Colder weather clothing

Latitude

Well-Known Member
I’m finding it interesting that as the weather gets cooler here, I am layering up for biking in a similar way that I do for sailing. Lightweight technical shirts, possibly adding a fleece, then a rain or wind shell that is breathing (Arcteryx). For heavier weather I have a Gill offshore hooded jacket that is Gore-Tex lined and carries reflective tape. Interesting that there are similar characteristics in some of the clothing for cycling, skiing and sailing. Breathability, longer back panels, zippered vents. Anyone have a favourite brand or article of cycling clothing for colder weather? I’m going to need to investigate gloves.
 

rdowns

Well-Known Member
Me too, Similar to running, but I get colder on my bike. I'm looking for a wind proof shell right now. I think I have most of the other layers.
 

fooferdoggie

Well-Known Member

Dallant

Well-Known Member
I’m finding it interesting that as the weather gets cooler here, I am layering up for biking in a similar way that I do for sailing. Lightweight technical shirts, possibly adding a fleece, then a rain or wind shell that is breathing (Arcteryx). For heavier weather I have a Gill offshore hooded jacket that is Gore-Tex lined and carries reflective tape. Interesting that there are similar characteristics in some of the clothing for cycling, skiing and sailing. Breathability, longer back panels, zippered vents. Anyone have a favourite brand or article of cycling clothing for colder weather? I’m going to need to investigate gloves.
I haven’t had to use them yet but I just got some (Amazon) Unigear winter waterproof gloves for men and women, lightweight touch screen gloves. They do seem pretty awesome since they aren’t bulky, feel a little rubbery on the palm area outside and velvety on the inside. Touchscreen works great.
Guess we’ll see when the weather gets cold and wet.
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
I’m finding it interesting that as the weather gets cooler here, I am layering up for biking in a similar way that I do for sailing. Lightweight technical shirts, possibly adding a fleece, then a rain or wind shell that is breathing (Arcteryx). For heavier weather I have a Gill offshore hooded jacket that is Gore-Tex lined and carries reflective tape. Interesting that there are similar characteristics in some of the clothing for cycling, skiing and sailing. Breathability, longer back panels, zippered vents. Anyone have a favourite brand or article of cycling clothing for colder weather? I’m going to need to investigate gloves.
I haven’t had to use them yet but I just got these and they seem pretty awesome. Guess we’ll see when the weather gets cold and wet. They’re not bulky, the palm area is grippy, the touchscreen capability is very good and the inside is velvety.
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bikeman242

Active Member
a base layer is key for me. I found one I can wear all day long in the winter. it keeps me warm but I don't over heat in it inside. my sister gets them cheap for me but I have gotten them at amazon

I wear the same 32 degrees clothing except they are way cheaper at Costco.
 

Marrduk24

New Member
Any good pant recommendations for an ebike? I generally ride around 20 -25 mph and even though it’s in 60s at the moment, it can feel chilly. Not looking forward to the temperature dropping to 40s and lower.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I do a base layer of Patagonia capelene with a merino 1/4 zip sweater and a goretex cycling jacket with reflective material. If it gets colder than 40 and is dry then a Patagonia puff jacket over the sweater. In the I wear a pair of Gill Helmsmen sailing gloves and add a liner when it is really cold. A pair of thermal big tights with padding with merino long johns when it gets really cold, A balaclava for keeping the wind off my face and a Giro helmet with drop down visor and padded ear coverings completes the outfit.
 

fooferdoggie

Well-Known Member
I wear the same 32 degrees clothing except they are way cheaper at Costco.
ya thats where my sister gets them. so far they work the best I have like 9 pair so I can wear one a day. usually for work I put a poly/cotton long sleeve tee one it to work in then a sports hoody and a good goretex cycling coat.if it is below 32 I may need another shirt. jones are fine down to about 32 or a bit higher. then my feet need electric socks. a couple balaclavas work down to really cold. but my hands when it gets below 45 I have to wear electric gloves I cant find anything that keeps my hands warm otherwise.
 

