple of hours riding in freezing weather. They kept my hands warm enough (without liners) that I wasn't whining hardly at all and I'm a baby, no numb fingers. It wasn't raining but I know how good Sealskinz are in wet weather. Mixed emotions about wiping snot onto new $80 gloves though.
 

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