Como 4.0 Brake Pads

Nwr2339

Member
So I'm a moron and sprayed my brakes with brake parts cleaner which apparently was an oil based one because now after cleaning my bike to look like new the brakes squeal horribly. Cleaned all I could with alcohol but they still sound just as bad.

My question, is it really required to remove the wheel or can I just pull the caliper off and remove the pads that way to clean them? Looks to me like I can simply pull two bolts and the caliper would pull off the frame and rotor just like on a car leaving me access to remove the pads. I seen one video where a guy did it that way but all the others show the wheel being removed. Any insight from the group?
 

Nxkharra

Well-Known Member
So I'm a moron and sprayed my brakes with brake parts cleaner which apparently was an oil based one because now after cleaning my bike to look like new the brakes squeal horribly. Cleaned all I could with alcohol but they still sound just as bad.

My question, is it really required to remove the wheel or can I just pull the caliper off and remove the pads that way to clean them? Looks to me like I can simply pull two bolts and the caliper would pull off the frame and rotor just like on a car leaving me access to remove the pads. I seen one video where a guy did it that way but all the others show the wheel being removed. Any insight from the group?
I did that for the first time. Took the wheels off. After changing the pads I had to make adjustment and realized I could have done that without taking the wheels off.
 

Nwr2339

Member
I did that for the first time. Took the wheels off. After changing the pads I had to make adjustment and realized I could have done that without taking the wheels off.

That was my thought. Remove the two bolts to take off the caliper. Remove and clean the pads. Place pads back in. put caliper back in place with bolts a bit loose. Pull brake to square caliper and then tighten the bolts. Seems easier to me but i'm a big time bike noob and wasn't sure. Even the Bike store said remove the wheel for the process (or use a pipe cleaner/plastic tooth pick to scrub while assembled.
 
B

BarryS

Guest
So I'm a moron and sprayed my brakes with brake parts cleaner which apparently was an oil based one because now after cleaning my bike to look like new the brakes squeal horribly. Cleaned all I could with alcohol but they still sound just as bad.

My question, is it really required to remove the wheel or can I just pull the caliper off and remove the pads that way to clean them? Looks to me like I can simply pull two bolts and the caliper would pull off the frame and rotor just like on a car leaving me access to remove the pads. I seen one video where a guy did it that way but all the others show the wheel being removed. Any insight from the group?
When you say Alcohol was it denatured ? Did you clean the Rotors as well ? Us a small q-tip t apply : If possible some compressed air : Likely it's also on teh rotor : I just soap those down good : Since the Denatured stuff leaves water spots if you don't rinse shiny or painted parts right away :
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
So I'm a moron and sprayed my brakes with brake parts cleaner which apparently was an oil based one because now after cleaning my bike to look like new the brakes squeal horribly. Cleaned all I could with alcohol but they still sound just as bad.

My question, is it really required to remove the wheel or can I just pull the caliper off and remove the pads that way to clean them? Looks to me like I can simply pull two bolts and the caliper would pull off the frame and rotor just like on a car leaving me access to remove the pads. I seen one video where a guy did it that way but all the others show the wheel being removed. Any insight from the group?
If you are just removing the pads to clean and reinstalling the same set, there's no need to remove the wheel or the caliper. Some disc brakes use a machine screw, some a cotter pin to hold the pads in the caliper. Remove that pin/screw and pull the pads and spring out.

The reason to remove the wheel when replacing pads is because hydraulic brakes automatically adjust to be close to the rotor (disc). New pads are usually too thick to fit where the used pads were. So when replacing you need more space. There's a specific process to open that gap when replacing. No need to do that to remove and clean pads.
 

