Cross Core + RedShift Stem

jcolbyc

Member
Just added a Redshift stem (100mm +6 degree) to my Cross Core that I put 600 miles on in the first 5 weeks. I wish I had added this from day one because it is a great addition for all the following reasons.

1. Works! This is not a front suspension so don't expect it to be, but it really dampers the teeth-rattling bumps like pavement undulations and railroad tracks. Almost like riding a bike with 2-3 inch tires even though I currently have 37mm tires on it.
2. Simple 10-minute installation on the Cross Core
3. The Cross Core like all Yamahas runs a little small. So Medium was just ever so slightly cramped even with my seat all the way back. The 100mm stem and 6-degree rise netted me about 17mm roughly of room and that makes a huge difference.
4. Quality versus price. The quality is there for a very reasonable price.

Highly recommended on this bike. I can't speak for the adjustable rise versions, in my mind, this bike is made for aggressive fitness road/gravel applications so not much need to raise it for me.

+Brooks C17 Cambium Seat
+Giant WaterProof Underseat Bag
+Continental Top Contact II - 37mm Tires


IMG_7883.JPG
IMG_7882.JPG
 
Last edited:

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
Looks like a worthwhile upgrade... what is the price point of the Redshift stem?
 

WattsUpDude

Well-Known Member
Looks like a worthwhile upgrade... what is the price point of the Redshift stem?

$150. Having used it for a week now, it's definitely worth it. My hands, arms, shoulders and neck still feel fresh after a couple hours of riding when it would normally feel some fatigue. And it's much lighter than a suspension fork. 🤓
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
$150. Having used it for a week now, it's definitely worth it.

My hands, arms, shoulders and neck still feel fresh after a couple hours of riding when it would normally feel some fatigue. And it's much lighter than a suspension fork. 🤓

Sounds good... also cheaper than a suspension fork. What is the amount of travel?
 

WattsUpDude

Well-Known Member
Sounds good... also cheaper than a suspension fork. What is the amount of travel?

It pretty much depends on the setup. A longer stem will provide more travel. And if it's used on drop bars, there's even more perceptible travel if your hands are on the hoods. I've read that it will give up to 20mm of vertical movement measured at the hoods.
 
Last edited:

Saratoga Dave

Well-Known Member
Noted, thanks. I can definitely see the advantages of it. I saw a review of this on Path Less Pedaled last year and thought it was interesting.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
$150. Having used it for a week now, it's definitely worth it.

My hands, arms, shoulders, and neck still feel fresh after a couple hours of riding when it would normally feel some fatigue. And it's much lighter than a suspension fork. 🤓


Very cool... I may have to test this product.

 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Based on the good reviews for the Redshift ShockStop Stem, I ordered the 30 degree 100 mm model for my Pedego Platinum Interceptor. There was some question as to whether this product would add any ride improvement to a bike with front suspension forks. The short answer is, it does. The Rockshox Gold forks on the bike do a good job of absorbing jolts from a rough trail surface but do little to dampen the high frequency vibration. The Redshift definitely helps here.

I was a bit annoyed though when I read the installation instructions. They say the stem is only compatible with drop, straight or flat bars and not recommended for cruiser or swept back bars. This isn't made clear in the product ads. I have 15 degree Jones H bars on the bike but I went ahead and installed the stem anyway. I found if I use a single #60 elastomer which is much softer than the ones specified for my weight, I do get noticeable results.

When I get a chance, I'll try the Redshift on one of my conventional Trek MTB's which have straight bars. I suspect there will be some improvement over what I'm seeing on the Pedego.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
Based on the good reviews for the Redshift ShockStop Stem, I ordered the 30 degree 100 mm model for my Pedego Platinum Interceptor. There was some question as to whether this product would add any ride improvement to a bike with front suspension forks. The short answer is, it does. The Rockshox Gold forks on the bike do a good job of absorbing jolts from a rough trail surface but do little to dampen the high frequency vibration. The Redshift definitely helps here.

