Como front suspension

Code54

Member
Has anyone added a front suspension fork to a Como? I was looking to add a fork to the wife's bike just for gravel roads and such so nothing fancy. Any suggestions on what I need or should look for? I was considering the Suntour that is on some of the models from the factory since it is very reasonable price but wanted to see what you all think?
Thanks
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
Has anyone added a front suspension fork to a Como? I was looking to add a fork to the wife's bike just for gravel roads and such so nothing fancy. Any suggestions on what I need or should look for? I was considering the Suntour that is on some of the models from the factory since it is very reasonable price but wanted to see what you all think?
Thanks
Sorry I haven't done it, but I know it can be done.
The European Como has a suspension fork stock, and while I was drooling over a picture of one on here, a member who is a Specialized dealer mentioned doing one in his shop. That member Brandon? doesn't seem to be active anymore.
So all I can do is keep your thread open for a bit until someone knowledgeable shows up.
 

Code54

Member
Thanks - it looks fairly simple, just need to get the shock but want to make sure I get the geometry correct.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
Thanks - it looks fairly simple, just need to get the shock but want to make sure I get the geometry correct.
Absolutely true. The geometry is a big part of what you get ( and pay for) from Specialized. Perhaps check to see what Specialized uses on the EU version and good luck to you.
Report back please, I may want to have the same modification made once mine is out of warranty...
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Mazovia, Poland
I sometimes have a hard time to understand why someone riding an e-bike on 2.4" tyres on pavement ever needs a suspension fork... To make the e-bike even heavier? Reducing tyre pressure makes miracles.
Just a loose remark.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
I sometimes have a hard time to understand why someone riding an e-bike on 2.4" tyres on pavement ever needs a suspension fork... To make the e-bike even heavier? Reducing tyre pressure makes miracles.
Just a loose remark.
Yeah, the additional weight is an issue. Especially since the only time it would likely get used is downhill on rough surfaces.

But I do exactly that at the beginning of almost every ride to avoid the 45 mph highway into town that's my only other route down the mountain ... unless I drive and carry the bikes that way.

Haven't dropped this bike yet from all the bouncing around yet though...Good brakes help a lot.
 

Code54

Member
We ride gravel roads a lot and some of the "bike trails" we ride are rough due to roots lifting the asphalt or the dirt below the trails heaving and causing 3"-4" peeks ( think asphalt in this shape ^ ) so the fork take the impact out where the tire just doesn't have that much to give. If you ride a "normal" road maybe you wont notice it but even the road I live off of has some spots that are rougher than some mountain bike trails I been on. The weight really doesnt matter - what am I adding maybe a pound to my wife's bike with a fork? If it is 51 or 52 pounds you are not going to notice any real difference at that point. That is sort of like worrying if the ride is150 or 151 lbs, doesn't really change much in my opinion. Now if it makes the ride just a bit more comfortable for her I figure why not do it? My E-carbon gravel bike has a front fork and is under 40lbs and I love it and wont go back to a gravel bike without a front fork for where we ride. It may seem odd to some but until you try it, I think it maybe hard to fully understand the advantages.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
We ride gravel roads a lot and some of the "bike trails" we ride are rough due to roots lifting the asphalt or the dirt below the trails heaving and causing 3"-4" peeks ( think asphalt in this shape ^ ) so the fork take the impact out where the tire just doesn't have that much to give. If you ride a "normal" road maybe you wont notice it but even the road I live off of has some spots that are rougher than some mountain bike trails I been on. The weight really doesnt matter - what am I adding maybe a pound to my wife's bike with a fork? If it is 51 or 52 pounds you are not going to notice any real difference at that point. That is sort of like worrying if the ride is150 or 151 lbs, doesn't really change much in my opinion. Now if it makes the ride just a bit more comfortable for her I figure why not do it? My E-carbon gravel bike has a front fork and is under 40lbs and I love it and wont go back to a gravel bike without a front fork for where we ride. It may seem odd to some but until you try it, I think it maybe hard to fully understand the advantages.
Stefan is a roadie in a flat part of the world, and has a mountain bike for off road adventures. I have one bike for all surfaces. 😄
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Mazovia, Poland
and has a mountain bike for off road adventures.
Not anymore. My both Specialized e-bikes have rigid forks. And I ride so called "gravel", that is, Pavement + Gravel + Off-Road.

The "big" Vado has 2" tyres, that's a plenty. Additionally, the ride is softened with a Baramind BAM Trek suspension handlebars and a Kinekt 2.1 suspension seat-post.
Gravel cyclists use no suspension. My Vado SL rides on 38 mm (narrow) tyres (the size appropriate for the discipline). I have dramatically softened my SL rides with the full Redshift ShockStop suspension system (suspension stem and seat-post).
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
Not anymore. My both Specialized e-bikes have rigid forks. And I ride so called "gravel", that is, Pavement + Gravel + Off-Road.

