Cube vs Cube vs Cube

Tips

New Member
Region
Canada
I posted a "what bike should I buy" question in another forum a few weeks back, but I think I have it whittled down to 3 Cube bikes:

Cube Touring Pro e500
Cube Kathmandu One e500
Cube Kathmandu Pro 625

Basically i'd like to know if theres's any reason to choose the Kathmandu(s) and their CX motors over the Touring Pro and it's Performance Line motor for my use. 80-90% of the time this bike will be used for urban commuting on relatively flat stop-and-go routes (the rest would be dirt trails for fun). I like the larger Bosch Intuvia display on the Pro models (and that its apparently removable) but I also like the CX motor which the Kathmandu's have, but the e500 Kath only has the Purion display and I'm not sure I need the 625 battery pack (or its weight) on the Kath Pro.

I live in Canada so my ebike options are limited (nothing over 32km/h), but these seem like nice bikes and a local to me shop has all of them in stock. Seems like they only have a 54cm in the Touring but 54 and 58s in the Kaths, I am 6"2/189cm tall, and currently have a standard 54cm Trek bike and haven't had a issue with it that size.

Any thoughts are appreciated.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
The bigger battery is the major reason to take a Pro. You do not know yet how your e-biking would develop in the future. You might discover how much fun it is to ride e-bike. Your trips would become longer and longer; you would soon discover what the "anxiety range" really means; and buyer's remorse will haunt you: "Why haven't I bought the Pro 625?!" Now, an extra larger battery is insanely expensive.

Does the wind blow where you live? (Certainly, it does). Stronger motor is great on upwind rides. Again, that would be a bad surprise for you if you bought a 500 Wh e-bike. Fancy that your outbound ride leg is downwind. You're happily pedalling and now you need to return. Upwind. With a smaller battery it is almost guaranteed you might be completing your trip on pedal power only :)

Next: Crossing junctions. Provided you always shift down on approaching signals, the CX motor will ensure higher acceleration. Can save your life.

Regarding the battery weight: The 500 Wh one is 2.8 kg, and the 625 one is 3.5 kg. Big deal?

P.S. Purion vs Intuvia? Both are very limited regarding their capabilities. I would be more worried about the 2 A charger.
 

skritikos

Member
Region
Europe
City
Athens, Greece
I posted a "what bike should I buy" question in another forum a few weeks back, but I think I have it whittled down to 3 Cube bikes:

Cube Touring Pro e500
Cube Kathmandu One e500
Cube Kathmandu Pro 625

Basically i'd like to know if theres's any reason to choose the Kathmandu(s) and their CX motors over the Touring Pro and it's Performance Line motor for my use. 80-90% of the time this bike will be used for urban commuting on relatively flat stop-and-go routes (the rest would be dirt trails for fun). I like the larger Bosch Intuvia display on the Pro models (and that its apparently removable) but I also like the CX motor which the Kathmandu's have, but the e500 Kath only has the Purion display and I'm not sure I need the 625 battery pack (or its weight) on the Kath Pro.

I live in Canada so my ebike options are limited (nothing over 32km/h), but these seem like nice bikes and a local to me shop has all of them in stock. Seems like they only have a 54cm in the Touring but 54 and 58s in the Kaths, I am 6"2/189cm tall, and currently have a standard 54cm Trek bike and haven't had a issue with it that size.

Any thoughts are appreciated.
Its almost certain you don't need the CX motor. The Gen3 Performance will be more than enough whatever hills you might have.
If you click on my username and check my posts you will see more than a few posts about my experience with a 2021 Touring EXC using the Gen3 Performance motor.
Too many hills and mountains where I live, headwinds, tailwinds, everything in but the engine is excellent in any conditions just by using ECO and Tour. Sport is crazy fast and Turbo never used.
Average range with the 625 battery, on mixed rides with close to 1000-1200m ascends, more than 140km.
Maximum I've seen would be around 190km if I wanted to empty the battery (I'm avoiding that, so I usually charge at 20-40% up to max)

Be careful with Cube sizing. The big frames are really BIG! I am 6'6" and the XL is right on the limit of too large even for me!
 