Nwr2339

Member
When you say Alcohol was it denatured ? Did you clean the Rotors as well ? Us a small q-tip t apply : If possible some compressed air : Likely it's also on teh rotor : I just soap those down good : Since the Denatured stuff leaves water spots if you don't rinse shiny or painted parts right away :

Rotors are clean. Cleaned them with fresh microfiber cloth and the Alcohol (not sure if it was denatured). pads are really new (310 miles) and no issues until i cleaned the bike so at this point i'm sure its the pads that got contaminated.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Nevada City, CA & Paradise Valley, AZ
Rotors are clean. Cleaned them with fresh microfiber cloth and the Alcohol (not sure if it was denatured). pads are really new (310 miles) and no issues until i cleaned the bike so at this point i'm sure its the pads that got contaminated.
Alcohol won't remove hydrocarbons, i.e. brake cleaner. I always clean my rotors and pads with acetone to remove hydrocarbons and alcohol for road grime.

If your Como is like my Vado your pads are organic. These softer pads can absorb oil so do a light sanding after cleaning to cut through the top surface and then clean again. If the brakes still squeal you best bet is new pads.

BTW - I avoid using any sprays near my calipers or rotors to minimize the chance of contamination. I'll spray a cleaner into a rag and then wipe near the brake parts instead.
 

Nwr2339

Member
If you are just removing the pads to clean and reinstalling the same set, there's no need to remove the wheel or the caliper. Some disc brakes use a machine screw, some a cotter pin to hold the pads in the caliper. Remove that pin/screw and pull the pads and spring out.

The reason to remove the wheel when replacing pads is because hydraulic brakes automatically adjust to be close to the rotor (disc). New pads are usually too thick to fit where the used pads were. So when replacing you need more space. There's a specific process to open that gap when replacing. No need to do that to remove and clean pads.

I'll have to take a look after work. I was thinking they had to come out through the bottom of the caliper and not the top meaning I would have to at least remove the caliper...but maybe not. Maybe at lunch i'll go down and try to remove by just removing the pin and sliding them out.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Nevada City, CA & Paradise Valley, AZ
I'll have to take a look after work. I was thinking they had to come out through the bottom of the caliper and not the top meaning I would have to at least remove the caliper...but maybe not. Maybe at lunch i'll go down and try to remove by just removing the pin and sliding them out.
Best not to remove the caliper. It'll avoid having to adjust it for pad rotor clearance later.
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I'll have to take a look after work. I was thinking they had to come out through the bottom of the caliper and not the top meaning I would have to at least remove the caliper...but maybe not. Maybe at lunch i'll go down and try to remove by just removing the pin and sliding them out.
They'll come right out. A pair of needle nose pliers is helpful due to space, not because it's stuck or difficult. Make sure you don't squeeze the brake handle while pads are out. Even flexing the brake line is not a good idea.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Nevada City, CA & Paradise Valley, AZ
Some brake calipers require that the pads be removed from the bottom of the caliper. If this is the case here removing the caliper is the hard way to go. It's easier to pull the wheel and then the pads leaving the caliper in place. No 'twiddling' with the caliper to get the correct pad to rotor clearances!

The Como 4 webpage reports that they have Shimano BR-MT200 brakes, correct? This pad replacement video indicates that these pads do come out the bottom of the caliper. This video leaves the caliper in place and pulls the wheel to work on the pads.

BTW - If you end having to replace the pads I'd suggest this Park Tool article. It might be helpful, esp in regards to resetting the pistons.
 

Marcela

Well-Known Member
What I would do is clean everything with pure alcohol. Especially the pads if you doused them with the brake cleaner or ether (starting fluid) which also has the oil, pure alcohol shouldn't harm them. Then you will need to reapply a new coating of brake material to the rotor by bedding it into the rotor. This is what the pads grip, not the rotor, they put down a coating of pad material on the rotor. The reason people get the squeal or whatever is because they haven't bedded the pads into the rotor. So what you need to do is put some heat into your pads/rotors so the pads will apply material to the rotors. Hard to do when there is oil on the parts. Reason you don't want to use new pads with new rotors. Always preferred to change one or the other out, not both. And changing pad material can have the same effect if the previous pad material is not compatible with whatever you are going to use.

