Customize your Sinch

Ocala

New Member
Region
USA
Greetings fellow Ebikers!

I just bought my first Ebike, an Aventon Sinch, and thought I would share some things I added. My neighbor has a fairly high quality E Mtn Bike, and I took it for a spin.

Instantly hooked, I started looking for something less than $2000, a fairly upright riding position, and decent components, battery, motor etc.

The moment I saw the Sinch it was love at first sight, and here is why.

Sinch and 300.jpg


Just kidding, I am partial to white/black vehicles though. Gotta say I love the design of this bike, the frame just flows and has a retro-futuristic vibe too it. A lot of the other foldable bikes I looked at did not have much curb appeal and had clunky designs. Also many other foldables show maximum height of rider at 5'10" which is too small for me. But beauty is only skin deep.

So I took a look under the hood. I think one of the first reviews I read was here at Electric Bike Review. They had lots of good things to say, decent components, quality frame, 20 inch fat tires, large battery etc etc. Foldable was just a bonus. I think the only cons were no throttle on demand and pedal assist levels 1 and 2 were a little jerky. I heard Aventon addressed these by tweaking their controller. So I contacted Aventon and was assured all bikes now have the improved control functions. So I ordered one.

About a week later a big box arrived on my doorstep. As I unpacked it I noticed how professionally it was done, foam and cardboard protection in all the right spots etc. I watched their 5 minute video on assembly and found it very simple, bike was ready in 20 minutes. Charged the battery and took it for a spin. Played with seat and handlebar heights, I am 6'3" so both I am maxed out on handlebar and saddle heights. (more on this later) Anyway, the bike rode like a charm, I did not have to adjust brakes, derailleur etc. Happy buyer!

The bike needed a few things to make it even better, so this is what I did.

First thing I changed were the grips. The bike came with good quality lockable Velo grips, but I wanted something a bit more comfortable. I looked at a lot of grips, and luckily chose a pair that fit my hands perfectly. BW USA Ergo grips are available on Amazon for $16. They are lockable and made from a rubber like compound made by Kraton. They feel great on your hands, and the palm rest wing actually flexes a bit, like a mini shock absorber for your palms. They are lockable as well.

BW grips.jpg


Next I added a mirror. Found this one by Hafny on Amazon for $22. You can mount it above or below the handlebar, I chose below as you actually can see behind you a little
better because your hips are narrower than your shoulders. At least I hope they are. :)

Mirror 1.jpg



I clamped the mirror to the right of break clamp, and moved the throttle and on/off PA level switch to the right. I also reversed the order of those last two items. From factory the bike
(from left grip in) comes like this grip/brake/throttle/on-off & PA level switch. I changed the order to grip/brake/mirror/on-off PA switch/throttle. I don't use the throttle all that much and this makes it harder to push it by mistake. Ask me how I know. :)

switch order.jpg



Next I wanted to install a bottle cage for my water bottle. Unless you wanted to start drilling holes in the frame :eek: I saw 3 possible locations where I could mount a clamp style bottle cage bracket. The seatpost, the handlebars, or the head tube. I chose the head tube because seatpost mount is not the easiest to reach (plus I collapse seat when not riding) and water bottles on the handlebars unbalance the bike. The headtube on the Sinch is flared, its bigger where it meets the frame. There is also a lever you use to fold the headtube and handle bars when folding the bike. So I measured the diameter of the headtube just above this lever and it was about 40mm. Most bottle cage bracket clamps are made for smaller tube diameters, but there are some that handle larger tubes. First I tried one by Bikase (large size firs 31mm to 43mm) This one is plastic and when I mounted a bottlecage and full water bottle on it it sagged, not rigid enough. I looked for a metal one and finally found a metal one called DeepRoar water bottle cage on Amazon that handles up to 41mm tubes. Works perfect.

T Racer cage.jpg


I use stainless steel water bottles cuz they keep things cold longer, so I chose a bottle cage made by Elite called the T Racer that is made from some kind of nylon fibers and won't scratch your stainless bottle. Also looks cool on the Sinch :cool: NOTE: The T Racer cage will not fit a stainless bottle more than 2.8 inchs diameter. My Iron Flask 24oz bottle is 2.8 and it fits perfect. Does not rattle or sway. Get the Straw Lid, you don't have to tilt the bottle or your head to get a drink.

