Cycle Satiator Recommended Charging Profiles?

330rcs

Active Member
I just got the cycle satiator quick charger. What's the recommended charging profiles/settings for overall life of the battery? It looks like there is a preset profile for 52v Lithium which will charge to 85% at 4.0 amp and I have already read that charging to 80-85% is recommended vs charging to 100%.

If I charger slower at 2.0 amp will it help increase the life the battery? Ideally I'd like to charge at 4.0 amp during the day if needed for a quick charge but at night I could charge at 2.0 amp is this a good idea? Or as long as I don't go over 4.0 amp it won't make much difference?

The only thing is the charger for whatever reason appears to not have a preset 2.0 amp setting for 52v only 4.0 or 7.0 (which I would never do. I would have to create a new charging profile for 2.0 amp I believe. I haven't turned it on yet just reading the manual it does say there are a bunch of profiles in the settings that aren't active so it could be there.

Otherwise let me know your preferred charging settings for 52v. I have a 19.2ah for the Ripcurrent S if it makes any difference
 

tomjasz

Well-Known Member
Programming is easy. I have profiles for 100% at 4A, and 80% and 90% at 2A. These days most packs are capable of a 5A charge rate, but in the end, I usually use 2A profiles for the best practice suggested by many. I always do an occasional 100% 6-hour charge as several of my batteries do not have a balance feature BMS.
 

Explorer-1

Well-Known Member
I just got the cycle satiator quick charger. What's the recommended charging profiles/settings for overall life of the battery? It looks like there is a preset profile for 52v Lithium which will charge to 85% at 4.0 amp and I have already read that charging to 80-85% is recommended vs charging to 100%.

If I charger slower at 2.0 amp will it help increase the life the battery? Ideally I'd like to charge at 4.0 amp during the day if needed for a quick charge but at night I could charge at 2.0 amp is this a good idea? Or as long as I don't go over 4.0 amp it won't make much difference?

The only thing is the charger for whatever reason appears to not have a preset 2.0 amp setting for 52v only 4.0 or 7.0 (which I would never do. I would have to create a new charging profile for 2.0 amp I believe. I haven't turned it on yet just reading the manual it does say there are a bunch of profiles in the settings that aren't active so it could be there.

Otherwise let me know your preferred charging settings for 52v. I have a 19.2ah for the Ripcurrent S if it makes any difference
A 2A charge rate on a 19.2 Ah battery is like a trickle charge. There are some studies about such low charge rates you might be able to find on-line. The recommended profile depends on the battery, not its voltage. It is best to identify the cells used in the battery, and get the manufacture's spec for those cells, as for example your RCS batter in real life is quite different than the advertised specs from Juiced. Manufactures can also change the cells they use without announcing this, or as some manufactures do they say we use X, or Y, or Z so you are not sure which ones are in the battery you have purchased.

Not sure this helps, but with the information provided I will say that for your battery 2A vs 4A is a non issue.
 

330rcs

Active Member
Not sure this helps, but with the information provided I will say that for your battery 2A vs 4A is a non issue.

That's what I actually thought but wanted to double check. Still though it makes me hesitant so since I got it I have still been charging at 2amp. If it's overnight I feel why not but if I needed it quick then I could bump it up to 4amp.

The reason I figured with a battery this size it wouldnt matter. When I was at my rc shop we would charge lithium 11.1v and 7.2v 5000mah (milliamps) at 4.0 amp all the time. We would use a 10% rule. So if it was a 3000mah we would charge at 3.0amp, 4000mah at 4amp etc but we never went higher than 4amps (even if battery was 5000mah) I don't think those chargers would let us anyway.

So if my battery is 19.2ah (or even somewhat less) that is 19,200mah. So I would never use our 10% rule here or like I said I don't want to charge higher than 4amp but by similar math I would assume that 4amp should be way under than what the battery could actually handle. So that's the reason I thought charging at 4amp shouldn't effect the battery but that's based on my experience with rc car lithium batteries.

I guess the most important thing here is that I don't charge my battery higher than 85% this rule I never knew about when it came to lithium batteries. I heard about this when I got into ebikes. For 1.5 yr I have been using the trickle charger and charging my ebike to 100% and I don't want to continue doing that so I got this new charger and I got a new ebike recently and from day 1 I want to charge the battery properly to prolong the life.
 
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Explorer-1

Well-Known Member
That's what I actually thought but wanted to double check. Still though it makes me hesitant so since I got it I have still been charging at 2amp. If it's overnight I feel why not but if I needed it quick then I could bump it up to 4amp.