skritikos

Member
Region
Europe
City
Athens, Greece
skritikos: Motor is one thing, battery size is another. Of the three chosen e-bikes only one comes with a larger battery.
This is what I was trying to say. That the 500 battery should be more than sufficient. And in these specific frames the 625 battery seems retrofittable by moving the battery mount.
But the 500 should be more than enough for normal commuting over a week.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
But the 500 should be more than enough for normal commuting over a week.
His riding needs might grow. It also depends on his physical shape. I can only tell you the 500 Wh battery on my e-MTB was laughable related to my needs (but given model was only available with such a battery). The spare 625 Wh cost me over a grand in US money. IMO there's no notion of "too big a battery". A battery can be emptied very fast, all depending.
 

skritikos

Member
Region
Europe
City
Athens, Greece
That's the reason I provided some of my range numbers with the related ascending. Only the original poster can balance his needs and plans.
When I initially got the ebike I was thinking that rides close to 90km with be the maximum limit on my (road) terrain.
After 2000km I now see that even with a 500 battery rides close to 110km would be easily feasible.

PS. MTB terrain is totally different of course. I only do MTB on a normal hardtail and I can always feel the burn from the steep technical hills, despite all the training I do on the road.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
That's the reason I provided some of my range numbers with the related ascending. Only the original poster can balance his needs and plans.
When I initially got the ebike I was thinking that rides close to 90km with be the maximum limit on my (road) terrain.
After 2000km I now see that even with a 500 battery rides close to 110km would be easily feasible.

PS. MTB terrain is totally different of course. I only do MTB on a normal hardtail and I can always feel the burn from the steep technical hills, despite all the training I do on the road.
Given the range numbers you cite, I conclude that you are a considerably more fit rider than many of the people asking for advice on this thread. While the 500 watt battery is clearly all you need, someone who weighs more than you and/or may not be quite as fit as you might need the extra 25% of battery power to accomplish the same results as you can. And if they don't they might end up wanting to do longer rides and still be able to put the 625 battery to regular use.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I would go with the Kathmandu. Having the added oomph of the CX motor does not mean you have to use it all the time. Same with the larger battery. I have not checked but the spec on the brakes are usually better on bikes with more robust motors and batteries.

It is usually better to go with more motor capability and greater battery power and not have to use them, than to go with lesser specs and come up short.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
After 2000km I now see that even with a 500 battery rides close to 110km would be easily feasible.
My lightweight brother who is very fit rode 120 km/70 mi on a 500 Wh battery e-MTB. With the same e-MTB and battery, I could cover 42 38 km only on March 7th, 2021. It was a gravel-cycling trip and that leg was into 33.6 km/h wind.

1616440396689.png

Actually, I replaced the battery that was not empty yet on that ride. On a similar ride a week later, I made 42 km with lighter headwind on that battery.
 
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Tips

New Member
Region
Canada
Appreciate the thoughts, great info.

The main thing holding me back from a Kathmandu Pro is the price. Sure the bigger battery, the better motor, and the better display are great, but its basically $1k CDN more than the the Touring Pro. The Kathmandu e500 is only about $200 more then then Touring Pro, so those two are much closer in price. For reference, the Kath Pro is basically the same price as a Trek Allant+ 8 for me.

What separates the Intuvia display over the Purion for me was that its removable. This would be handy if i needed to briefly lock it up somewhere out in the open and i could take it with me. The fixed Purion display is more subtle so people may not notice it, but it's a risk.

Also appreciate that may needs may evolve over time, and that may very well be, but they could also, not. I just don't want to pay $1k extra for something that may may not use to its fullest, it seems like ebikes depreciate in value quickly, one thing im wary of on a already expensive purchase.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Appreciate the thoughts, great info.

The main thing holding me back from a Kathmandu Pro is the price. Sure the bigger battery, the better motor, and the better display are great, but its basically $1k CDN more than the the Touring Pro. The Kathmandu e500 is only about $200 more then then Touring Pro, so those two are much closer in price. For reference, the Kath Pro is basically the same price as a Trek Allant+ 8 for me.

What separates the Intuvia display over the Purion for me was that its removable. This would be handy if i needed to briefly lock it up somewhere out in the open and i could take it with me. The fixed Purion display is more subtle so people may not notice it, but it's a risk.

Also appreciate that may needs may evolve over time, and that may very well be, but they could also, not. I just don't want to pay $1k extra for something that may may not use to its fullest, it seems like ebikes depreciate in value quickly, one thing im wary of on a already expensive purchase.
The most common comment from new ebike riders is, "I never imagined I would ride my new bike so often and so far."

