Comparing ebikes to buy

Sharonlasser

New Member
I am 69 years old, considering my first ebike. I am fit, but need a little help riding and I want to ride further and get stronger. I am considering a pedego interceptor, a gazelle easy flow or arroyo, or evelo galaxy 500. Any advice?
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
I'm 68 and highly recommend eBiking. Nearing my 12,000 mile mark of eBike riding that I started in spring 2016. But I have no experience with any of those bikes.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Young folks, such as yourself, are moving more and more to ebikes!

Like rich c, I don't have much direct experience to share re the brands you've mentioned other than to say we did look at Pedego bikes but found them lacking for the price; one of the heaviest ebikes, throttle controlled hub motors, mechanical disc brakes, 7-speed derailleur gearing, etc.

The other brands you've mentioned have mid-drive motors that in the case of the Shimano STEPS motors use torque sensing for motor control. I'm not sure about the Dapu motor in the Evelo bike, but the Shimano system is reported to be smooth and well developed. Our current ebikes have mid-drive motors that are competitive with the Shimano system. They perform very well.

The Gazelle bikes use hydraulic rim brakes. They do stop well but use special pads. I prefer the hydraulic disc brakes like Evelo uses.

The hub gearing for the Gazelle and Evelo bikes is considered superior by many with the Evelo's belt drive being considered top of the line.

Lots of trade offs, I know.

To me a major consideration beyond the specs is being able to do test rides. Evelo is a mail order company. For me this is an issue. That leaves Gazelle as the brand worth the most serious consideration IMHO. Personally, I would give the Gazelle Ultimate T10 a close look. It's in your $3K-$4K price range, is a low step thru, has the Bosch Performance Line higher torque (65Nm) mid-drive motor, features hydraulic disc brakes, Shimano XT 10-speed gearing, fenders, lights, rear rack, etc, etc. I'd still test ride it, but this bike has a lot to like.

Happy shopping, and Ride On!
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
I am 69 years old, considering my first ebike. I am fit, but need a little help riding and I want to ride further and get stronger.

I am considering a pedego interceptor, a gazelle easy flow or arroyo, or evelo galaxy 500. Any advice?

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Cycledoc

New Member
I'm 79 with medical issues that affected my range on my road bike. Went with a Gazelle t10 and enjoying it immensely. Nice having a dealer to answer questions and help if there are problems-- none in first thousand miles. Try them!
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
I am 69 years old, considering my first ebike. I am fit, but need a little help riding and I want to ride further and get stronger. I am considering a pedego interceptor, a gazelle easy flow or arroyo, or evelo galaxy 500. Any advice?
So I see that you're looking for a step thru, any other criteria?

Do you prefer mid drive or hub drive? It seems like you don't really have preference as long as it's a step thru?
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Much of the advice you get on forums is not in your interest. Most people are trying to justify their own choices by urging you to buy what they bought. Whatever you do, don't listen to anyone who tells you not to listen to the advice of others...Hah, I guess that eliminates me ;)

The best thing you can do is be as precise as you can about how often and under what conditions you think you are going to ride. This will help a knowledgeable dealer guide you to a bike that will serve you best.

If you are like most of us you will ride your ebike more often and further than you ever imagined possible. Spending more money on a better built, safer, more reliable bike will be one of the best decisions you ever made. And I suspect I am not alone in that once I got going with my first ebike, I discovered latent capabilities within myself that lead down the road to longer. more athletic, endurance riding, something that never occurred to me going into it. Buying a better, more versatile bike at first kept me riding longer till I could afford the kind of bike that I eventually learned would be right for me. That process took over a year in.

Add a grain of salt to the advice you get here. Some of it can be quite good and well informed but there are occasionally shills hiding in the corners, promoting their new brand. And then there is the fact that individuals riders often exhibit confirmation bias in their comments just wanting to give them affirmation for their choices.

Do it your self/retrofit guys can't imagine why someone would spend good money on a manufactured bike from the ground up ebike. Fans of low priced, Chinese made, hub motor bikes would not be caught dead on center drive bikes. Fans of German made equipment really don;t hardly bother looking at bikes from other countries. Some people will never even look at a bike without a throttle, while other would never have a bike with one. fans of a particular brand will insist the one they chose is the only one to buy.

If you are like most riders, you are not a mechanic, don't have the know how, tools, time or interest in converting a bike to an ebike or maintaining your production bike. Some of us live for this stuff others just want to ride. Most will need help from a local bike shop. Don't expect people at that shop to care about keeping your bike running smoothly if you bought a bike on line.

The only support you will get from an on line seller, if you are lucky, is phone help to diagnose the problem and they send you parts to replace yourself or you will pay a local shop to replace for you.