Iron Flask.jpg


Next was probably the most important, the Saddle. I ride for fun, I don't like pain in my rear end, and if the road bike warriors sneer at me I don't care. 😁

I like Selle Royal saddles, they are made in Italy and are high quality gel seats. They make skinny racing saddles, medium saddles, relaxed saddles etc for every type of riding position.
I found this Selle Royale Journey on Amazon for $44 and it is money well spent.

SR Journey.jpg


Another cool thing about Selle Royale saddles is they have a clip system in the back which enables installing a saddle bag behind the saddle. I wanted something to hold cell phone, keys, bike tool etc and the medium size is perfect. They also make a small and a large version. $18 at Amazon

SR Saddle.jpg


For even more rear end happiness, I decided to get a suspension seat post. About 50% of my rides are on unpaved trails that can get bumpy. SR Suntour NCX is very affordable ($110) and works very well. It has 50MM of travel and you can adjust the firmness. Their standard model comes with a spring that handles rider weights of 140-180 pounds. I weigh 225 so I bought their extra firm spring for $15. This is a really good addition to the Sinch, it really improves the ride. Suntour makes this post in both 350mm and 400mm, same price, if you are taller like me get the 400mm.

Suntour NCX.jpg


I also have ordered a protective case for my Sinch's M5 controller in case someone drops a hammer on my bike. Aventon and a few others sell these but they do not protect the glass screen of the M5, just the edges. I searched and searched and finally found this guy called FastEddies3DProductions who makes M5 cases on a 3D printer and include an acrylic screen cover. Eddie is a Sinch owner and also makes mudflaps for the Sinch. Will update when I recieve it.


The last thing I am thinking about is flat protection. I ride some pretty rough ground. I live a mile from the Cross Florida Greenway trail, and less than 15 miles to the Baseline and Santos Trailheads. I am open to suggestions on flat protection. I could buy some Slime or FlatOut, but I have heard they don't work so good on tubed tires. I could buy some Tuffy liners, but expensive and a pain to install. I am thinking the best thing would be to buy some tubeless tires and inject with FlatOut, heard this works pretty good.

Anyone who has put tubeless tires on a Sinch? What brand and cost?

Thanks for reading!

Ocala









 
Last edited:

WildCatFan60

New Member
Region
USA
Greetings fellow Ebikers!

I just bought my first Ebike, an Aventon Sinch, and thought I would share some things I added. My neighbor has a fairly high quality E Mtn Bike, and I took it for a spin.

Instantly hooked, I started looking for something less than $2000, a fairly upright riding position, and decent components, battery, motor etc.

The moment I saw the Sinch it was love at first sight, and here is why.

View attachment 100466

Just kidding, I am partial to white/black vehicles though. Gotta say I love the design of this bike, the frame just flows and has a retro-futuristic vibe too it. A lot of the other foldable bikes I looked at did not have much curb appeal and had clunky designs. Also many other foldables show maximum height of rider at 5'10" which is too small for me. But beauty is only skin deep.

So I took a look under the hood. I think one of the first reviews I read was here at Electric Bike Review. They had lots of good things to say, decent components, quality frame, 20 inch fat tires, large battery etc etc. Foldable was just a bonus. I think the only cons were no throttle on demand and pedal assist levels 1 and 2 were a little jerky. I heard Aventon addressed these by tweaking their controller. So I contacted Aventon and was assured all bikes now have the improved control functions. So I ordered one.

About a week later a big box arrived on my doorstep. As I unpacked it I noticed how professionally it was done, foam and cardboard protection in all the right spots etc. I watched their 5 minute video on assembly and found it very simple, bike was ready in 20 minutes. Charged the battery and took it for a spin. Played with seat and handlebar heights, I am 6'3" so both I am maxed out on handlebar and saddle heights. (more on this later) Anyway, the bike rode like a charm, I did not have to adjust brakes, derailleur etc. Happy buyer!

The bike needed a few things to make it even better, so this is what I did.

First thing I changed were the grips. The bike came with good quality lockable Velo grips, but I wanted something a bit more comfortable. I looked at a lot of grips, and luckily chose a pair that fit my hands perfectly. BW USA Ergo grips are available on Amazon for $16. They are lockable and made from a rubber like compound made by Kraton. They feel great on your hands, and the palm rest wing actually flexes a bit, like a mini shock absorber for your palms. They are lockable as well.