But hey, everything is clean right?:)
 

Nwr2339

Member
What I would do is clean everything with pure alcohol. Especially the pads if you doused them with the brake cleaner or ether (starting fluid) which also has the oil, pure alcohol shouldn't harm them. Then you will need to reapply a new coating of brake material to the rotor by bedding it into the rotor. This is what the pads grip, not the rotor, they put down a coating of pad material on the rotor. The reason people get the squeal or whatever is because they haven't bedded the pads into the rotor. So what you need to do is put some heat into your pads/rotors so the pads will apply material to the rotors. Hard to do when there is oil on the parts. Reason you don't want to use new pads with new rotors. Always preferred to change one or the other out, not both. And changing pad material can have the same effect if the previous pad material is not compatible with whatever you are going to use.

But hey, everything is clean right?:)
Some brake calipers require that the pads be removed from the bottom of the caliper. If this is the case here removing the caliper is the hard way to go. It's easier to pull the wheel and then the pads leaving the caliper in place. No 'twiddling' with the caliper to get the correct pad to rotor clearances!

The Como 4 webpage reports that they have Shimano BR-MT200 brakes, correct? This pad replacement video indicates that these pads do come out the bottom of the caliper. This video leaves the caliper in place and pulls the wheel to work on the pads.

BTW - If you end having to replace the pads I'd suggest this Park Tool article. It might be helpful, esp in regards to resetting the pistons.


I was already one in when I read the advice not to and just remove the wheel. Everything seemed fine, got the calipers aligned with rotor dead center easy enough but now both still squeak and I have no braking power in the rear. Don't have time now cause of work but I don't know what to do. The brake material seems plausible for the squeaking but I don't quite understand why I lost braking power. Going to wipe the rotors down again with alcohol to try and alleviate the squeak but they should have been pristine (minus plausible brake material.) Not sure about the lack of braking power. Maybe i'll just take the damn thing to the bike shop
 

TS25

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
If you are just removing the pads to clean and reinstalling the same set, there's no need to remove the wheel or the caliper. Some disc brakes use a machine screw, some a cotter pin to hold the pads in the caliper. Remove that pin/screw and pull the pads and spring out.

Some brake calipers require that the pads be removed from the bottom of the caliper. If this is the case here removing the caliper is the hard way to go. It's easier to pull the wheel and then the pads leaving the caliper in place. No 'twiddling' with the caliper to get the correct pad to rotor clearances!

The Como 4 webpage reports that they have Shimano BR-MT200 brakes, correct? This pad replacement video indicates that these pads do come out the bottom of the caliper. This video leaves the caliper in place and pulls the wheel to work on the pads.

The BR-MT200 brake caliper works the same as my BR-MT500, using a cotter pin system. You need to remove the wheel to take the brake pads out, no other way to do it (because you should leave the brake caliper in place as @Sierratim has told).

Brake pads for this brake are so cheap I wouldn't make any fuss about cleaning them after contamination with an oily substance. Alcohol is not sufficiant for that.

Just mount new brake pads and bike on.
 

Nwr2339

Member
The BR-MT200 brake caliper works the same as my BR-MT500, using a cotter pin system. You need to remove the wheel to take the brake pads out, no other way to do it (because you should leave the brake caliper in place as @Sierratim has told).

Brake pads for this brake are so cheap I wouldn't make any fuss about cleaning them after contamination with an oily substance. Alcohol is not sufficiant for that.

Just mount new brake pads and bike on.

Going to take it to the bike shop later today. Something went wrong somewhere. I got the pads clean to where they looked like new with no visible glaze by using a bit of sand paper and alcohol. but maybe they are still saturated to the point I can't see. And I still have no idea why the stopping power is gone in the rear. I'll watch the shop fix it and i'll be able to figure it out if it happens again.