Cost to recharge an ebike battery.

sidgabe

New Member
Region
USA
Had anyone out there sat down and figured out what it costs to recharge ebike batteries. Or the cost per mile to ride their machine? Just curious.
 

theemartymac

Well-Known Member
1576553536971-png.42818


 

Gionnirocket

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Y. O.
1576553536971-png.42818


These type of estimates never take into account the Delivery Cost, Line Maintenance, Taxes and other charges on your electric bill which usually add up to the largest portion of the bill... that said we're still talking pennies per charge so I stand by my original post 🙃

IMG_20210327_203519.jpg
 

Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
These type of estimates never take into account the Delivery Cost, Line Maintenance, Taxes and other charges on your electric bill which usually add up to the largest portion of the bill... that said we're still talking pennies per charge so I stand by my original post 🙃

View attachment 83003
U would save a lot with Solar panels+powerwall . But 0.08$ is not bad. Some states have 0.13$.
Imp. That it is afixed rate, in Tx when They had the winter storm a lot people had a variable rate....
 
D

Deleted member 18083

Guest
Had anyone figured out what it costs to recharge ebike batteries?
Yes.

The cost of recharging my batteries after today's long ride was the same as the cost of the mug of coffee and homemade muffin that I had on arriving home, but considerably less than the cost of the really good espresso with biscotto that I had on the ride.

The cost of recharging ebike batteries is utterly negligible compared with that of most things that happen in life.

I think that my conclusion is remarkably similar to the "two tents of a penny per mile" that the convoluted (but clearly not checked) calculation in the illustration above claims. Seriously, based on the claimed 0.2 cents, recharging after my six-hour ride really did cost the same as that muffin and mug of instant! :oops:
 
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Gionnirocket

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Y. O.
Yes.

The cost of recharging my batteries after today's long ride was the same as the cost of the mug of coffee and homemade muffin that I had on arriving home, but considerably less than the cost of the really good espresso with biscotto that I had on the ride.

The cost of recharging ebike batteries is utterly negligible compared with that of most things that happen in life.

I think that my conclusion is remarkably similar to the "two tents of a penny per mile" that the convoluted (but clearly not checked) calculation in the illustration above claims. Seriously, based on the claimed 0.2 cents, recharging after my six-hour ride really did cost the same as that muffin and mug of instant! :oops:

Now you got me thinking about the cost of life...

My morning Gionniccino (somewhere between a double espresso cappuccino and a café latte)
Espresso Bean 0.19
Milk 0.15
Almond Biscotto 0.20
TOTAL 0.54

Now my early afternoon Gionnicchiato (double espresso stained with a dollop of whipped cream) cost a little less.
Espresso Bean 0.19
Whip Cream 0.03
TOTAL 0.22

Now these don't take into account the cost of the electricity to grind the bean, refrigerate the milk and cream or run the espresso machine... But once again I'm back to my original post.
 

Gionnirocket

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Y. O.
U would save a lot with Solar panels+powerwall . But 0.08$ is not bad. Some states have 0.13$.
Imp. That it is afixed rate, in Tx when They had the winter storm a lot people had a variable rate....
My rate does vary by season, summer being the most expensive... but again the delivery charge and other fees are the bulk of the cost. Texas is unique in their unregulated rate structure.. Everything is Big in Texas!
IMG_20210328_074228.jpg

I've thought about solar but the initial cost is still a bit too high and I don't know how much longer I plan on staying in this area. I'm thinking of a place where I can ride year round amidst a more scenic landscape... or possibly where I can get an authentic macchiato.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
My rate does vary by season, summer being the most expensive... but again the delivery charge and other fees are the bulk of the cost. Texas is unique in their unregulated rate structure.. Everything is Big in Texas!
View attachment 83067

I've thought about solar but the initial cost is still a bit too high and I don't know how much longer I plan on staying in this area. I'm thinking of a place where I can ride year round amidst a more scenic landscape... or possibly where I can get an authentic macchiato.
An authentic macchiato and a scenic landscape in the USA seems like a lot to ask. The coffee is only available in a big city and the scenic areas serve Maxwell House or Starbucks. But the solar can work anywhere with a southern exposure.
 

Gionnirocket

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Y. O.
An authentic macchiato and a scenic landscape in the USA seems like a lot to ask. The coffee is only available in a big city and the scenic areas serve Maxwell House or Starbucks. But the solar can work anywhere with a southern exposure.
Oh when I said authentic macchiato... I was speaking of a place with real granita and gelato as well. Though I don't think I would want to be there full time... I can do 3 - 6 month stretches.
My next place wherever it is will be a lot smaller and simpler.... and yes, most likely have solar.
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
A Demented Corner of the North Cascades
I have grid-tied solar so the "cost" of charging my e-bike is $0.00.

"Cost" is in quotes because, yes, I did have to pay for the solar panels and inverter, but since they are a sunk cost I have paid for them whether I charge my e-bike or not.