The reason I figured with a battery this size it wouldnt matter. When I was at my rc shop we would charge lithium 11.1v and 7.2v 5000mah (milliamps) at 4.0 amp all the time. We would use a 10% rule. So if it was a 3000mah we would charge at 3.0amp, 4000mah at 4amp etc but we never went higher than 4amps (even if battery was 5000mah) I don't think those chargers would let us anyway.

So if my battery is 19.2ah (or even somewhat less) that is 19,200mah. So I would never use our 10% rule here or like I said I don't want to charge higher than 4amp but by similar math I would assume that 4amp should be way under than what the battery could actually handle. So that's the reason I thought charging at 4amp shouldn't effect the battery but that's based on my experience with rc car lithium batteries.

I guess the most important thing here is that I don't charge my battery higher than 85% this rule I never knew about when it came to lithium batteries. I heard about this when I got into ebikes. For 1.5 yr I have been using the trickle charger and charging my ebike to 100% and I don't want to continue doing that so I got this new charger and I got a new ebike recently and from day 1 I want to charge the battery properly to prolong the life.
While RC batteries (Li-Pil) are a different than the cylindrical cells used in e-bike batteries, I'm not sure where that 10% rule come from make little sense for our cells or for Li-Pol to be honest. the 10% rule was often used with NiCad/NiMh cells.

> guess the most important thing here is that I don't charge my battery higher than 85%
I don't particularly follow that 'guideline', but if you're comfortable with that and you don't need the range or performance of 100% charge, then it may be OK if your cells will balance at that level most stock BMSs won't. Personally since your battery has a built in BMS (and probably only balances after 100%) I would not try to follow that, but it is up to you. if you are not going to use your bike for a couple months put the battery at storage level, might help. store at a reasonable ambient temperature.

My approach is 100%,, time for balance, and go. If the battery has to sit for a few days I don't sweat it either.
 

330rcs

Active Member
I don't particularly follow that 'guideline', but if you're comfortable with that and you don't need the range or performance of 100% charge, then it may be OK if your cells will balance at that level most stock BMSs won't. Personally since your battery has a built in BMS (and probably only balances after 100%) I would not try to follow that, but it is up to you. if you are not going to use your bike for a couple months put the battery at storage level, might help. store at a reasonable ambient temperature.

My approach is 100%,, time for balance, and go. If the battery has to sit for a few days I don't sweat it either.

Well shoot I had no idea about the BMS if that's the case then I will continue charging to 100% honestly I would rather have that extra range. I just thought it would be safer for my battery. I will definitely keep it in mind to put it in storage.

Thanks!!
 

tomjasz

Well-Known Member
Batteries that I've been good to and used Satiator 50%, 80%, 90%, and 100% settings are my oldest battery packs.

With the Satiator you can charge to a lower percentage for longevity and to 100% when really needed. If not why bother with a Satiator?
 

330rcs

Active Member
Batteries that I've been good to and used Satiator 50%, 80%, 90%, and 100% settings are my oldest battery packs.

With the Satiator you can charge to a lower percentage for longevity and to 100% when really needed. If not why bother with a Satiator?

Yeah I thought about that too my initial reasoning to get it was because I thought I had to charge to 85% and so I'm basically getting confused now.

Though I can quick charge now in the rare instance that I left it off the charger or had extra stuff to do that day and needed to charge up quickly if I ran too low.
 

Ant~Phan

New Member
Batteries that I've been good to and used Satiator 50%, 80%, 90%, and 100% settings are my oldest battery packs.

With the Satiator you can charge to a lower percentage for longevity and to 100% when really needed. If not why bother with a Satiator?
Mr. Jaszewski: are your referring to the JB's 52V-19.2Ah pack as supplied with the CrossCurrentX, HyperScorpion, etc? If so, when, using the GRIN Satiator to charge to 100% - I assume target charge voltage = 58.8V - what voltage does the bike's Control Unit show at the handle bar display? Is it that same full 100% SoC voltage of 58.8V or something different? If so, what? And, have you ever measured the voltage at the pack's charge port when charging to 100%
 

Ant~Phan

New Member
Thank you for the prompt and concise reply. I have been well informed by you input to several OP on this and other bike type pages so hoped that you might have experience of that particular pack from JB.

But, if I may, I hope to benefit from you considerable experience "...in the trade" as it were. Do you know of any packs that hold a standing voltage - of say 0.8V to 1.3V at their discharge ports (power feed to the controller) even when the pack is powered off? And, if so, what is the purpose such voltages?