If you decide that building out an ebike is not for you, it is likely best to spend a little more and have a dedicated local shop standing behind the sale in who's interest it is to keep you happy and rolling along.

The most common comment I have heard from new ebike owners is almost always something like: "I never imagined I would be riding a bike this often or this far" Buying a cheaper, mass produced bike may or may not give you the same quality of "whoopee!!" experience that boosts you right into an enthusiastic embrace of ebiking.

All too often people who buy lesser bikes seem to arrive at regrets sooner because the bike's inherent limitations just never quite enabled it to do what they want. Personally I ended up spending way more than I initially thought I would or should. Given how much time I now spend on my bike, something I never could have imagined, I am glad I spent what I did and got a bike I can count on, that enhances my enjoyment every time I ride it.

My advice: Make an honest assessment as to how you will be riding, road or trails, easy grades or mountain trails, commuting, exercise/fitness or touring. Take your time but don't get bogged down in research paralysis. Test ride lots of bikes until you find the one that puts the biggest grin on your face and the people selling it you like the best. Then, if you can possibly afford it, pay more than you first thought you were willing to spend. The pain of paying out some more money wears off quickly. The joy of riding a bike that really suits you will endure long into the future every time you saddle up.
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Unless you’re capable and interested in taking the chance to build your own, I suggest looking for a well-known brand from a good local-to-you bike shop who you trust. At some point you will likely need help/service and many local shops don't have the time or inclination to work on ebikes they didn’t sell.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Unless you’re capable and interested in taking the chance to build your own, I suggest looking for a well-known brand from a good local-to-you bike shop who you trust. At some point you will likely need help/service and many local shops don't have the time or inclination to work on ebikes they didn’t sell.
Not disagreeing, just a counterpoint. Some of us really enjoy working on our own bikes - among other things. DIY is something that comes naturally. If you are generally a DIY'er by nature, there's no degree in rocket science required to work on your own e-bike. A lot of help for DIY'ers available right here, as well as on YouTube.

My point is this. You need to make this "I need/prefer a local shop" vs. "I am a DIY'er" call very early on when making a buying decision. It will very often define which bikes you should be looking at. There is no point looking at bikes that are sold direct if you are not willing and able to get your hands dirty.

There's one exception to that thought, and that's the availability of a mobile service that will assemble and service your bike for you. For info, check out velofix.com
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
I used Yelp and found 2 mobile bike services that will come to the house. Knock on wood, I haven't had to use them yet, but I have been able to change a front flat, inject slime, change out handlebars and pedal exenders, clean and lube chain and add many accessories. I agree, it's not rocket science and most all mods and fixes are supported by a Youtube video that will walk you thought step by step...
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
One tid-bit from our experiences with DIY ebike conversions and recent ebike purchases from the LBS, get the bigger battery. Neither one of us has ever said, "Gee, I wish I had the smaller battery". Side benefit, when you do decide to go on that inevitable longer distance adventure ride, you can borrow your wife's battery for your backup...🤣
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Not disagreeing, just a counterpoint. Some of us really enjoy working on our own bikes - among other things. DIY is something that comes naturally. If you are generally a DIY'er by nature, there's no degree in rocket science required to work on your own e-bike. A lot of help for DIY'ers available right here, as well as on YouTube.

My point is this. You need to make this "I need/prefer a local shop" vs. "I am a DIY'er" call very early on when making a buying decision. It will very often define which bikes you should be looking at. There is no point looking at bikes that are sold direct if you are not willing and able to get your hands dirty.

There's one exception to that thought, and that's the availability of a mobile service that will assemble and service your bike for you. For info, check out velofix.com
It’s far more than just getting your hands dirty with ebikes. Proprietary parts, updates, access to electrical/technical know how, warranty issues, etc. are all part of the ebike ownership equation. I get my hands dirty but am unwilling and (more than likely) unable to dive into anything electrically oriented. Others have no issue with that part of the equation.
And as much as I respect this forum, there are ebike ownership issues nobody here can really help you with like your local shop can.
 

Latitude

Well-Known Member
Some very good advice here. I still have an older hub-drive Schwinn e-bike in the garage that is frankly a piece of junk that didn’t last a year. That informed me to look at a name brand production bike when I finally got serious and did some research. And I did pay more than I initially thought I would, but as others have noted, you will ride the e-bike far more than you expected to. I’m very happy with my choice at 4000 km. and with the dealer support I receive.
I do like to be able to service my bike myself too, because it interests me and I am 1 1/2 hours from my dealer. I am confining myself to messing with the chain, cassette, tires, etc... things that wear (and are not electrical). Being able to do some preventative maintenance helps components last longer. And as I got to know the bike, I switched out some components for others that suit my riding style better.
Good luck in your choice of a bike. Jump in and enjoy the ride!