While I am also in theory selling electricity to my utility, in practice there is a cap on how much I can sell and since I have an insane number of panels (8kW) I hit that cap pretty early, so again I am not losing anything by charging my e-bike.

Next step: find a great battery source and then I can pull the propane boiler and heat my home with free electricity as well.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
I have grid-tied solar so the "cost" of charging my e-bike is $0.00.

"Cost" is in quotes because, yes, I did have to pay for the solar panels and inverter, but since they are a sunk cost I have paid for them whether I charge my e-bike or not.

While I am also in theory selling electricity to my utility, in practice there is a cap on how much I can sell and since I have an insane number of panels (8kW) I hit that cap pretty early, so again I am not losing anything by charging my e-bike.

Next step: find a great battery source and then I can pull the propane boiler and heat my home with free electricity as well.
/ Way off topic
I have a 7kw system that covers about two thirds of my roof and still only generates about one third of my power ... welcome to cloudy, rainy, snowy Pennsylvania ... but five years in, it appears that it will still pay for itself in 10 more years and should last thirty more.
/ End off topic
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
U would save a lot with Solar panels+powerwall . But 0.08$ is not bad. Some states have 0.13$.
Imp. That it is afixed rate, in Tx when They had the winter storm a lot people had a variable rate....
It'll take a long time to pay for solar panels based on even 25 cents per charge.
 

Gionnirocket

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Y. O.
/ Way off topic
I have a 7kw system that covers about two thirds of my roof and still only generates about one third of my power ... welcome to cloudy, rainy, snowy Pennsylvania ... but five years in, it appears that it will still pay for itself in 10 more years and should last thirty more.
/ End off topic

/Double (espresso) way off topic
Definitely not authentic.
But true to concept and scale
IMAG0816~2.jpg

/ End off topic 🙃
 

alphacarina

Active Member
Region
USA
48 volts, 10 AH is 480 watts. We pay about 12 cents per KWH for juice, so that would seem to be about 6 cents for a full recharge . . . . but one ride seldom uses more than about half the battery, so lets call it 3 cents per ride . . . .

We do 'spend' about a buck fifty to recharge one of the cars, but that's after 3 or 4 days of normal driving

Don
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
Sounds about right, a nickle a day for a bike vs a half dollar a day for a car with reasonable miles of use on either.
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
Cost per mile is in this thread: https://electricbikereview.com/forums/threads/cost-per-mile-total-miles.41613/
In the city I have a connection charge of $10.50 and $.15 per KWH, so charging 2/3 of a 840 wh battery is $.083. At my summer camp I have a connection charge of $36 and $.18 per kwh so cost of a charge is $.10. Amortizing the connection charge over my average 70 kwh use (summer) runs the charge up to $.60. Since i'm penalized $150 to disconnect the electricity in the winter & reconnect in the summer, and I only use 372 kwh per year, the connection charge runs the kwh charge up to $1.16 per kwh, or $.76 to charge my battery out there.
It rains 220 days a year here, solar is not an option. Not to mention scrappers are stealing all the copper wire at properties not occupied. I have aluminum wire @ the summer camp. I'll see if my 200 W battery charge solar panel disappeared this winter in a week or two. I'd buy wind power, but all the idiot designers put $$$$ of electronics at the top of a steel pole. Sell a lot of $$$ replacement boards that way I suppose. Lots of $$$ furnace control boards get sold these days; lots of lightning here. My bimetallic spring & thermocouple furnace control box was never damaged in 35 years, so it is obsolete. Modern consumer products have to be replaced every three years.
 
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Gionnirocket

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Y. O.
48 volts, 10 AH is 480 watts. We pay about 12 cents per KWH for juice, so that would seem to be about 6 cents for a full recharge . . . . but one ride seldom uses more than about half the battery, so lets call it 3 cents per ride . . . .

We do 'spend' about a buck fifty to recharge one of the cars, but that's after 3 or 4 days of normal driving

Don
Another very minor factor is figuring in the inefficiency of the charger.
I doubt any charger has an Efficiency Rating about 85%... so add an approximate additional 15% to your batteries wattage.
 

K PierreR

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
48 volts, 10 AH is 480 watts. We pay about 12 cents per KWH for juice, so that would seem to be about 6 cents for a full recharge . . . . but one ride seldom uses more than about half the battery, so lets call it 3 cents per ride . . . .

We do 'spend' about a buck fifty to recharge one of the cars, but that's after 3 or 4 days of normal driving

Don
Yes, I have done all the math and find it about that cheap. The problem I had was I ride in a group of nice guys, some on e bikes. I forgot my battery one day and decided to ride without it. Did not take long before I was asking to borrow, maybe only 3 cents worth of electricicals. Now these are guys that would easily buy you a cup of coffee for $3.00 but were stingy enough not to help out with only 3 cents worth of electricity. You find out what a human labor is really worth this day in age. I ain't worth 2 cents
When you leave your battery at home, you find out you have no friends. 🤪
 
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