The "big" Vado has 2" tyres, that's a plenty. Additionally, the ride is softened with a Baramind BAM Trek suspension handlebars and a Kinekt 2.1 suspension seat-post.
Gravel cyclists use no suspension. My Vado SL rides on 38 mm (narrow) tyres (the size appropriate for the discipline). I have dramatically softened my SL rides with the full Redshift ShockStop suspension system (suspension stem and seat-post).
I didn't know you were down to only two bikes. Be careful about that N - 1 spiral, my friend.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Mazovia, Poland
Art, there's one thing I need to mention. The Full Suspension it to maintain traction in very rough terrain. The soft ride of an e-MTB is ensured with wide, lowly inflated tyres.

One of my biggest disappointments related to Tero 3.0 was the cheap and heavy Suntour suspension fork. It was so hopeless that I swear my Redshift stem is much softer than the Suntour suspension fork. If I were to buy a Tero, I would spend a lot to get the 5.0 with a decent air suspension fork.
I didn't know you were down to only two bikes. Be careful about that N - 1 spiral, my friend.
My home is partially damaged by fire, making it hard for me to find a storage space. The Trance E+ belongs to Jacek now, and I lent my Lovelec to Darek H, a friend. You would not believe how much the maintenance cost dropped with N-2! :)
 

Brendon@OEB

Well-Known Member
Has anyone added a front suspension fork to a Como? I was looking to add a fork to the wife's bike just for gravel roads and such so nothing fancy. Any suggestions on what I need or should look for? I was considering the Suntour that is on some of the models from the factory since it is very reasonable price but wanted to see what you all think?
Thanks

I haven't personally added a suspension fork to a Como but I have made a Vado into a rigid front end. In the EU the Como can be equipped with Vado 700c wheels and front suspension, the components on the bikes are fairly interchangeable. For instance you can run 27.5 wheels on the Vado (which is what I do in the winter for studded tires) or you can put more road oriented 700c Vado wheels onto a Como (mind the fender clearance).

For suspension fork on Como, I believe it's a straight 1 1/8" steer, you'll want to note the steerer length of the stock fork, the axle-crown measurement, and offset (if you can). You'll want to keep things as close to stock as possible.

Worth noting, while you can decrease tire pressure for more comfort but you sacrafice effeciency, AKA range should that be a concern. By adding suspension you can keep the rider comfort and keep the rolling effeciency with a small weight penalty which can be negligible depending on where you're riding.
 

Brendon@OEB

Well-Known Member
What he said . Hope you are doing well !
Thanks! Doing well, an owner over at Oregon E-Bikes. While we don't have Specialized (been working on it, but there's another dealer too close) I've still got my Vado and all the diagnostic hardware. Unfortunately I no longer have access to the dealer site so I can't even update the software on my own personal bike :(
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
Thanks! Doing well, an owner over at Oregon E-Bikes. While we don't have Specialized (been working on it, but there's another dealer too close) I've still got my Vado and all the diagnostic hardware. Unfortunately I no longer have access to the dealer site so I can't even update the software on my own personal bike :(
So you are now in the same situation as the rest of us.
I'm not sure a Specialized dealership is a great place to be right now until they get things sorted with the DTC side, but good to hear from you.
 

Brendon@OEB

Well-Known Member
So you are now in the same situation as the rest of us.
I'm not sure a Specialized dealership is a great place to be right now until they get things sorted with the DTC side, but good to hear from you.
Yeah, that's a wild move for sure! We have a very strong e-commerce model as well as brick and mortar to give folks either a purely online experience, hybrid of click and collect, or more traditional in person experience. While we'd love to add Specialized to that fold (local dealer here doesn't have a showroom and is more MTB focused, their restrictions on e-commerce are impeding in terms of a small local bike shop trying to compete with larger online companies.
 

Code54

Member
I haven't personally added a suspension fork to a Como but I have made a Vado into a rigid front end. In the EU the Como can be equipped with Vado 700c wheels and front suspension, the components on the bikes are fairly interchangeable. For instance you can run 27.5 wheels on the Vado (which is what I do in the winter for studded tires) or you can put more road oriented 700c Vado wheels onto a Como (mind the fender clearance).

For suspension fork on Como, I believe it's a straight 1 1/8" steer, you'll want to note the steerer length of the stock fork, the axle-crown measurement, and offset (if you can). You'll want to keep things as close to stock as possible.

Worth noting, while you can decrease tire pressure for more comfort but you sacrafice effeciency, AKA range should that be a concern. By adding suspension you can keep the rider comfort and keep the rolling effeciency with a small weight penalty which can be negligible depending on where you're riding.
Thank you !!!!!