View attachment 100472

Next I added a mirror. Found this one by Hafny on Amazon for $22. You can mount it above or below the handlebar, I chose below as you actually can see behind you a little
better because your hips are narrower than your shoulders. At least I hope they are. :)

View attachment 100473


I clamped the mirror to the right of break clamp, and moved the throttle and on/off PA level switch to the right. I also reversed the order of those last two items. From factory the bike
(from left grip in) comes like this grip/brake/throttle/on-off & PA level switch. I changed the order to grip/brake/mirror/on-off PA switch/throttle. I don't use the throttle all that much and this makes it harder to push it by mistake. Ask me how I know. :)

View attachment 100475


Next I wanted to install a bottle cage for my water bottle. Unless you wanted to start drilling holes in the frame :eek: I saw 3 possible locations where I could mount a clamp style bottle cage bracket. The seatpost, the handlebars, or the head tube. I chose the head tube because seatpost mount is not the easiest to reach (plus I collapse seat when not riding) and water bottles on the handlebars unbalance the bike. The headtube on the Sinch is flared, its bigger where it meets the frame. There is also a lever you use to fold the headtube and handle bars when folding the bike. So I measured the diameter of the headtube just above this lever and it was about 40mm. Most bottle cage bracket clamps are made for smaller tube diameters, but there are some that handle larger tubes. First I tried one by Bikase (large size firs 31mm to 43mm) This one is plastic and when I mounted a bottlecage and full water bottle on it it sagged, not rigid enough. I looked for a metal one and finally found a metal one called DeepRoar water bottle cage on Amazon that handles up to 41mm tubes. Works perfect.

View attachment 100477

I use stainless steel water bottles cuz they keep things cold longer, so I chose a bottle cage made by Elite called the T Racer that is made from some kind of nylon fibers and won't scratch your stainless bottle. Also looks cool on the Sinch :cool: NOTE: The T Racer cage will not fit a stainless bottle more than 2.8 inchs diameter. My Iron Flask 24oz bottle is 2.8 and it fits perfect. Does not rattle or sway. Get the Straw Lid, you don't have to tilt the bottle or your head to get a drink.

View attachment 100478

Next was probably the most important, the Saddle. I ride for fun, I don't like pain in my rear end, and if the road bike warriors sneer at me I don't care. 😁

I like Selle Royal saddles, they are made in Italy and are high quality gel seats. They make skinny racing saddles, medium saddles, relaxed saddles etc for every type of riding position.
I found this Selle Royale Journey on Amazon for $44 and it is money well spent.

View attachment 100480

Another cool thing about Selle Royale saddles is they have a clip system in the back which enables installing a saddle bag behind the saddle. I wanted something to hold cell phone, keys, bike tool etc and the medium size is perfect. They also make a small and a large version. $18 at Amazon

View attachment 100490

For even more rear end happiness, I decided to get a suspension seat post. About 50% of my rides are on unpaved trails that can get bumpy. SR Suntour NCX is very affordable ($110) and works very well. It has 50MM of travel and you can adjust the firmness. Their standard model comes with a spring that handles rider weights of 140-180 pounds. I weigh 225 so I bought their extra firm spring for $15. This is a really good addition to the Sinch, it really improves the ride. Suntour makes this post in both 350mm and 400mm, same price, if you are taller like me get the 400mm.

View attachment 100482

I also have ordered a protective case for my Sinch's M5 controller in case someone drops a hammer on my bike. Aventon and a few others sell these but they do not protect the glass screen of the M5, just the edges. I searched and searched and finally found this guy called FastEddies3DProductions who makes M5 cases on a 3D printer and include an acrylic screen cover. Eddie is a Sinch owner and also makes mudflaps for the Sinch. Will update when I recieve it.


The last thing I am thinking about is flat protection. I ride some pretty rough ground. I live a mile from the Cross Florida Greenway trail, and less than 15 miles to the Baseline and Santos Trailheads. I am open to suggestions on flat protection. I could buy some Slime or FlatOut, but I have heard they don't work so good on tubed tires. I could buy some Tuffy liners, but expensive and a pain to install. I am thinking the best thing would be to buy some tubeless tires and inject with FlatOut, heard this works pretty good.

Anyone who has put tubeless tires on a Sinch? What brand and cost?

Thanks for reading!

Ocala









Bolton Ebikes did a great comparison review on Flat Tire prevention options... I believe Flat out was their winner.
 

Yeti

New Member
Region
Canada
Those are some great ideas! I also changed the grips to some very similar for what you installed. I’d be very interested in knowing what handlebar you install and if possible a photo post installation would be great.