I was a bit annoyed though when I read the installation instructions. They say the stem is only compatible with drop, straight or flat bars and not recommended for cruiser or swept back bars. This isn't made clear in the product ads. I have 15 degree Jones H bars on the bike but I went ahead and installed the stem anyway. I found if I use a single #60 elastomer which is much softer than the ones specified for my weight, I do get noticeable results.

When I get a chance, I'll try the Redshift on one of my conventional Trek MTB's which have straight bars. I suspect there will be some improvement over what I'm seeing on the Pedego.

Thanks for the review... any photos? 🙂
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the review... any photos? 🙂

Not very clear with all I have bolted to the bars and stem:

P1080405a.jpg P1080406a.jpg P1080409a.jpg

The Stem is designed to take downward force from drop or flat bars. The force is more angular with swept back bars but there is still some benefit.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
Kinekt also have their suspension stem. I have heard very things about them. Worth trying!

You put a suspension seatpost and stem on a bike like Civante, it would make riding 10x more fun.
 

antboy

Well-Known Member
Question for Kinekt users:

What's the minimum extension on a Kinekt? The ShockStop is 90 mm from max insertion to saddle rails. This is the number I can't find for Kinekt.


After researching various suspension posts, I can't find this piece of information, and maybe it's more variable because of the nature of setting firmness. I'd be going pretty firm, so it would be on the lower end. Just looking to smooth out some mild gravel and cobblestones. Not looking for a bouncy ride at all.

I might just get the ShockStop since I BARELY have 100 mm on my setup.

Others I had to cross off my list for this measurement:

Thudbuster ST at 100 mm
Satori Animaris at140 mm

I couldn't find info on the Suntour, but even if it would fit, I think I'd rather spend the extra on the Kinekt or ShockStop.
 

Latitude

Well-Known Member
I just installed the ShockStop stem, 100mm/30 degrees on my Trek Verve + 3. After riding 30 km on pavement/grassy trails, sometimes rough in both cases, I am very happy with it. Definitely absorbed the hits and vibration. Have just ordered their seatpost today. I think it will make my bike just about perfect for me. Here in Ontario, Canada we can not legally go beyond 20 mph/32km with an eBike, so the Verve has fit nicely for me. But the ride was a little harsh with no suspension other than a spring seatpost.
I had ordered a set of spacers and a stem cap from my Trek store, but couldn’t wait so I used an O-ring and made a cap out of ebony I had here. Looks not bad, I may keep it for a while, lol!
5FC0F72E-1BD1-47ED-8E12-184B2EAE8AFD.jpeg
 

Latitude

Well-Known Member
I was able to complete a 37 km ride today after some rain, and continue to be impressed with the ShockStop stem’s subtle ability to soak up impacts on the front wheel (Bontrager Hardcase tires at 30 psi) over some rough pavement and forest trails. What didn’t occur to me until a few hours after I returned home, was that I had experienced no numbness in my hands as I almost always have after 25 km or so, causing me to take one hand at a time off the bar and flex / rub them. Hope this continues!
 
Not very clear with all I have bolted to the bars and stem:

View attachment 62535 View attachment 62536 View attachment 62537

The Stem is designed to take downward force from drop or flat bars. The force is more angular with swept back bars but there is still some benefit.

Wow, that's high! Is that an uncut steerer tube or some sort of extension? Why do you need your bars up so high like that? Personal preference or are you like 7 feet tall?
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Wow, that's high! Is that an uncut steerer tube or some sort of extension? Why do you need your bars up so high like that? Personal preference or are you like 7 feet tall?

I'm 6' 2" but I have to use a noseless saddle. It's a 6" riser bolted to the top of the steerer tube. I'm most comfortable in the butt and wrists with the bars that high.
 
I'm 6' 2" but I have to use a noseless saddle. It's a 6" riser bolted to the top of the steerer tube. I'm most comfortable in the butt and wrists with the bars that high.

Ah ok, that makes sense. I just saw all of that length and wasn't sure why the bars were so high. I'm sure that makes it much more like a comfort or step-thru style bike 👍