Converting to Electronic Shifting

SMeBikers

Member
Region
USA
City
Santa Monica
It's the same with the Android app too. It seems the shifter can only pair with one device at a time, either a phone app or the handlebar controls. If you follow the instructions in the manual you're OK. It even says at the top of page 10, in bold, caps to pair to the app BEFORE installing the handlebar controls. If all else fails, read the manual... 😸
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Northeast Pennsylvania
It's the same with the Android app too. It seems the shifter can only pair with one device at a time, either a phone app or the handlebar controls. If you follow the instructions in the manual you're OK. It even says at the top of page 10, in bold, caps to pair to the app BEFORE installing the handlebar controls. If all else fails, read the manual... 😸
I'm glad Archer revised the manual. Mine has no page 10 and does not mention the dual pairing issue.
 

Deacon Blues

Well-Known Member
6zfshdb, how long does it take for your push button shifter to start working after your initial button press? Mine takes 10 to 15 seconds, which seems like a long time.
 

SMeBikers

Member
Region
USA
City
Santa Monica
I'm glad Archer revised the manual. Mine has no page 10 and does not mention the dual pairing issue.
That's weird, I only just bought it. If you mean the PDF on their site, I see what you mean. I was using the booklet that was in the box.
 

SMeBikers

Member
Region
USA
City
Santa Monica
6zfshdb, how long does it take for your push button shifter to start working after your initial button press? Mine takes 10 to 15 seconds, which seems like a long time.
Yes, that does seem like a long time! I just tested mine with the stopwatch on my Pixel. It was 2.7s for the shifter to be in pairing mode, then 3.4s for the handlebar control to pair. Huge margin of error due to the short timeframe but certainly not 15 seconds.

On the shifter, you need to push the button down until it clicks, which is somewhat painful for me. I have the softer touch handlebar control and just hold the button down for a few secs.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Northeast Pennsylvania
6zfshdb, how long does it take for your push button shifter to start working after your initial button press? Mine takes 10 to 15 seconds, which seems like a long time.
10 to 15 seconds is too long. My experience is similar to that described by SMeBikers above. Try calling Archer tech support.
 

FlyingScot

New Member
Region
United Kingdom
City
Motherwell
LOOKS good though, I think I will go with the SRAM wireless system if or when I change to a SRAM 12 speed cassette

That shift button looks a bit rubbish looking and unattractive to my eyes, looks cheap and nasty compared to something like the Bosch remote display up and down buttons and yes it has to contain a battery and a wireless transmitter BUT looks clunky and hardly well integrated
 

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VoltMan99

Well-Known Member
Region
Asia
City
Tokyo
That shift button looks a bit rubbish looking and unattractive to my eyes, looks cheap and nasty compared to something like the Bosch remote display up and down buttons and yes it has to contain a battery and a wireless transmitter BUT looks clunky and hardly well integrated
At what additional cost do aesthetics trump value given equivalent functionality? SRAM requires a complete drivetrain swap perhaps?
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Northeast Pennsylvania
Sure, there are better, far more expensive electronic shifting systems available. I looked at SRAM but the cost to convert the drivetrain rivaled that of buying a new bike.

If you've got enough $$ to throw at the problem, hey, go for it!
 

FlyingScot

New Member
Region
United Kingdom
City
Motherwell
At what additional cost do aesthetics trump value given equivalent functionality? SRAM requires a complete drivetrain swap perhaps?


You could say the same for, why swap cables that have worked forever with batteries, switches and electric motors
 

FlyingScot

New Member
Region
United Kingdom
City
Motherwell
Sure, there are better, far more expensive electronic shifting systems available. I looked at SRAM but the cost to convert the drivetrain rivaled that of buying a new bike.

If you've got enough $$ to throw at the problem, hey, go for it!


Well since this is the E-Bike forum and in my world the cost E-Bikes that interest me are from around £3K to £6K your analogy does not hold water

Also you can now purchase the SRAM E-shift bits as you need them and don't need to buy a complete system with parts you don't really require

Doubly so with money in the bank doing nothing, why not spend that on things that you want that will make your life more enjoyable

All comes down to - Your Life Your Choices
 

Deacon Blues

Well-Known Member
I have an Archer electronic shifter on my e-gravel bike and I'm happy with my purchase. I'd give it a score of 8/10. I think it takes too long for the shifter to become operational after one of the shifter buttons is pressed and I've had to make a couple of minor shifting adjustments (going to a larger cassette ring). I'm hoping it's now dialled in and won't need any more adjustments.
Honestly, it doesn't come close to shifting as nice as my road bike's Di2 groupset, but the Di2 is (in Canada) 3 or 4 times more expensive.

