CrossTour as a Daily Commuter?

Arbiter

New Member
At this time I only have room for one bike. Primary use is a daily commuter in NYC carrying one kid (either seat on the rear rack or Mountain bike seat in front of me) but I would love to be able to do some trail riding on the weekend and vacations. Last year I commuted year round including in the rain and winter (Except icy conditions). First found Wattwagons looking at the UC pro, as that was my primary focus but keep finding myself thinking those fat tires look fun. Anyone using their CrossTour primarily on paved, pothole filled roads?
 

Gene02638

New Member
My CrossTour is only 72 hours old or so... thus my usage is limited. I've been riding along local Cape Cod roads and sidewalks with an occasional short cut over a grass area or two. No sand yet as beaches aren't quite empty yet. I'm sure its not quite as fast or agile as the UCP, but its certainly a viable alternative IMHO. Its certainly better over the pot holes and happily I didn't get a flat over the broken glass I mistakenly road over a few minutes ago!
 

Leon S. Kennedy

New Member
I'm also interested in the CrossTour for dual purpose - commute during the week and trail riding on weekends and days off. The narrowest fat tire possible (under 4") would be my preference.
 

Gene02638

New Member
I'm also interested in the CrossTour for dual purpose - commute during the week and trail riding on weekends and days off. The narrowest fat tire possible (under 4") would be my preference.
I believe there's a forum entry (somewhere) stating 3.0 is the narrowest tire that would fit on the stock rims. Confirm with Pushkar.
 

byunbee

Well-Known Member
If you regularly ride in rain and snow during winter months, I would opt for the CrossTour, especially with a kid in the back. Lower TPI on tires for better comfort.
 

Leon S. Kennedy

New Member
If you regularly ride in rain and snow during winter months, I would opt for the CrossTour, especially with a kid in the back. Lower TPI on tires for better comfort.
Don't you mean higher TPI for better comfort? This is from Maxxis
TPI stands for threads per Inch. It defines the number of threads contained in one inch of the tire casing. The lower the number of TPI, the larger the gauge cords in the casing. Thus, the more durable the tire becomes. The higher the TPI, the more lightweight the tire becomes and the more supple the ride of the tire. The majority of our tires are 60 TPI, and our race tires are 120 TPI.