Copenhagen Wheel Thoughts

kmikz

New Member
I've been visiting their site for the past two months and it just says delivery in spring. End of March is spring to me...
 

Brambor

Well-Known Member
it really is pitiful to see the sluggish progress of the idea. by the time it really hits the shelves it will be obsolite. It, sort of , already is. ...
 

kmikz

New Member
I like the idea of just replacing the wheel and also the fact that it doesn't look like a special bike, making it less appealing to thieves in my opinion. But the season is starting and I really want to get on an ebike this summer.
 

Brambor

Well-Known Member
the Copenhagen wheel is an ok idea for flat city riding and shorter distances but then if the riding is flat why not just save the weight and get a nicely equipped lightweight hybrid without the weight and power management of an ebike. I'm not sure I follow what the Wheel market is.
 

kmikz

New Member
I have an 5 mile ride to work and I've gotten quite attached to my bike. Five miles is not much, but I would prefer to get to work not needing to change tshirts. I could go the DIY route, but I'm technically challenged and don't like the idea of all those cables and zip ties. Also the battery would be an eye sore if it's not integrated in the frame and something that would attract the attention of thieves (don't have bike parking options at work, just have to tie it to a lamp post on the street). Also like the phone integration, it makes for an interesting gadget and I'm a geek and an electric vehicle fan. 950 USD is not cheap, but it's not that expensive either and you get to be on the forefront of electric bike technology. That's why I'm waiting for the release and user reviews.
 

Brambor

Well-Known Member
yeah. I see you point but also realize that the assist you get from the copenhagen wheel is less than you get from a regular ebike. At least that is what I understand from reading and watching the reviews. This means that arriving at work without changing tshirts is not guaranteed. :)

My ride to work is 14 miles on a regular ebike and I do need to take a shower. The marketing slogans advertising no need for shower after riding an ebike are not entirely accurate. It might be true for my wife who says she never sweats , but it is not true for me ;-)
 

JoePah

Well-Known Member
Yeah i'm good with my 10 ride to work in Miami in the winter and spring.. Would like to ride to work in the summer without being soaking sweat!
 

travelfairy

New Member
Women don't sweat, they "glow" (so my grandmother told me).

The SuperPedestrian FB is still being vague but the natives are getting restless and starting to post grumpy comments. I must admit, I'm looking forward to it for my 7 mile commute. Of course, the hybrid I own is 21 speed so I need to buy a new bike, and on one hand I think "I should get a cheap commuter bike" and on the other I think "I should get a decent commute bike, so if the wheel doesn't work out I still have a cool bike", but that would mean I'd end up with a commuter bike (for a 7 mile one way trip) that cost more than my nice Trek road bike, upon which I'm expecting to spend far more time.

I'm paranoid enough about my Trek getting stolen that if I am too worried about my commute bike getting stolen to take it anywhere, it kind of defeats the purpose.

The Copenhagen wheel works with single, and 7-9 speed bikes. If anybody has any recommendations for something that would go with it, I'm all ears. I can't seem to find a good bike that everybody agrees upon (upright riding style).
 

kmikz

New Member
Bummer, I thought my 21 speed was good for converting. I saw in the pre-order form that they asked about gear selection and I thought it was about the rear hub, that it can have 7 or 9 cogs so I assumed my 21 speed was OK for converting. If I have to change my bike I might as well get an Easy Motion Evo.
 

AemerC

New Member
I must admit, I'm looking forward to it for my 7 mile commute. Of course, the hybrid I own is 21 speed so I need to buy a new bike, and on one hand I think "I should get a cheap commuter bike" and on the other I think "I should get a decent commute bike, so if the wheel doesn't work out I still have a cool bike", but that would mean I'd end up with a commuter bike (for a 7 mile one way trip) that cost more than my nice Trek road bike, upon which I'm expecting to spend far more time.

I was in a similar predicament. I've been riding the same bike for 18 years now (upgraded and maintained along the way so that only really the frame, forks and bars are original) and really like the fit of it. I didn't want to defile my trusty steed by adding an electric wheel so I went looking for a new bike to go with it instead. Ultimately, I bought a cheapish one that has the same measurements as the one I've been using for so long. Same handlebar height, same seat height, same distance from seat to bars, same bar width. The head tube angle is the only thing that is different between the two. I replaced a couple of the parts that will matter with higher end parts and ended up with a pretty good commuter bike for less than what I would have paid for a higher end bike. Maybe that's an option for you?
 

travellin

New Member
The Copenhagen Wheel is compatible with 7, 8, 9, and 10 speed cassettes. It can be used on bikes with front derailleurs, making it compatible with bikes that have 21 speeds, or 24 speeds, etc. Superpedestrian explains Copenhagen Wheel compatibility in their Support Center article: All Things Gears
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
The wheel could be just great, I just wonder if the idea was just a little ahead of technology? Can you imagine how big the market would be for this product if the specs were 15-18mph, 25-30 mile range, all wheel sizes (any bike mount) and all for $499.99. I'll take two! This Wheel's success will all hinge on battery affordability and technology, lets hope they can hang around to take advantage of what's in the pipeline.
 

JoePah

Well-Known Member
The wheel could be just great, I just wonder if the idea was just a little ahead of technology? Can you imagine how big the market would be for this product if the specs were 15-18mph, 25-30 mile range, all wheel sizes (any bike mount) and all for $499.99. I'll take two! This Wheel's success will all hinge on battery affordability and technology, lets hope they can hang around to take advantage of what's in the pipeline.

The all in one wheel might get there in a few years.. In fact the Original FlyKly promised 20 mph, 36v10ah battery, 9 lbs, 1000 charge cycles. .. All for $599 including shipping!

I called their BS about a year and half ago, telling them there was no EV technology that I knew of that could supply such a wheel.

They assured me it was very possible. About 4 months after that letter, they sold what they had to some Italian company and completely abandoned their original design.. The FlyKly that shipped out was 1/2 the ebike wheel.. Same price...lol
 

travelfairy

New Member
SuperPedestrian has emailed me wanting the very specific specs of the bike I'm going to attach the wheel to. They are customizing the pre-orders, to the point where you have to specify whether you have single or 7 or 8 or 9 or 10 gears, how many teeth your gears have and a bunch of other stuff. I thought it would be more flexible, but if I have to get, for example, a 7 speed bike now, it doesn't look like I'll be able to change it up in the future and still fit the wheel. I also saw a weight restriction (250 lb including person and bike) and as I vary between 210-220 lb, that's going to put me towards the top of the range. I think I'm going to cancel my pre-order.
 

travelfairy

New Member
I was in a similar predicament. I've been riding the same bike for 18 years now (upgraded and maintained along the way so that only really the frame, forks and bars are original) and really like the fit of it. I didn't want to defile my trusty steed by adding an electric wheel so I went looking for a new bike to go with it instead. Ultimately, I bought a cheapish one that has the same measurements as the one I've been using for so long. Same handlebar height, same seat height, same distance from seat to bars, same bar width. The head tube angle is the only thing that is different between the two. I replaced a couple of the parts that will matter with higher end parts and ended up with a pretty good commuter bike for less than what I would have paid for a higher end bike. Maybe that's an option for you?

It could be, but I don't particularly care for my existing hybrid, I was just happy to use it because I already owned it.