I have ordered a full suspension titanium commuter ebike from Watts Wagon and it will come with (hopefully) a SRAM AXS eTap groupset.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Northeast Pennsylvania
Well since this is the E-Bike forum and in my world the cost E-Bikes that interest me are from around £3K to £6K your analogy does not hold water

Also you can now purchase the SRAM E-shift bits as you need them and don't need to buy a complete system with parts you don't really require

Doubly so with money in the bank doing nothing, why not spend that on things that you want that will make your life more enjoyable

All comes down to - Your Life Your Choices
As I said, if you have the $$ to throw at the problem, by all means, go for it! I mean this sincerely with no disrespect intended.
 

SMeBikers

Member
Region
USA
City
Santa Monica
I was mildly interested in ebikes but put off by the cost, especially as we'd have to buy two. Then we did a biking tour in the wine country and they had RadCity bikes and I was hooked. My only concern was that it was painful to shift (I have arthritis in my thumbs from too many years on a keyboard). The tour guide recommended an electronic shifter and I found the Archer here.

The RadCity is only $1,599 so for around $3.5K we got two ebikes and I got an electronic shifter. That's an amount I was comfortable with for this project.
 

Elkman

Active Member
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I was looking at the various Creo models and some have electronic shifters as a feature. When I consider having to insure my smartphone is charged and my Wahoo is charged and my headset is charged and my bike battery is charged, the last thing I want is one more thing to charge. Getting to where I need a charging station for our bicycles and accessories.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Northeast Pennsylvania
I was looking at the various Creo models and some have electronic shifters as a feature. When I consider having to insure my smartphone is charged and my Wahoo is charged and my headset is charged and my bike battery is charged, the last thing I want is one more thing to charge. Getting to where I need a charging station for our bicycles and accessories.
I agree. There are already too many things to recharge on an e- bike. The days of just jumping on my old conventional Trek MTB without giving it a second thought are long gone. It should be noted though that after 800 miles using the Archer shifter, I'm still on the original charge. In my case, I'll only have to recharge 2 or maybe 3 times per season.

Unfortunately, we all have to find ways to deal with our infirmities as we age.
 

Deacon Blues

Well-Known Member
A weird thing happened with my Archer unit yesterday.
A couple of time in the past two rides I've had problems getting the unit to turn on. Both times it took multiple attempts to get the unit to power on and for the remote shifter to work.
Thinking maybe the battery in the main unit was getting low, so I took them out and put them on the charger.

A weird thing happened when I installed them back in the unit. As I was screwing in the cap that hold the batteries in place the light on the unit showed green, then went to red, and then went off as I fully screwed in the cap.
After that I couldn't power on the unit. I took out the batteries and went through the steps three times (yes, the batteries were loaded correctly), with the same results.
I emailed Archer but haven't heard back from them yet. Later on in the day I tried powering up the unit again and this time it worked.
Hopefully, Archer will get back to me and give me some feedback.

I'm going on a long ride tomorrow. Hopefully, I won't have any problems.
 

SMeBikers

Member
Region
USA
City
Santa Monica
A weird thing happened with my Archer unit yesterday.
A couple of time in the past two rides I've had problems getting the unit to turn on. Both times it took multiple attempts to get the unit to power on and for the remote shifter to work.
Thinking maybe the battery in the main unit was getting low, so I took them out and put them on the charger.

A weird thing happened when I installed them back in the unit. As I was screwing in the cap that hold the batteries in place the light on the unit showed green, then went to red, and then went off as I fully screwed in the cap.
After that I couldn't power on the unit. I took out the batteries and went through the steps three times (yes, the batteries were loaded correctly), with the same results.
I emailed Archer but haven't heard back from them yet. Later on in the day I tried powering up the unit again and this time it worked.
Hopefully, Archer will get back to me and give me some feedback.