Deacon Blues

Well-Known Member
Once it gets colder I switch to a thin, long sleeve Merino wool T-shirt. The colder it gets the more thin layers I add.

I have a pair of thin (full-leg) cycling pants for cooler Autumn riding and a pair of thicker (full-leg) cycling pants for really cold days. When the temperature gets close to freezing I stop riding.

Dallant, I might try a pair of those gloves.
 

ki11a

Active Member
It doesnt get TOO cold down here in Florida, but when it does...I have these awesome Ozero Touchscreen Windproof Bike Glove. They are velvety inside and have a great grippy texture on the outside + they also have touchscreen capabilities. Pretty great buy for 16 bucks.

Ive never really had to get any gloves before I started riding. But when it gets a bit cold the wind hits you something different in the hands and wrists.
 
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fooferdoggie

Well-Known Member
It doesnt get TOO cold down here in Florida, but when it does...I have these awesome Ozero Touchscreen Windproof Bike Glove. They are velvety inside and have a great grippy texture on the outside + they also have touchscreen capabilities. Pretty great buy for 16 bucks.

Ive never really had to get any gloves before I started riding. But when it gets a bit cold the wind hits you something different in the hands and wrists.
Florida thats not cold your just a wimp (G)
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Once it gets colder I switch to a thin, long sleeve Merino wool T-shirt. The colder it gets the more thin layers I add.

I have a pair of thin (full-leg) cycling pants for cooler Autumn riding and a pair of thicker (full-leg) cycling pants for really cold days. When the temperature gets close to freezing I stop riding.

Dallant, I might try a pair of those gloves.
Let me know what you think of them. I just bought a pair of waterproof Columbia pants...long for me but I’m hoping they’ll work well.
 

Hectors Ghost

Active Member
Moisture-wicking base layer... underwear, long sleeve shirt, gator. Wool shirt, leggings, socks, maybe glove liners. Puffy jacket, rain skin (w/great hood & pit-zips), thermal vest, and rain pants. Riding pants. A couple of sets of great water-proof gloves. Knee-high Uniroyal rubber boots, with short/calf/knee-high wool socks. Every piece of clothing I have can be worn alone or as an added layer. This gets me through fall and winter rain or snow.
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
If you use diving gloves make sure you wear some type of moisture-absorbing liners with them. The best waterproof gloves I have used for riding are Sealskinz.
FYI the ones I mentioned aren’t diving gloves. I’ve had neoprene gloves and I second a moisture absorbing layer.
 

dmark

Member
I wear body armor (shirt and pants) with just a nylon shell over top (Buy a size larger so it will fit over the armor).

The armor will keep you warm, and I still have a frozen shoulder from the fracture I sustained slipping on ice in just an abrasion shirt (Hard armor is better).


I find the coldest parts are hands and feet, so I wear Savior electric gloves and sometimes electric socks too.


If I wear the electric socks, I can wear lighter boots like Blundstones or Redbacks, but if I wear regular socks, I sometimes wear LLBean Snowsneakers instead.

If I want full head protection on a cold day, I wear a Ski-doo helmet with anti-fog, like BV2S or Modular3.
 

Latitude

Well-Known Member
Staying dry is the most important thing for me. If I can stay dry I can ride to sub-freezing temps... I don't like it always, but I do it.

Couldn’t agree more. I wore foul weather gear racing on sailboats before GoreTex was generally available, and the bib overalls and overcoats were nearly as good at keeping moisture in as they were at keeping rain and spray out. It was impossible to stay warm and comfortable long-term with them. GoreTex was a game changer. It allowed much lighter clothing to keep you warm. I have raced 220 miles on my boat from Port Huron to Mackinac Island in one of the roughest races on record (2008), beating into 10 ft+ waves. When I went below to try to get some rest and peeled off my foul weather gear, I was still comfortable.

Sorry it’s off-topic, but story below if you’re interested.

 
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