Would you rather pay $1,000 less for a bike that you may find limited or disappointing and then have to sell it at a loss so you can get the a bike with the capabilities you learned that you really want at the higher price tag and add to that the difference between what you paid for the lesser bike and what you could get for it used? That extra money for the better, motor, display and battery should be viewed as an insurance policy that reduces the possibility that the bike you buy is quickly outgrown.

The memory of the pain of paying 20% more for the bike fades quickly when the bike you bought puts a big grin on your face every time you ride it and you don't discover you really needed that bigger battery after all.
 

Tips

New Member
Region
Canada
The most common comment from new ebike riders is, "I never imagined I would ride my new bike so often and so far."

Would you rather pay $1,000 less for a bike that you may find limited or disappointing and then have to sell it at a loss so you can get the a bike with the capabilities you learned that you really want at the higher price tag and add to that the difference between what you paid for the lesser bike and what you could get for it used? That extra money for the better, motor, display and battery should be viewed as an insurance policy that reduces the possibility that the bike you buy is quickly outgrown.

The memory of the pain of paying 20% more for the bike fades quickly when the bike you bought puts a big grin on your face every time you ride it and you don't discover you really needed that bigger battery after all.
This is 100% fair, I am definitely a ebike rookie, and I could see myself saying the same thing.

I'm just not convinced that I will use a such a high end touring ebike (Kath Pro) beyond commuting that much, but as you pointed out, I could be proven wrong once I actually start using it. I'll go try and look at them again here soon.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
I just don't want to pay $1k extra for something that may may not use to its fullest, it seems like ebikes depreciate in value quickly, one thing im wary of on a already expensive purchase.
Are you aware that a spare 625 Wh Bosch battery alone costs CAD1275? (If that can replace the 500 Wh battery at all, not sure).
 

Rocky Top

New Member
Region
USA
As the proud owner of the Kathmandu Pro 625, I can attest to its worth. Sure, it was expensive, but I still think I made the right decision to buy it. It wasn't even on my radar until I stumbled across one in stock in Oregon. I wanted a bike that could help my 68 year old bones ride the rolling hills of east Tennessee. It has delivered. The battery lasts long after I do.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Are you aware that a spare 625 Wh Bosch battery alone costs CAD1275? (If that can replace the 500 Wh battery at all, not sure).
The 625 battery is longer, by about 70mm. I have a 625 in my Allant 9.9 and a 500 in my Topstone Neo Carbon3 so I measure them. This is why it is not available in some smaller size ebikes. It just needs a long enough down tube to contain it.

I have not heard of any ebike in which the two are interchangeable. Once you have a bike with a 500watt battery, if you want the 625watt, you need a different bike. The only option you have is to purchase a second battery and an OEM cover for it so it can be quickly swapped out and then there is the issue of where to carry it on the bike. They are long and do not fit in most bike bags and you should never carry a Lithium Ion battery in a backpack.
 
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skritikos

Member
Region
Europe
City
Athens, Greece
The 625 battery is longer, by about 70mm. I have a 625 in my Allant 9.9 and a 500 in my Topstone Neo Carbon3 so I measure them. This is why it is not available in some smaller size ebikes. It just needs a long enough down tube to contain it.

I have not heard of any ebike in which the two are interchangeable. Once you have a bike with a 500watt battery, if you want the 625watt, you need a different bike. The only option you have is to purchase a second battery and an OEM cover for it so it can be quickly swapped out and then there is the issue of where to carry it on the bike. They are long and do not fit in most bike bags and you should never carry a Lithium Ion battery in a backpack.
As Cube is using mostly the same exact frame on each series and type, by comparing two identical frames, one with 625 and the other with 400 (same like 500) I can see they just use different positions to mount the upper lock, extending it for 625 and shortening it for 400/500. The position for the bigger/smaller battery is even marked on all frames!
 

Helaine

New Member
Region
USA
City
Los Angeles
I have not heard of any ebike in which the two are interchangeable. Once you have a bike with a 500watt battery, if you want the 625watt, you need a different bike. The only option you have is to purchase a second battery and an OEM cover for it so it can be quickly swapped out and then there is the issue of where to carry it on the bike. They are long and do not fit in most bike bags and you should never carry a Lithium Ion battery in a backpack.
I'm new to all this and curious. Why should you never carry a Lithium Ion battery in a backpack?
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I'm new to all this and curious. Why should you never carry a Lithium Ion battery in a backpack?
It is not common but they have been known to erupt in flames when damaged. If you were to crash, a battery in a backpack on your back could pose a serious threat to your well being.