I'm going on a long ride tomorrow. Hopefully, I won't have any problems.
Maybe the batteries are on the way out and not holding a charge?
 

Deacon Blues

Well-Known Member
The batteries seem to charge up fine, but while they were out I should have put a meter on them just to be sure.
 

john peck

Well-Known Member
At 74, I'm always on the lookout for products that will allow me to continue riding as long as possible. I sometimes get arthritis in my hands which makes it difficult and sometimes painful to shift gears on a standard cable actuated derailleur system. I've looked at electronic derailleur systems but they are expensive and are mostly for 11 speed or higher cassettes. My existing bike is an older 10 speed. To convert it to an 11 speed and add electronic shifting would cost almost as much as a new bike. I was actually considering going that route until I found this product from Archer Components:


The D1X Trail mounts to the chain stay or seat stay of almost any bike, electric or conventional that uses a derailleur. It works with any cassette up to 15 cogs. At close to $400, it isn't cheap but a lot more so than any other electronic shifting system. Considering Archer's no questions asked 30 day return policy and 2 year warranty, I decided to give it a try. I have to say, after using the product for almost 500 miles, I'm impressed! Installation took about a half hour with another 20 minutes devoted to fine tuning the adjustments. Once set, the D1X holds your adjustments perfectly even when the batteries are changed. Shifting is quick, smooth and more "positive" than any cable system I've used. The handlebar mounted remote comes in light or firm button actuation pressure and is a huge benefit for anyone with finger or hand issues.

I won't get into the details since most are well explained in the link above. I'll simply highlight a few points that aren't clear in the instructions.

In my case, I had to mount the shifter on the seat stay since there are cables & electrical connectors in the way on the chain stay. The cable supplied was too short so I had to buy a longer piece of Bowman cable.
View attachment 86487

Once installed, the shifter is adjusted using a free app available for Android or iPhone. Micro adjustments along with temporary "overshifting" make the shifting process as smooth as butter! One point that isn't clear in the instructions is, you need to pair the shifter with the app BEFORE pairing the remote. The app will not work when the shifter is paired with the remote.
View attachment 86493 View attachment 86494

The Bluetooth remote can be mounted on the left or right, which ever is more convenient. As a precaution, I moved the cable shifter mechanism out of the way temporarily and left the cable in place rather than remove them. That way, it could be easily reinstalled should something happen to the electronic shifter.
View attachment 86484 View attachment 86485 View attachment 86486

My only real complaint with the Archer D1X Trail is the way the batteries are installed. They are a snug fit in the shifter and it needs to be removed from the chain stay to change them. This is a tedious process and difficult to do on the road or trail. It is sometimes possible to remove the battery cover, lift the rear wheel and tap the side of the shifter. If you're lucky, the batteries will slide out but most of the time, they don't. I found a way to simplify the process by using a magnetic pick up tool to extract the batteries. I carry it in the spare battery kit that Archer sells for $15.
View attachment 86490 View attachment 86489 View attachment 86488

Changing the battery on the remote is almost as difficult. It is almost impossible to do without removing it from the bike. This requires carrying the proper size Torx wrench in your tool kit. The small Allen wrench needed to open the case and extra screws are part of the spare battery kit which is a recommended accessory.
View attachment 86491 View attachment 86492

The system operates for around 80 hours per charge which means the average rider won't have to change batteries more than a few times each season. As an example, the picture of the app battery meter above, taken after 300 miles of riding, shows them to be about half discharged. In this case, I rode around 50 miles on 6 different days during a 30 day period.

Is electronic shifting really necessary? I suppose it depends on your needs and abilities. Aside from it's ease of operation for those with health issues, the biggest advantage is the time saved having to constantly adjust your derailleur. Many riders aren't able to do this themselves and rely on a bike shop to do the work. Unlike cable actuated systems, the performance of electronic shifters does not change over time. There is no cable & shifter mechanism to clutter up the look of your handlebars.

Is it worth the money? In my case, yes but not everyone will agree.

I apologize if this post seems to be a product endorsement. In a way, I guess it is but aside from being a satisfied customer, I am in no way associated with Archer Components.
Soft foam grips have helped my hands a lot. I make my own from 1¨tubular pipe insulation. I´ve also
adopted a more relaxed grip when riding.